WorldCat Identities

Magee, John L.

Overview
Works: 21 works in 21 publications in 1 language and 22 library holdings
Genres: Caricatures and cartoons 
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  John L Magee Publications about John L Magee
Publications by  John L Magee Publications by John L Magee
Most widely held works by John L Magee
Soliciting a vote ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1852 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A cynical view of party competition for the working man's vote in the presidential campaign of 1852. In a polling place, four candidates struggle to force their own election ticket on a short, uncouth-looking character in a long coat. The latter holds a whip, suggesting that he is either a New York cabman or a farmer. The candidates are (left to right): Whig senator from Massachusetts Daniel Webster, Texas Democrat Sam Houston, Illinois Democrat Stephen A. Douglas, and Whig general Winfield Scott. The cartoon must have been produced before the June 5 nomination of dark-horse Franklin Pierce as the Democratic candidate, as Pierce is not shown. Webster: "My honest friend, these men are interested parties, I have no further interest in this matter myself, than the inclination to 'Serve my beloved Country,' My Family cannot subsist on less than 25,000 $ a year." His comment may refer to his own personal financial straits or to the nepotism involved in securing his son Fletcher's lucrative appointment as surveyor of the Port of Boston in 1850. Scott (in uniform, grasping the man's coat): "My good Friend, allow me to present you this Ticket, I am 'Old Genl. Scott' you know me, I licked the British & the Mexicans, if elected I shall probably lick all Europe." Houston: "This is the 'Ticket' for you, my good friend, I am 'Old Sam Houston' if elected I shall not only 'lick all of Europe,' but all 'Creation' to boot." Douglas (his arms around the man): "There, there, go away, go away, don't worry the man, leave him to me, leave him to me." Affixed to the wall at right are two posters or signs marked "DEMT." and "WHIG." In the left background stands Henry Clay leaning against a chair observing the scene, along with President Millard Fillmore who looks in through a window
Soloque. Emperor of Hayti, creating a grand duke ( Visual )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Shall I vote for ten cents a day? ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1856 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
A campaign parody somewhat favorable to Republican candidate John C. Fremont, but suggesting a conspiracy between Fremont and Millard Fillmore to defeat Democrat James Buchanan. Buchanan's nickname "Ten Cent Jimmy" was a derisive label applied to him by labor interests. In the background behind a fence Buchanan can be seen addressing a working-class gathering. "Gent[leme]n," he harangues them, "if you put me in, why I promise that you shall be on the same plan as the laborers of Europe, Ten Cents a Day." Fillmore crouches this side of the fence, watching. Fremont, with a carpenter's tools and smock, and shirtsleeves rolled, stands in the foreground. Fillmore (aside, to Fremont): "Monte, I've got my eye up on the old Buck--with such a crowd as he's got, he can't go in, I'll Bargain with you? If I can't win, why you shall." Fremont: "All right, agreed and if I don't win why you shall, but look here, If Ten Cent Jimmy wins we working men will have Ten Cents a Day. How are we to live? look at the price of provisions." To the left is a "Cheap grocery & provision store" offering pork at ten to eighteen cents per pound, "Fine Buck" at two and a half cents, cabbages at ten to twelve and a half cents each, and other produce at equally high rates. At right is the boardinghouse of "Mrs Woodbee Late Pierce" (no doubt a disparaging reference to Democratic incumbent Franklin Pierce) offering rooms to mechanics at three dollars per week. A scrawny dog barks at the door
The gladiators of the Senate! The bulley's of the House ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1852 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The artist parodies recent outbreaks of violence in Congress, and offers a pointed comparison between the elevated rhetorical sparring in the Senate and a more physical brand of combat in the House of Representatives. In the left frame members of the Senate (wearing the togas of Roman senators) watch a bout of swordplay between Alabama Democrat Jeremiah Clemens (here "Clements") and South Carolina Democrat Robert Barnwell Rhett. Clemens lunges blindly at his opponent with his sword while covering his face with a shield marked "Valor." Rhett crouches on the floor beneath his own shield, labeled "Piety." Prominent among the onlookers is Missouri senator Lewis Cass who comments, "The Gladiator from South Carolina is certainly one of the most 'talented' men in the 'Dodging Line' our Country has produced--it's astonishing what practice enables us to accomplish." An unidentified senator exclaims, "Admirable! Admirable! what Suppleness and determination. I fearlessly assert that never in this Chamber has the 'Pious Dodge' been better executed." Another unidentified spectator adds, "Very prettilly done! that dodge was about as neatly executed as anything of the kind I have lately seen." In the second frame two "Bulley's of the House" (one probably Albert Gallatin Brown) fight before a gallery of spectators. Two spectators stand on a bench exclaiming, "Let them fight it out and dont let your anxiety make you perspire to freely. Here--Boy? go and ge me a glass of Brandy & some Crackers & Cheese. we may as well have a pleasent time of it--I bet a Hundred to one Brown whips his man in three minutes" and "Shame!!--Shame!! Where's the Sergeant at Arms!"
