WorldCat Identities

Curtice, John

Overview
Works: 88 works in 212 publications in 1 language and 5,084 library holdings
Genres: History  Periodicals 
Roles: Editor, Author, Other
Classifications: JN956, 324.2410858
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about John Curtice
 
Most widely held works by John Curtice
The rise of New Labour : party policies and voter choices by A. F Heath( )

21 editions published between 2001 and 2005 in English and held by 1,577 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This new work from the well-known team of Heath, Jowell, and Curtice explores the emergence of New Labour from the ruins of old Labour's four successive defeats at the hands of the Conservatives. Based on the authoritative British Election Surveys the book explores some of the key questions about contemporary British elections and the social and political factors that decide their outcomes."--Jacket
Revolution or evolution? : the 2007 Scottish elections by John Curtice( )

11 editions published between 2009 and 2012 in English and held by 1,459 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Looks at the Scottish elections of 2007 and asks: was the outcome of the 2007 Scottish election revolutionary or a natural progression in Scottish Politics?
How Britain votes by Anthony Heath( Book )

15 editions published between 1985 and 1989 in English and Undetermined and held by 540 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

British Social Attitudes 24 by Alison Park( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 335 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"British Social Attitudes remains a beacon of excellence. It has adapted to the times providing a rich and textured guide to who we think we are, what we think and how that has changed"--Financial Times. ' an indispensable tool not just for governments, but also for modern citizens to understand their fellows, and themselves better' - The Times Higher Education Supplement. ' shows what the British people really think, as opposed to what journalists and politicians like to pretend they think' - John Pilger. The annual British Social Attitudes survey is carried out by Britain's largest indepen
Personality politics? : the role of leader evaluations in democratic elections by Marina Costa Lobo( Book )

13 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 252 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Assesses the role that voters''perceptions and evaluations of leaders play in democratic elections. The book presents evidence from an array of countries with diverse historical and institutional contexts, and employs innovative methodologies to determine the importance of leaders in democracies worldwide.--Provided by publishers
Labour's last chance? : the 1992 election and beyond( Book )

8 editions published between 1994 and 1997 in English and held by 188 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New Scotland, new society? : are social and political ties fragmenting?( Book )

7 editions published between 2001 and 2002 in English and held by 136 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This text asks a series of vital questions regarding the attitudes and behaviour of the Scots: are the ties that bind people to each other and to the democratic system fragmenting? Do people no longer trust each other? How do people relate to each other in terms of social trust? How do they relate to social institutions such as the family and systems of morality? Is constitutional reform restoring that trust? Drawing on the Scottish Social Attitudes Survey and its predecessors, the overall aim of the book is to provide an independent account of public opinion in post-devolution Scotland
Has devolution worked? : the verdict from policy makers and the public( Book )

5 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Devolution to Scotland and Wales represented the most fundamental reform of the British state for almost a century. Ten years on, how successful has the reform been? Drawing on the views of citizens, elected representatives and interest groups in Scotland and Wales, this title provides an answer
On message : communicating the campaign by Pippa Norris( )

5 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

To what extent are the techniques of campaigning and media management critical to the outcome of modern elections? This book brings together a group of leading scholars to provide a comprehensive analysis of the role and impact of political communications during election campaigns. They set the context of election campaigning in Britain, and the methodology used to undertand media effects, review party strategies and resulting media coverage, and draw together evidence of the impact of the 1997 British General Election campaign, analyzing how far television and the press media influenced the public's civic engagement, agenda priorities, and party preferences
British General Election Panel Survey, 1992-1997 by A Heath( )

4 editions published in 1999 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The 1992-1997 British Election Panel Survey contacted a sample of registered British electors a total of eight times, the first wave being just after the April 1992 general election and the final wave just after the May 1997 general election. The aim of the study was to investigate individual-level stability and change in political attitudes, economic and social circumstances, and voting behavior over the lifetime of the 1992-1997 Parliament. A wave of data collection was carried out each spring, immediately following the general elections (1992, 1997), local government elections (1993, 1995, 1996), and European Parliament elections (1994). In addition, there were two autumn waves, in 1995 and 1996, both following the party conference season
British General Election Panel Survey, 1986-1987 by A Heath( )

