WorldCat Identities

Paper Print Collection (Library of Congress)

Overview
Works: 597 works in 621 publications in 1 language and 2,815 library holdings
Genres: History  Drama  Silent films  Travelogues (Motion pictures)  Sources  Archives  Biography  Documentary films  Nonfiction films 
Classifications: LC2180 (PAPER POS), 973.9
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Paper Print Collection (Library of Congress) Publications about Paper Print Collection (Library of Congress)
Publications by Paper Print Collection (Library of Congress) Publications by Paper Print Collection (Library of Congress)
Most widely held works by Paper Print Collection (Library of Congress)
Scenes in San Francisco, [no. 1] ( Visual )
6 editions published in 1906 in English and held by 130 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The following is a scene-by-scene description of the film: [Frame: 0100] The camera, positioned at the southwest corner of Mission and 5th streets, makes a hurried and jerky pan from the east side of 5th Street eastward to the south side of Mission Street. At the start of the pan, the ruined Lincoln School building is seen, with the dark profile of the Flood Building behind it on Market Street. The camera pans right on a long row of windows in the ruined west wall of the Emporium department store [0130]. The tent in the foreground is probably a temporary "office" of the business formerly on the site. The pan continues further right and looks northeast down Mission Street. [0338] The Rialto Building stands in the distance. The camera pans farther right, to another tent and a sign -- "Safes opened 105 5th Street" [0420]. Many safes fused shut in the heat of the fire and others had to be cooled for weeks before being opened. [0441] The camera is at the southwest corner of 4th and Market streets, looking northeast across Market Street in afternoon light. The Mutual Savings Bank (two blank walls) is in the background at Geary/Kearny and Market streets. The street traffic is part of the afternoon commute down Market Street to the Ferry Building. [0485] Note the heavily-laden wagon (perhaps containing a family's possessions) and the Sanitary Laundry Company wagon. [1638] The camera captures a traffic jam on Market Street. The view is probably north, across Market Street just east of California Street, in the afternoon. The laying of streetcar tracks along this section of Market Street may be the cause of the bottleneck. [1835] The view is northwest, near the southwest corner of East and Market streets, just west of the Ferry Building. A heavily-laden streetcar approaches the Ferry Building. [1908] Note the beggar on crutches. [2075] In the hazy background are Nob Hill and the south slope of Russian Hill (right). [2135] The view is approximately the same as the previous segment, with a streetcar beginning its run up Market Street. [2814] Note the sailor patrolling with fixed bayonet. In the hazy distance unburnt dwellings on the summit of Russian Hill are visible. Nob Hill is in the distance, with the rectangular silhouette of the Fairmont Hotel. [3000] In this very brief scene the camera focuses on workers removing debris. The view is east on Mission Street between 4th and 3rd streets, just east of St. Patrick's Church, part of which is visible at left. [3075] The camera pans to show the demolition of the facade of St. Patrick's Church. The camera is southwest of the church on Mission Street between 4th and 3rd streets. After a brief view of ruins along Market Street, the camera pans right (eastward) past two men near a fire engine [3270], to the church facade being demolished [3957]. Of particular interest is the cameraman seen in the foreground filming the action. He is photographing the film titled San Francisco Earthquake and Fire, April 18, 1906
President McKinley's funeral cortege at Washington, D.C ( Visual )
4 editions published in 1901 in English and held by 121 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
From a contemporary Edison film company catalog: PRESIDENT McKINLEY'S FUNERAL CORTEGE AT WASHINGTON, D.C. When photographing the funeral of President McKinley we secured an excellent position at the foot of Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., having had the exclusive right for animated picture apparatus inside the lines. Our camera is focused looking up Pennsylvania Avenue and shows countless thousands of mourning people who line the streets along the way. As the funeral procession which accompanies the body of our martyred President approaches, our camera is set in motion and pictures of the marching multitude who pay the last tribute to President McKinley at our National Capitol are recorded in the following order. The line is headed by a troop of U.S. Cavalry, followed by detachments of heavy artillery [end of part 1]; then comes the Loyal Legion, followed by G. A. R. detachments, made up of both Federal and Confederate veterans. Next in order comes the Guard of Honor [end of part 2], who are in turn followed by the hearse, which is drawn by six black-plumed and black-netted horses. Inside the hearse can be seen the flag covered casket. The light and color of the procession is suddenly gone; spectators silently bow and bare their heads. The pageant has suddenly been transformed into a funeral cortege. Our position was so excellent that as the hearse passed our camera a distinct and life-size view was procured, showing this vehicle of sadness in all its detail. The hearse is closely followed by the Admirals of the Navy and the Generals of the Army. Next in order come the carriages of the family and the relatives, and then the carriage of President Roosevelt, which is drawn by four black horses. Next come the carriages which contain the President's Cabinet, the Diplomatic Corps, Chief Justice Fuller and Associate Justices, Senators, Congressman, Governors of States and Government Officials. These carriages are followed by the United States