The poor soldier & his ticket for soup ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1852 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The presidential aspirations of Whig general Winfield Scott during the 1852 election are again belittled. Scott, in a tattered uniform and supporting himself on a crutch, extends his feathered cap toward the figure of Columbia or Liberty, who stands in the doorway of the "Capitol" holding a liberty cap and staff. Liberty asks Brother Jonathan, who is seated on a small mound beside the doorway, "Jonathan? what does that old fellow want." Jonathan replies, pointing toward Scott, "He's come for his Ticket for--Soup!!" In the background at left is the White House, which has been relabeled "Soup House." (For the origin of the soup joke, see "Distinguished Military Operations with a Hasty Bowl of Soup, "no. 1846-15.)
The game-cock & the goose ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1852 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
A pro-Whig cartoon showing rival candidates Winfield Scott and Franklin Pierce in a race for the presidency in 1852 before an audience of animated spectators. Scott, in uniform and looking uncharacteristically trim, rides a giant gamecock. He is clearly in the lead here, and tips his hat to Pierce, taunting, "What's the matter, Pierce? feel "Faint? " ha! ha! ha! lord what a "Goose!" don't you wish you had my "Cock?" well good bye, Pierce, good bye." Pierce, also in uniform, but riding a large goose, replies, "O dear me! I shall "Faint," I know I shall "Faint," its "Constitutional!"" The added emphasis on the word "Constitutional" suggests that there is a pun intended. The reference to Pierce fainting stems from the Battle of Churubusco in the Mexican War when Pierce, suffering from earlier combat injuries, collapsed unconscious and was carried from the field. The goose was an unflattering symbol also associated with Pierce's Democratic predecessor James K. Polk. (See "Sold for Want of Use," no. 1844-37.)
The sad parting between two old friends ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1851 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Senators Thomas Hart Benton and Henry S. Foote are paired here in a facetious farewell scene, as Benton departs the "Shop of the Senate." In reality Benton lost his Senate seat in a January 1851 election, largely because of his refusal to honor the Missouri Resolutions on Slavery (also known as the Jackson-Napton Resolutions of 1849). He charged that the resolutions were engineered by John C. Calhoun, Foote, and a few other Senate foes. Benton's term ended on March 3. In the center stands Benton dressed as a ragged Irishman, a stock character common in Yankee theatre productions of the New York stage at the time. He smokes a cigar, and stands near a mangy donkey which is laden with saddle, pack, and whip, a bundle marked "Life & Times of Thos H. Benton [bound] for California" at his feet. His California destination has several possible explanations. It may be an oblique allusion to Benton's antislavery stance, as Benton was embroiled in the dispute during his last Senate term, on the admission of California to the Union as a free state. He was also a prominent advocate of a transcontinental railroad. Also likely is the artist's association of the recent California Gold Rush with Benton's career-long bullionist ideology. Benton looks left and shakes the hand of Foote, who is dressed as a New York fireman or street tough, with a visored cap and boots. Foote: "So, yer goin ter leave us, ha Benton? well if I had my Pocket Hankercher about me I'de cry." Benton: "Thank yer Foote! any other time will do, the fact is I won't work in no Shop where the Boss is all the time a findin fault with me work, & the Fellers in the Shop is all the time a Laughin at me." At the far left Calhoun and two others watch from a window with the sign "Cabinet Work." Weitenkampf dates the print 1850. But it is unlikely that it appeared long before the March 3, 1851, expiration of Benton's term in the Senate