3 editions published between 1996 and 1997 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study, a follow-up to the BRITISH ELECTION STUDY: [JUNE] 1983 (ICPSR 8409), was undertaken to describe and explain the outcome of the 1987 general election in Great Britain. The investigators sought to measure the magnitude and causes of the erosion of enduring support for the two major British political parties, the changing relationship between social stratification and electoral behavior, the pattern and sources of short-term voting change, and the division of opinion over major political issues and their relationships to the party division of the vote. Questions were posed regarding voting behavior in 1987 and general social and political attitudes. Numerous replications of measures used in the 1983 British Election Study were included
British General Election Study : Campaign Panel, 1997 by A Heath( )

3 editions published in 1999 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study was conducted (1) to analyze the interaction between medium-term economic and short-term political factors and the ways in which they determine the outcome of elections, and (2) to explore election campaign dynamics and how the process of modernization and professionalization of campaign communications has affected the role of political leaders, the media, and the political trust and knowledge of voters. For the study, adults aged 17 years and over living in Great Britain (excluding Scotland north of the Caledonian Canal) were surveyed over four waves. Wave A, fielded during spring/summer 1996, consisted of personal interviews with 3,662 respondents. Subsequent waves were conducted through telephone interviews. Wave B, fielded April 1-16, 1997, consisted of interviews with 1,800 respondents, while Wave C, fielded April 17-30, 1997, consisted of interviews with 1,809 respondents. Wave D, conducted during May 1997 after the 1997 election, interviewed 2,047 respondents. Background information on respondents includes age, sex, race, ethnicity, political party, political orientation, number of members in the household, marital status, social class, employment history, health insurance status, citizenship, voter registration status, lottery/gambling participation, household income, and housing and neighborhood conditions ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02619
British Election Study : Cross-Section, 1987 by A Heath( )

2 editions published in 1995 in No Linguistic content and English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This joint project between investigators at Nuffield College, Oxford, and Social and Community Planning Research was designed to yield a representative sample of eligible voters in Great Britain at the time of the 1987 general election. The aim of this research was to collect data with a view to describing and explaining the outcome of general elections and to analyzing long-term changes in political attitudes and behavior. Key concerns of the investigators related to the magnitude and causes of the erosion of support for the two major parties, the changing relationship between social stratification and electoral behavior, the patterns and sources of short-term voting change, and the divisions of opinion over major political issues and their relationship to the party division of the vote. Of the sample of 6,000 names, 3,826 respondents completed personal interviews and 3,414 returned the self-completed supplement. Variables collected cover a multitude of political topics and behaviors as well as general demographic characteristics such as age and sex ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06452
British General Election Panel Survey, 1987-1992 by A Heath( )

2 editions published in 1996 in No Linguistic content and English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study queried respondents to the BRITISH ELECTION STUDY: CROSS-SECTION, 1987 (ICPSR 6452). The main focus was on the political and social attitudes and life experiences of the respondents, such as their political interests and party preferences, opinions on comparisons between various parties, their employment and union affiliations, and life satisfaction. Numerous questions were replications from previous British Election Studies and British Social Attitudes Surveys. This five-wave panel dataset was weighted to compensate to some extent for the effects of differential attrition. The aim was to make the various groups of the respondents at the different panel stages representative of the 1987 cross-sectional sample simply in terms of voting behavior
British General Election Cross-Section Survey, 1997 by A Heath( )

3 editions published in 1999 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

For this cross-section survey, respondents were interviewed following the May 1, 1997, British General Election. A total of 3,615 respondents were successfully interviewed, 882 of them in Scotland. The survey involved personal interviews with a random sample of British adults who were asked to complete a survey supplement following the interview. The aims of the 1997 survey were (1) to compare the voting behavior and issues of identity north and south of the Scottish border, (2) to analyze the interaction among long-term structural trends, medium-term economic and other influences, and short-term political factors, (3) to explore the manner in which those factors influence electoral outcomes, and (4) to draw international comparisons on the impact of electoral institutions on voting behavior and on attitudes toward elections. Fieldwork was conducted in May-August 1997. Topics covered the campaign leading to the 1997 elections, participation in 1997 local elections, political knowledge, trust in government, images of British leadership, and views on British political parties, the European Union, Northern Ireland, nuclear weapons, unemployment, inflation, nationalization and privatization of companies, redistribution of income, women's rights, the role of government in social policy, abortion, ethnic minorities, the British economy, and the future of governmental institutions such as the House of Lords. Background information on respondents includes age, sex, race, ethnicity, political party, political orientation, marital status, number of members in household, social class, employment history, health insurance status, citizenship, country of birth, voter registration and participation history, household income, education, religion, parents' employment history, parents' voting behavior, spouse's employment history, and union membership ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02615
Understanding political change : the British voter, 1964-1987 by Anthony Francis Heath( )