Marine Band, which forms a most imposing spectacle as it marches slowly and solemnly to the strains of "Nearer My God to Thee." Following the United States Marine Band and in step with the slow funeral march comes the National Guard of the District of Columbia and sailors from United States Battleships, clad in their natty uniforms and jackey hats. The sailors and soldiers are marching sixteen abreast and make a very imposing spectacle as they pass our camera [sequence from the Marine Band to sailors appears in part 2]. The procession having passed, the crowd immediately surges toward the Capitol, intent on securing a place in the line that they may enter the rotunda and look upon the face of the illustrious President McKinley. Our panoramic device is then set in motion and a most perfect and interesting picture is secured as an ending to the Washington film. The picture shows the immense crowds surging toward the Capitol, and as rain begins falling at that moment tens of thousands of umbrellas are raised for protection. Our camera having been above the heads of the people, a most novel effect is secured. As the camera rotates, the base and steps of the Capitol are brought into view and the crowd is shown crushing and struggling for entrance to the rotunda. One of the most perfect of the McKinley funeral pictures
Funeral leaving the President's house and church at Canton, Ohio ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1901 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
From a contemporary Edison film company catalog: PRESIDENT McKINLEY'S BODY LEAVING THE HOUSE AND CHURCH. Ungowning. [code for telegraphic orders]. In this picture we show a most perfect view of the front entrance of the McKinley home in the background. The hearse which is to bear the President's body to its last resting place drives into view. President Roosevelt's Cabinet forms in line on either side of the walk. The Admirals of the Navy and the Generals of the Army form lines in their rear. President Roosevelt takes his place at the head of the Cabinet and immediately the body emerges from the front door, borne on the shoulders of the soldiers and sailors. As it passes through the lines of Diplomats, Admirals and Generals, all heads are uncovered. The sailors and soldiers descend the steps slowly to the sidewalk and then the body is placed in the hearse. Here we secured another life size view. The hearse starts slowly away and President Roosevelt and his Cabinet walk toward their carriages. Then with the aid of our panoramic device we followed the hearse until it passed slowly out of view down Market Street. This scene dissolves into a picture of the body leaving the church at Canton borne on the shoulders of the sailors and soldiers and placed again in the hearse. From the time the casket appears at the church door it does not pass out of the view of our camera until the doors of the hearse are closed upon it. We follow it constantly with our panoramic device, and the views are perfect and life size. The hearse finally starts away for the cemetery, followed by the famous Black Horse Cavalry, Troop A, of Ohio. Class A 200 ft. $30.00
Panorama of Blackwell's Island, N.Y ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1903 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This film was photographed from a boat heading south along the eastern shore of Blackwell's Island (known today as Roosevelt Island). The island lies in the East River, between Manhattan (which can be seen in the background) and Long Island City, Queens. It is approximately one and three-quarters of a mile long, extending from 51st Street to 88th, and at the time of the filming was the location for a number of New York City's charitable and penal institutions. The film opens showing the lighthouse at the north end of the island (Hallet's Cove) [Frame: 0186]. As the boat enters the east channel of the river, the stacks of a large brewery on Manhattan are visible in the distance [0542]. The camera pans along the island's granite seawall (built by inmates of the Penitentiary and Workhouse) and the following buildings, in order of appearance, are shown: the New York City Lunatic Asylum [0956]; the Workhouse [1274]; the Almshouse [1524]; piers for the Queensborough (or 59th Street) Bridge, which upon completion in 1908 will span 135 feet above the island [2388]; the Almshouse Keeper's House (originally the home of the Blackwell family, who had once owned the island) [2730]; the Penitentiary [3646]; Charity Hospital [4140]. The film ends before reaching the southern tip of the island
Taking President McKinley's body from train at Canton, Ohio ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1901 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
From a contemporary Edison film company catalog: BODY LEAVING THE TRAIN AT CANTON, OHIO. Ungorgeous. [code for telegraphic orders] Here, as in the other pictures, we secured a most advantageous location, and we present a life-size view of the casket containing the body of President McKinley as it is slowly and carefully taken from the window of the car which bore it from the Capitol to Canton. The casket is placed upon the shoulders of ten stalwart sailors and soldiers and borne to the waiting hearse, followed by President Roosevelt and Cabinet. Class A 60 ft. $9.00
Panorama of Riker's Island, N.Y. ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1903 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The film was photographed from a boat going around Riker's Island. Located on the East River north of Hell Gate between the Bronx and Queens, Riker's Island was the site of a massive New York City landfill operation at the time of the filming (originally eighty-seven acres, by 1939 the size of the island had increased to four hundred acres). The film includes scenes of heavy equipment at work, including pile drivers constructing the seawall and steam shovels unloading rubbish from barges. On one of the steam shovels, a sign reading "Water Front Improvement Co., 220 Broadway, New York" can be distinguished [Frame: 3502]. Near the end of the film, a narrow-gauge steam engine with five open cars loaded with landfill, comes into view [3826]. The island is currently the site of a New York City penitentiary