The Clay statue. A model of a man. Designed by the goddess of liberty ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1850 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The artist lionizes Kentucky senator Henry Clay, author of the Compromise of 1850, and slams his political foes and critics of the compromise, particularly those in the Taylor administration. A text in the lower margin reads: "A Fable--In the Reign of Zackery 1st the Goddess of Liberty Designed a Statue. a Model of a Man which she exhibited before the King, his Ministers, & the People. the Beauty of the Statue Elicited such shouts of Approbation from the People that the King's Ministers fired with Jealousy determined to Destroy it, but after many Ineffectual attempts were obliged to Desist amidst the Laughter of the Court & the People." The King is clearly President Taylor, who sits on a throne at the far left, in uniform and holding a sword instead of a scepter. A spittoon is on the floor before him, and a black court jester crouches beside the throne holding a copy of the newspaper the "Republic." A larger-than-life statue of Henry Clay, in armor and holding a shield inscribed "Compromise" and a sword, stands in the center of the scene. Clay's sword bears the words, "I fight for my Country! Traitors Beware." The statue towers over the figures that surround it, which include Taylor cabinet members Reverdy Johnson, George W. Crawford, and Thomas Ewing (on the right) and Secretary of State John M. Clayton (on the left). Crawford and Ewing regard the broken ax and saw which they hold in their hands. Crawford (to Johnson): "Look here Just see what a great Big Piece Ive Broke of my Gulpin Ax. I'll send in a Gulpin Claim for this. Valuable Ax this." The allusion is to Crawford's lucrative and questionable role as counsel for the Galphin family's successful suit against the federal government, an arrangement which provoked heated criticism in the press. The controversy over this Taylor administration scandal reached its peak in April, May and June of 1850. Johnson: "The Ax, was Broke before you used it, however, you Lie & I'll Swear to it, & we'll Pockett the Plunder between us." Ewing: "Why Ive Broke nearly all the teeth of my Chickensaw against this Infernall Statue. I'le send in a Big Claim for this." Clayton gestures entreatingly to Taylor: "Why the Devil dont your Imperial Majesty assist us, I can assure your Majesty, it's much Easier discharging a Bullitt, from a Republic, than it is injuring this Statue." Journalist Alexander C. Bullitt was a Taylor advisor and, beginning in 1849, editor of the administration organ the Washington "Republic." Bullitt appears here as the black court fool. Taylor hugs to his chest the tiny figure of New York senator William H. Seward, who sits on his lap. Seward was an insider in the short-lived Taylor administration, and a vigorous opponent of the Compromise of 1850. Taylor says, "Consider the weight of my Crown, Dear Clayton. besides my sick Baby, little Billey, requires, all my Care. moreove as the People like the Statue, I'de rather not Compromise myself, in the matter. assume the Responsibility Yourself, you'r used to it." Just to the right of the throne stand (left to right) senators Thomas Hart Benton, Daniel Webster, and Henry S. Foote. Benton: "Why its a Miserable Statue. a wretched abortion, the inscriptions on the Sword & Shield are in very Bad Taste, very Bad Taste indeed." Benton was an adamant critic of the Compromise. Foote (to Webster): "I think its a Splendid Statue. Which Party do you go for." Webster: "The Party thats likely to win. Of Course, I shall Keep one eye on the Statue, & the other on the Chair, & act according to circumstances." Senator Lewis Cass stands to the right of Foote, in the background, saying, "I rather like the Inscription on the Shield." Clay does, however, have some friends here. On the far right is a crowd of people led by the figure of Liberty, a young maiden in a classical gown holding a staff and liberty cap. She addresses Johnson and the others, "Gentlemen! I made this Statue as a Model of a Man. now though it is only of Clay & I wafted it here in a Breath, still with all your efforts, you can neither move it from its Base, or inflict the slightest Injury upon it. its innate strenght [sic] will defy all your Puny attempts." Liberty's followers enjoin, "Why I think it's a Beautifull Statue," and "So do I! Hurrah! for the Clay Statue." "The Clay Statue," though tentatively dated 1849 by Weitenkampf, must have appeared in 1850, certainly after Henry Clay's presentation of the compromise in January and probably as late as the spring, at the height of the Galphin controversy
The modern Gilpins. Love's labor lost ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1848 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