2 editions published between 1990 and 2013 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The central concern of Understanding Political Change is to explore the social and political sources of electoral change in Britain. From the Labour successes of the 1960s through the reemergence of the Liberals as a national force in 1974 and the rise and fall of the SDP to the potential emergence of the Green Party in the 1990s, Dr Heath and his collaborators chart the continually changing mould of British politics. Questions of the greater volatility of a more sophisticated electorate, of new cleavages in society replacing those based on social class, of the Conservative government's
British General Election Cross-Section Survey, 1992 by A Heath( )

2 editions published in 1996 in No Linguistic content and English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Respondents were interviewed for this cross-section survey following the 1992 British General Election. Part 1, Main Data File, covers the political and social attitudes and life experiences of the respondents, including their political interests and party preferences, opinions on comparisons between various parties, employment and union affiliations, and life satisfaction. Numerous questions are replications from previous British Election Studies and British Social Attitudes Surveys. The "international" scales in the cross-section personal interview questionnaire were taken from previous American National Election Studies. In addition, a split-sample experiment was conducted to detect whether there was a question-order effect, with respect to whether respondents were asked first about their vote and then about their party identification or vice versa. Demographic data such as sex, age, region, and religious preference appear in this file as well. Part 2, Sample Demographic File, includes information on sex, age, and region of residence for all 5,232 persons in the original sample ... Cf.: http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06453
British election study, 1983 by A. F Heath( )

5 editions published between 1983 and 1985 in 3 languages and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This joint project between investigators at Oxford University and at Social and Community Planning Research was designed to yield a representative sample of eligible voters in Great Britain at the time of the 1983 general election. As with previous surveys in the series, electors in Northern Ireland and the Scottish Highlands and Islands were excluded from the sampling frame. Fieldwork was conducted between July and October and 93 percent of the respondents were interviewed within 12 weeks of the election. Respondents were asked if they cared about the election outcome and what newspaper they read for campaign information. They were also asked to rate the degree of difference between political parties and to give their voting preferences and party affiliations. Respondents provided their opinions on nuclear weaponry, conflict in Northern Ireland, unemployment, inflation, education, and trade unions. Demographic information collected on respondents includes age, sex, marital status, employment history, and self-assigned social class. The respondents also provided information on their parents' social classes and employment histories
British Social Attitudes 25 by Alison Park( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chapter One. Chapter Seven. 'The Rolls Royce of opinion surveys' - The Times. ' an important barometer of opinion ' - The Telegraph. ' invaluable surveys of the national mood ' - Guardian. ' examines who we think we are, what we think, and how self-perceptions have changed over the past 25 years' - Financial Times. ' shows what the British people really think, as opposed to what journalists and politicians like to pretend they think' - John Pilger. The annual British Social Attitudes survey is carried out by Britain's largest independent social research organisation, the National Centre for So
Attitudes to discrimination in Scotland : 2006 : Scottish social attitudes survey by Catherine Bromley( Book )

6 editions published between 2003 and 2007 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report explores attitudes to discrimination in Scotland in relation to all six of the grounds for which anti-discrimination legislation exists in Great Britain: age, disability, gender, race, religion or belief, and sexual orientation. This research is based on a module of the Scottish Social Attitudes Survey 2006
 
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Audience level: 0.24 (from 0.04 for Revolution ... to 0.78 for Attitudes ...)

The rise of New Labour : party policies and voter choices
Covers
Revolution or evolution? : the 2007 Scottish electionsNew Scotland, new society? : are social and political ties fragmenting?Has devolution worked? : the verdict from policy makers and the publicOn message : communicating the campaignAttitudes to discrimination in Scotland : 2006 : Scottish social attitudes survey
Alternative Names
Curtice, J. K.

Curtice, John

Languages
English (109)