President McKinley's funeral cortege at Buffalo, N.Y ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1901 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
From a contemporary Edison film company catalog: PRESIDENT McKINLEY'S FUNERAL CORTEGE AT BUFFALO, N.Y. Unglimps. [code for telegraphic orders]. The following series of pictures shows the complete movements of the funeral cortege from President Milburn's house on Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. to the City Hall. Each separate scene as enumerated below dissolves one into the other. The picture will be sold as a complete series with dissolving effects or the separate parts will be sold as described below. This starts with the funeral procession leaving the Milburn house on Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y., headed by the mounted police of Buffalo, followed by Companies I and F, of the 14th U.S. Infantry, under personal command of Major General John R. Brooke. Following them come a company of the 73d Coast Artillery, which was then on duty at the Pan-American Exposition. The National Guard of the State of New York, consisting of picked companies from the 74th and 65th Regiments, were also in line. These march to the music of the 14th United States Infantry Band. The Military Escort was followed by the Naval Contingent given below. Fifty sailors from the United States Gunboat Michigan, under command of Lieut. Minix. After them come the blue jackets with open throat shirts showing their bronze breasts, their loose black neck scarfs and sailor knots, with yellow leggings and jackey hats [end of part 1]. Immediately following the sailors come the carriages containing President Roosevelt, U.S. Senator Mark Hanna, Senator Chauncey Depew, President Milburn, of the Pan-American Exposition, and Secretary Cortelyou, and following these is the hearse containing the body of the President drawn by four black horses and escorted by sixteen sailors and marines from the U.S. Gunboat Michigan. President McKinley's hearse is followed by many carriages containing officials and mourners. Immediately the funeral cortege passed out of view, our circular panoramic device was put into motion and a panoramic view of the Milburn house, where President McKinley died, was secured. The vast crowds are also shown in the picture, with the press and military tents in the background [end of part 2; part 3 not described]. Class A 250 ft. $37.50 125 foot strip of the above, Class A (Unglued), $18.75. 50 ft. strip panorama of Milburn's house, Class A (Ungluing), $7.50
McKinley's funeral entering Westlawn Cemetery, Canton [Ohio] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1901 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
From a contemporary Edison film company catalog: FUNERAL CORTEGE ENTERING WESTLAWN CEMETERY AT CANTON, OHIO. Ungraceful. [code for telegraphic orders]. Another of our cameras is in an excellent position at the entrance to the Westlawn Cemetery, Canton, Ohio, and as the funeral procession approaches, it is set in motion. The first to appear in this scene is the Black Horse Cavalry, Troop A, of Cleveland, Ohio, followed by the G.A.R. escort, the members of which make an impressive picture as they march with bared heads. Then comes the hearse, on either side of which march the Admirals of the Navy and the Generals of the Army. The hearse is followed by the carriages of the family and friends, then comes the National Guard of Ohio, including the famous First Regiment of Cincinnati. Following them come the sailors of the United States Navy and the heavy artillery. Our picture was taken at such a point that it shows the troops executing a right wheel as they turn into the cemetery gate, and everything is life size as it passes in front of our camera
Arrival of McKinley's funeral train at Canton, Ohio ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1901 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
From a contemporary Edison film company catalog: FUNERAL TRAIN ARRIVING AT CANTON STATION. In recording this scene the position of our camera was an excellent one, and we present to the public a most perfect picture of the train's arrival. The engine is decorated with crepe to mark the solemnity of this great historical event. As the train stops at the platform great respect for the dead President is shown by the waiting diplomats and reception committee baring their heads and standing respectfully on one side as the mourners leave the train
Panoramic view of the President's house at Canton, Ohio ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1901 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
From a contemporary Edison film company catalog: CIRCULAR PANORAMA OF PRESIDENT McKINLEY'S HOUSE. Here we present probably the most interesting and valuable of the McKinley funeral series. Our camera is located opposite the McKinley home on Market Street, Canton, at 9 A.M. on the day of the funeral, September 19th, 1901. As the camera revolves, immense crowds of people who are slowly passing the house come into view. The soldiers of the National Guard of the State of Ohio are everywhere visible. In the center of the film we present an absolutely perfect view of the McKinley home and at the front door can be seen a soldier and a sailor on guard. The camera continues revolving until the McKinley house passes out of view and the strip ends with the camera looking down Market Street toward the Court House
A street Arab ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1898 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