A parody of Democratic politics in the months preceding the party's 1848 national convention. Specifically, the artist ridicules the rivalry within the party between Free Soil or anti-slavery interests, which upheld the Wilmot Proviso, and regular, conservative Democrats or "Hunkers." The "Gilpins" (named after the hero of William Cowper's 1785 "Diverting History of John Gilpin," who also loses control of his mount, to comic effect) are regular Democrats Lewis Cass, Thomas Hart Benton, and Levi Woodbury, who ride a giant sow down "Salt River Lane" away from the "Head Quarters of the Northern Democracy," which displays a Liberty cap and a flag "Wilmot Proviso." Cass, a former general and avid expansionist, wears a military uniform and brandishes a sword "Annexation." John Van Buren (right), a Free Soil Democrat, tries to restrain the pig by holding its tail. He remarks, "This is our last hope. If the tail draws out, they are gone for good." A man at left tries to block the pig's passage shouting "Stop, stop, Old Hunkers! here's the house!" Cass orders, "Clear the road. Don't you see that we are fulfilling our manifest destiny!" Benton asserts, "We are not a whit inclined to tarry there." On the far right a stout gentleman chases after them calling, "Hey! hey, there! where upon airth are you going? Come back here to your quarters!" Meanwhile former President and Free Soil contender Martin Van Buren is neck-deep in a pool at the lower right. He laments, "Had I served my country with half the zeal with which I served my illustrious predecessor, I should not thus have slumped in the mud." He refers to his service under Andrew Jackson, whom he succeeded as President. Attribution of "The Modern Gilpins" to John L. Magee is based on its similarities in draftsmanship and facial characterizations to Magee's 1850 satire "The Clay Statue," (no. 1850-9) and to several Mexican War prints he executed for the publisher Baillie
Shall I vote for ten cents a day? ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1856 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Print shows a campaign parody somewhat favorable to Republican candidate John C. Fremont, but suggesting a conspiracy between Fremont and Millard Fillmore to defeat Democrat James Buchanan. Buchanan's nickname "Ten Cent Jimmy" was a derisive label applied to him by labor interests. In the background, behind a fence, Buchanan can be seen addressing a working-class gathering. "Gent[leme]n," he harangues them, "if you put me in, why I promise that you shall be on the same plan as the laborers of Europe, Ten Cents a Day." Fillmore crouches this side of the fence, watching. Fremont, with a carpenter's tools and smock, and shirtsleeves rolled, stands in the foreground. Fillmore (aside, to Fremont): "Monte, I've got my eye up on the old Buck--with such a crowd as he's got, he can't go in, I'll Bargain with you? If I can't win, why you shall." Fremont: "All right, agreed and if I don't win why you shall, but look here, If Ten Cent Jimmy wins we working men will have Ten Cents a Day. How are we to live? look at the price of provisions." To the left is a "Cheap grocery & provision store" offering pork at ten to eighteen cents per pound, "Fine Buck" at two and a half cents, cabbages at ten to twelve and a half cents each, and other produce at equally high rates. At right is the boardinghouse of "Mrs Woodbee Late Pierce" (no doubt a disparaging reference to Democratic incumbent Franklin Pierce) offering rooms to mechanics at three dollars per week. A scrawny dog barks at the door
The Sad parting between two old friends by John L Magee ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1852 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Subject: Cartoon depicting Senator Thomas H. Benton in tattered clothes, smoking a cigar. He shakes the hand of Henry S. Foote as he leaves the "Shop of the Senate" with his donkey and the "Life and times of Thos. H. Benton for California." At left, John C. Calhoun and two others look out of a window with the sign "Cabinet work" above it. Dialogue below: Foote "So, yer goin ter leave us, ha Benton? Well if I had my pocket handkercher about me I'd cry." Benton replies "Thank yer Foote! Any othertime will do, the fact is I wont work in no shop where the boss is all the time a findin fault with me work, & the fellers in the shop is all the time a laughin at me."
