WorldCat Identities

Whyte, Hamish 1947-

Overview
Works: 64 works in 177 publications in 1 language and 1,882 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Poetry  History  Biography  Interviews  Sources  Periodicals 
Roles: Editor, Author, Other
Classifications: PR6063.O69, 820.809411
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Hamish Whyte
About Edwin Morgan( Book )

8 editions published between 1990 and 1991 in English and held by 180 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Streets of stone : an anthology of Glasgow short stories( Book )

6 editions published between 1985 and 1990 in English and held by 147 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nothing not giving messages : reflections on work and life by Edwin Morgan( Book )

7 editions published between 1990 and 1991 in English and held by 97 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Ghost of Liberace( Book )

7 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 93 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Glasgow observed( Book )

2 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 90 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pig squealing( Book )

9 editions published in 1992 in English and Undetermined and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Scream, if you want to go faster( Book )

8 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The day I met the Queen Mother( Book )

9 editions published between 1990 and 1993 in English and Undetermined and held by 86 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Noise and smoky breath : an illustrated anthology of Glasgow poems, 1900-1983 by Hamish Whyte( Book )

7 editions published between 1983 and 1986 in English and held by 85 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bringing back some brightness : 20 years of New writing Scotland( Book )

9 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 67 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New Writing Scotland is an important fixture on the Scottish literary scene. The first twenty issues drew works from 883 contributors and contain nearly a thousand pieces of writing. Most of the major names are there, from Norman MacCaig, Edwin Morgan, Naomi Mitchison, Iain Crichton Smith among the elders, to Iain Banks, Ian Rankin, A.L. Kennedy, Janice Galloway and Irvine Welsh of the more recent generation. It’s a pretty good roll call and a matter of satisfaction that authors like Galloway, Kennedy and Welsh had some of their first works published in New Writing Scotland. Bringing Back Some Brightness is a celebration of twenty turbulent years of Scottish life and culture
Lunch at Yes( Book )

7 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 66 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

'Lunch at Yes' suggests a number of possibilities. Is it simply a meal at a popular Glasgow restaurant, or an imperative to feast on the positive, or is there some other meaning to be found? Whatever, it's an upbeat title and we hope it is indicative of the good things on offer in this year's anthology of new writing. The recently-introduced process of blind judging of submissions to New Writing Scotland is proving interesting. A few well-known writers who submitted work were not selected, while several new and emergent writers were, many of the latter previously unknown to us. The editors consciously try not to put a name to the work in the preliminary reading, but occasionally the writing is so distinctive the author is not hard to spot. For example, anyone who has ever read an extract from David Neilson’s (unfortunately still unpublished) epic tale Robert the Vole would have no difficulty identifying his work: there is nothing else quite like it. Very often during the selection process themes emerge of their own accord: in this case, food, winter, birds, fish and, given the predilections of the editors, cats of course. But eating and drinking seem to predominate (another editorial partiality? surely not) and so the reader may go to 'Illusions for Coffee', then 'Lunch at Yes', visit 'The Happiest Place to be in Scotland on a Saturday Afternoon', experience 'Nacho-Munchers and Dolly-Grips' at the cinema and have 'Nectarines’ for afters (and don’t forget the ‘Marmite') — or indeed have a whole range of tastes and interests catered for, including the amazing Free Presbyterian Dolphins'. Now there’s a title that can be read in more than one way. As the wonderful waitpersons in Yes say: Enjoy!
Milking the Haggis( Book )

7 editions published between 2000 and 2004 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Welcome -- New Writing Scotland comes of age with its 21st birthday! We had over 1100 submissions, from nearly 400 writers, and have had fun selecting 71 pieces from 52 writers. We were encouraged by the range of writing that emerged and the sheer originality of much of it. We have humorous paeans to carrots and to shell-suits; we have a surreal heron, a leg-fetishist, stigmata, cannibalism and cold-blooded brutality; we have dry humour, gentle psychological probing, and deep compassion for outsiders from other countries or with other mentalities or on the other side of life; we have mainland writing and writing from over the water, from both the Western Isles and from the Northern Isles; by contrast, we also have work inspired by distant Lagos; we have writing that places a powerful emphasis on our sense of hearing; and we have chosen the title, Milking the Haggis, because it encapsulates the intriguing unexpectedness, combined with a sense of Scottishness, that characterises the essence of this anthology. Astute regular readers may have noticed that the contents of at least 14 of the previous twenty NWS volumes have been arranged alphabetically by author. As we are the two most end-of-the-alphabet editors yet, we might like to redress this imbalance on behalf of our alphabetically-challenged fellows -- watch this space! We hope you enjoy this collection and if you were unlucky enough not to be selected for this issue, please don't be put off from submitting to New Writing Scotland 22. As you can see, competition is fierce, and the standard of much that we could not include was also very high. We look forward to reading your work and hope you enjoy reading our choices here
Queen of the sheep( Book )

9 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Forty-eight contributors this year, slightly down on Issue 21, but with about the same number of pieces. Twenty-seven men, twenty-one women: the gender balance is improving. And a good mixture of well-known, up-and-coming and new names. As ever, it's all new writing and the usual wide range of topics and styles that never fails to amaze. We have country and city (source of much humour, gallus and gallows); weather (rain, of course) and seasons; Frank O'Hara in Gaelic and Jock Steinbeck in Canada; a few birds (eider, chicken, wren and Brent Millar's lovebirds); food (regularly on the NWS menu); sheep (not least Jim Carruth's title poem, the latest in his ongoing series of agriverse) and much more. Both of us have been involved with New Writing Scotland since it began and are sorry to be standing down as editors (Hamish this year, Val next year), but we will continue to submit poems and stories as potential contributors (anonymously, of course!). As editors we have thoroughly enjoyed the process – the discovery of exciting new talent is particularly rewarding. Someone once wrote that an editor is ‘nothing more than a highly sensitised reader, the first link in what may be a chain of proliferating impacts.' We’re not sure how highly sensitised we are, but we’re happy to be that first link. The previous issue, Number 22, was a compendium of the first twenty issues (and well-received, we may say) and marked a watershed. Number 23 is the start of the next generation of New Writing Scotland and we hope it will keep going, reinvigorated -- by its publishers, by its editors, by wonderful new work by writers old and new and by you, its readers, the most important link in the chain
The Scottish cat by Hamish Whyte( Book )

8 editions published between 1987 and 2013 in English and held by 56 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Cats have always had a special appeal to poets - not least to Scottish poets, who love their characteristic thrawnness. According to legend, the Scots were the first northern people to keep cats (Fergus I of Scotland is said to have brought one from Portugal in the fourth century BC), and Scots have taken cats to their hearts ever since. This anthology of Scottish cat poems ranges from nursery rhymes to twenty-first century elegies for cats which have run out of lives.--From back cover
Mungo's tongues : Glasgow poems, 1630-1990( Book )

4 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Streets of gold : contemporary Glasgow stories( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Across the water : Irishness in modern Scottish writing( Book )

4 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 50 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

More words : Gael Turnbull on poets and poetry by Gael Turnbull( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A Glasgow collection : essays in honour of Joe Fisher( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An Arran anthology( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Bringing back some brightness : 20 years of New writing Scotland
Languages
English (115)

Covers
Bringing back some brightness : 20 years of New writing ScotlandLunch at YesMilking the HaggisQueen of the sheepMungo's tongues : Glasgow poems, 1630-1990Across the water : Irishness in modern Scottish writingAn Arran anthology