From a contemporary Edison Company catalog: A STREET ARAB. Umreichen [code for telegraphic orders]. Shows one of New York's street gamins going through various acrobatic evolutions; he turns handsprings backward and forward, walks the crab, does cart wheels and other kindred feats. An exceptionally unique part of the performance is his standing on his head and twisting around like a top. It is safe to say he will be bald-headed at an early age. 50 feet
America at work, America at leisure motion pictures from 1894-1915 ( Visual )
in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Collection of motion pictures covering work, school, and leisure activities in the United States from 1894 to 1915. Features films of the United States Postal Service from 1903, cattle breeding, fire fighters, ice manufacturing, logging, calisthenic and gymnastic exercises in schools, amusement parks, boxing, expositions, football, parades, swimming, and other sporting events
Theodore Roosevelt his life and times on film ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Derived from the Theodore Roosevelt Association Collection and the Paper Print Collection of the Motion Picture, Broadcasting, and Recorded Sound Division at the Library of Congress, presents 104 films that document the events in Theodore Roosevelt's life from the Spanish-American War in 1898 to his death in 1919. Features selected bibliography, timeline, film chronology, and four sound recordings of Roosevelt stating his progressive political views
The last days of a president films of McKinley and the Pan-American Exposition, 1901 ( Visual )
in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Presents twenty-eight films from the Paper Print Collection of the Library of Congress. Produced by the Edison Manufacturing Company from March to November 1901, these actuality motion pictures feature footage of President William McKinley at his second inauguration; the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, New York; McKinley at the Pan-American Exposition; and McKinley's funeral. Links to a section of The Learning Page covering the subjects of United States history, critical thinking, and arts and humanities as they relate to the collection
Early motion pictures of world's fairs & expositions ( Visual )
2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
These films are from the Paper Print Collection at the Library of Congress. The films represent views of three major fairs and expositions of the early film era: The Exposition Universelle of 1900 in Paris, the Pan-American Exposition of 1901 in Buffalo, and the Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904 in St. Louis. Also included are two early films from Luna Park at Coney Island and a reenactment of the Boer War shot in 1905 at Brighton Beach in Brooklyn
Execution of Czolgosz, with panorama of Auburn Prison ( Visual )
2 editions published in 1901 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A reenactment of the execution of Leon Czolgosz, President McKinley's assassin, in the electric chair of the Auburn, N.Y. prison
New York police parade, June 1st, 1899 ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1899 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The film shows members of "New York's Finest" parading at a crowded Union Square. There are members of the Bicycle Squad, mounted horses, and two regimental marching bands. At the time of filming, the New York City Police Department was still recovering from the corruption scandals of the early 1890's that had severely tarnished the reputation of the department. A State Senate appointed group known as the Lexow Committee investigated the department and issued a scathing report that detailed serious criminal activity within the department. In 1895, public opinion was so low that the annual parade wasn't held. That same year, Theodore Roosevelt was appointed president of the Police Board, and he is credited with initiating strict and effective reform measures that helped restore the public's confidence in the police
Bargain day, 14th Street, New York ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1905 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The film shows hundreds of tightly packed people crowding into the front door of the Rothschild Co. 5 and 10 cent store. They are so closely packed it is difficult to tell one from another. The view is from across the street, looking down from the 2nd floor
Panorama of esplanade by night ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1901 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The first objects visible in this film, which was taken at night, are the glowing light globes that outline the buildings closest to the camera position. The camera slowly pans, encompassing the complete area of the exhibit buildings, and the outlines of all the buildings are clearly discernible. Edwin S. Porter maintained that this was the first motion picture taken at night by incandescent light in America
President Roosevelt at the Canton station ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1901 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
From a contemporary Edison film company catalog: PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT AT THE CANTON STATION. Ungoverned. [code for telegraphic orders]. In this picture we show President Roosevelt and Cabinet standing at the station with bare heads, while the casket of President McKinley is being placed in the hearse. As the hearse leaves the station the President and his Cabinet start for their carriages. Our panoramic device is here started and this picture finishes with a circular panorama of the Canton station and Public Square. The picture here presented of President Roosevelt is the best one ever recorded. He is very close to the camera and shown life size and can be instantly recognized. $13.50
 
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Alternative Names
Library of Congress. Paper Print Collection
Languages
English (36)