The forty thieves or the common scoundrels of New-York ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1840 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The title continues: "Breaking up of a Grand Spree in the Tea Room & total abflustification of the common scoundrels." Weitenkampf calls the print a satirical look at members of the New York Common Council "after a spree of eating and drinking," and cites two others by Elton. The artist also suggests corruption in that Tammany-controlled civic body, a center of Democratic power in 1840. It is a crowded scene of drunken merriment. In the foreground are several comical figures in various attitudes, including a reeling heavy-set man who says, "I'm affraid I've not done me juty to me w-a-r-d this evening, let me see what I've had: three Oyster stews . . . " He leans on a smaller man who says, "Don't make yourself uneasy Sir, if you havent done your duty on this occassion, I would like to see the man who has & if there is such a man all I want is his Daguerreotype Likeness to hang on the inside of my shirt to remember him by . . ." (Daguerreotypes were first introduced in 1839, and portrait studios had opened in several major cities in the United States by early 1840.) On the right two others converse. One, with a bulbous red nose, lifts his glass aloft. The second holds a bag marked "40,000." The first says, "Ah! that's the talk! let me see with that amount of stuff, I can cut out forty pairs of pantaloons with a thousand sets of trimmings for each man, o yes Sir depend on it, the documents shall be forthcoming!" The second, "Here is the Stuff for pantaloons & I hope now you will put that matter through & let me have the contract without delay." In the middle ground left a black manservant holds a tray of cups before the open door to a "Tea Room."
The buck chase of 1856 ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1856 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Democratic candidate James Buchanan, as a buck deer, crosses the finish line of a racecourse ahead of competitors Millard Fillmore and John C. Fremont. Spectators cheer in the stands behind. Fillmore appears as an emaciated horse, fallen on the course. Next, Fremont follows close on the heels of Buchanan. Fremont stands astride two horses: one with the head of New York "Tribune" editor Horace Greeley and the other the "wooly nag" of abolitionism. The latter here more closely resembles a filly than a nag. Greeley: "Monte why didn't you lean more on the wooly horse--you gave me all your weight--never mind we've beat the grey Filly [i.e., Fillmore] next time we'ill head off that hard old Buck." Fremont: "Get out--hang you and the Wooly Horse--I could beat that broken down silver grey "Filly" and the old Buck too--had I gone on my own hook." Fillmore: "Oh! Oh! why did'nt I stay in sweet Italy with my friend King Bomba and the lazy Neapolitans--Then I should not have been blowen up like a Bag of wind in this Chase." Buchanan: "Never mind Gentn. I could not "help" beating you, the American Nation wished it so--I will send you all to Ostend--and I promise you that I will have no Tailors in my white House. [As a youth Fillmore had been apprenticed to a tailor.] Mercy on me! to think that this Glorious People should be almost Pierced to Death [a reference to unpopular Democratic incumbent Franklin Pierce] by War and making Free States in this land of Liberty by a set of Fashion inventores 'I'll none of it.'"
The forty thieves or the common scoundrels of New York by John L Magee ( Visual )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Weitenkampf calls the print a satirical look at members of the New York Common Council "after a spree of eating and drinking," and cites two others by Elton. The artist also suggests corruption in that Tammany-controlled civic body, a center of Democratic power in 1840. It is a crowded scene of drunken merriment. In the foreground are several comical figures in various attitudes, including a reeling heavy-set man who says, "I'm affraid I've not done me juty to me w-a-r-d this evening, let me see what I've had: three Oyster stews... " He leans on a smaller man who says, "Don't make yourself uneasy Sir, if you havent done your duty on this occassion, I would like to see the man who has & if there is such a man all I want is his Daguerreotype Likeness to hang on the inside of my shirt to remember him by..." (Daguerreotypes were first introduced in 1839, and portrait studios had opened in several major cities in the United States by early 1840.) On the right two others converse. One, with a bulbous red nose, lifts his glass aloft. The second holds a bag marked "40,000." The first says, "Ah! that's the talk! let me see with that amount of stuff, I can cut out forty pairs of pantaloons with a thousand sets of trimmings for each man, o yes Sir depend on it, the documents shall be forthcoming!" The second, "Here is the Stuff for pantaloons & I hope now you will put that matter through & let me have the contract without delay." In the middle ground left a black manservant holds a tray of cups before the open door to a "Tea Room."
The fox without a tail ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1861 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
A satire on South Carolina's role as instigator of secessionism in the South. The artist may be lampooning the convention of seceded states which assembled at Montgomery, Alabama, on February 4, 1861. The prominent leaders of the Confederate states are portrayed as foxes. The chief fox (the one "without a tail") is South Carolina governor Francis Pickens. South Carolina was the most radical of the Southern states and the first to leave the Union. Here he tries to entice the others into giving up their tails as well. As the text below puts it, "A cunning fox, having lost his tail in a trap, to save himself from ridicule called a convention of the other foxes and stated to them that having found his tail a great incumbrance he had cut it off, and advised them all to do the same, . . ." Standing on a pedestal supported on the back of a crouching black man, Pickens (center) holds aloft a document "Secession" and says, "All in favor of losing their tails will please say aye contrary no, carried the member from Mississippi will commence operations." The member from Missippi is Jefferson Davis, who stands at right holding a large ax. Before him, with its tail on a block, is a fox "Florida." Davis says (although he doesn't move), "Make ready, take aim, fire! bang!! there she goes slick as a whistle, now then Toombs, your tail if you please, no noise." Georgia secessionist Robert Toombs holds a bowl in front of him, and announces, "After the member from Florida I claim the honor of being the "next Customer." An unidentified man at the far right proclaims, "Until a better substitute is offered, I shal hold on to my tail, that's certain." To the left of Pickens is an ornate table carved with symbols of tyranny and treachery, including a pistol, dagger, crown, whip, and die. On the table rests an inkwell with a statuette of two men fighting with daggers. Behind, two foxes representing Louisiana and Alabama are partly concealed by a large document. On the far left is "Texas," a fox with a foolscap pulled down over its face and holding a musket with bayonet and a liquor bottle. He sings, "Yankee doodle be hanged (hic) Star spangled banner 'hanged, (hic) come lets lick 'er." Another man asks, "In case we cut off our tails and should afterwards repent, is there any description of glue in the market with which we can fasten them on again, and will it stick." In the foreground Buchanan's secretary of the interior Jacob Thompson of Mississippi runs from an emptied safe with a sack of $870,000, saying, "To the victors belong the spoils that good Democractic doctrine." Thompson had resigned the cabinet in 1861. The stolen goods may refer to an episode during his term of office when he was accused of stealing a large sum of money from the Indian funds of the Department of Interior. He was eventually judged innocent of this charge. In the background a fox standing atop a ladder puts a torch to the American flag and eagle
Terrible rout & total destruction of the Whig Party. In Salt River ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1852 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The 1852 Democratic victory under the standard of Franklin Pierce is foreseen as a debacle for the Whig party, led by Winfield Scott. Pierce (center) sits on his horse, holding aloft a banner bearing his and running mate William R. King's names. His troops rally around him--the party rank and file. Scott's forces are in chaos, routed into Salt River, the figurative stream of political disaster. Holding aloft a shredded banner, Scott (center) rides into the water with supporter William Seward holding tight to his horse's neck. Scott says, "Just as I expected, we relied too much on fuss and smoke, and have lost the battle, yet bravely hand in hand together, Seaward (Seward) we go, my Friend, my Brother." To the left, a uniformed man, either William R. King or Illinois Democrat Stephen A. Douglas, boots Whig incumbent president Millard Fillmore into the river, saying, "I like consistency & have ever been in favor of the improvement of Rivers and Harbours. Slide in!" Fillmore laments, "I dont know why they kick me. I'm sure I'm nobody!" In the lower left corner, the feet of abolitionist editor Horace Greeley protrude from the water. In the center, Lewis Cass fires a pistol at Daniel Webster, whose rump, labeled "Chowder" for his New England background, is just disappearing into the water. "Ah what glorious sport," cries Cass, taunting Webster about his diplomatic record, "how now Webster! backing down on guano. fishing for Cod! eh! feel dry! take mine warm. want any powder, give you some ball!" A man to the right of Cass prods at a floating body with a bayonet. Another man, further right, has just forced an unidentified Whig into the water, saying, "There's nothing like water to wash out Stains!" The comic characterizations and style of draftsmanship are unquestionably John L. Magee's, comparing closely with signed works such as "The Game Cock and the Goose" and "A Magnificent Offer to a Magnificent Officer" (nos. 1852-18 and 1852-27)
Soloque. Emperor of Hayti, creating a grand duke ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1850 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Subject: Horizontal print caricaturing the self-made emperor of Haiti and his court. Soulouque wears an elaborate military uniform and a crown. He holds a sword in his right hand and beckons to another man with his left, saying, "Come along niggar, come along, dont be affraid, we's flesh & blood like youself ... now den, I Soloque emqeror [sic] ob Hayti by de autoity in my west do create de, grand duke ob de emqire [sic]." The future grand duke, also in elaborate uniform with large plumes, bows before him as a member of the audience encourages him to bow lower. At right, three figures identified below the image as resident English, American, and French men complain of the smell, the Englishman holding a scent bottle to his nose and the Frenchman retching, and discuss the preference of "colored people" for "monarchial forms & ceremony." At right, a woman identified as the empress slouches low on her throne. A young man in cap and gown is identified as the prime minister
The grand national fight 2 against 1 fought on the 6th of Nov. 1856 for one hundred thousand dollars ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1856 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The familiar metaphor of the presidential contest as a boxing match is invoked once again. (For an earlier example see "Set to Between the Champion Old Tip and the Swell Dutchman of Kinderhook," no. 1836-12.) The scene is set in an open field, roped off behind to make a ring. Republican candidate Fremont (right) squares off against Democrat James Buchanan (left), after the latter has felled American party nominee Millard Fillmore. Buchanan warns Fremont, "Look out now Young Mariposa for that hair on your face I will put in the "Right" when you least expect it!" Fremont replies, "Come to time, Old Buck, I think I can lick a Democrat as old again as you are!" Fremont steps over the fallen Fillmore, who says, "You see, Fremont, I'm down! There must be a good many drops of 'Democrtic Blood' in that arm of Old Buck's to strike such a stunning blow!" Buchanan is seconded by an Irishman (far left) who comments, "By Jabbers but Old Bucky knocks 'em." Fremont is supported by a Bowery type (crouching at far right) who urges him, "Go in wooly Hoss don't be afeard." The print was probably issued in summer 1856 or later in the election campaign, after Fillmore's prospects for victory had dimmed
Satan tempting Booth to the murder of the President by John L Magee ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1865 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Lincoln's assassin, actor John Wilkes Booth, is goaded by a hideous Mephistophelian figure to shoot the unsuspecting President, who is visible in a theater box beyond. Booth stands erect, his left arm behind his back and a small pistol in his right hand. He stares straight ahead, seemingly mesmerized by Satan, who stands close behind him, pointing with one hand at the pistol and with the other at Lincoln. Rays of light issue from the demon's eyes, mouth, and ears. He wears a peacock feather on his head and is clad in a tassled medieval tunic
The morning after the election--November 1856 ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1856 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The victorious James Buchanan sits under a trellis of grape vines, holding reports of election returns on his lap. He reflects, "What a happy morning for my country and myself. Here I find returns for myself & my Kentucky brother [running mate John C. Breckinridge]--beginning with Maine in the North & concluding with Texas in the South. What welcome news to know that the People have not removed a plank of the Democratic Platform. Who will dare breathe Disunion now?" Before him on the ground lie scythes, a shovel, and a pickax; a plough rests nearby. Behind him ripe wheat is visible. On the left, past a low fence, four New York newspaper editors run forward holding up bills for large sums of money. They are a bearded "German editor," Horace Greeley, James Gordon Bennett, and James Watson Webb--frustrated supporters of John C. Fremont, who rides off in the distance saying, "I'm off to Mariposa--Like a foolish fellow, you Editors made me believe papers could do all things--The people you see have used us up. When I get to my gold regions & "back again," I'll pay you "in a horn."" Mosquitoes swarm around him. At right Millard Fillmore emerges from the mouth of a cavern, holding a lantern (a nativist symbol). He confronts Know Nothing founder "Ned Buntline" (Edward Zane Carroll Judson), a bearded man with two pistols at his waist. Fillmore complains, "Oh! Ned! Ned! This is all of your doing. After being a popular Whig President--and walking in the footsteps of Clay, Webster & Cass. I am thrown back by the People into the dark & gloomy caverns of Know Nothingism."
 
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