WorldCat Identities

Johnson-Freese, Joan

Overview
Works: 26 works in 61 publications in 2 languages and 1,681 library holdings
Classifications: TL789.8.U5, 629.410973
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Joan Johnson-Freese Publications about Joan Johnson-Freese
Publications by  Joan Johnson-Freese Publications by Joan Johnson-Freese
Most widely held works by Joan Johnson-Freese
Heavenly ambitions : America's quest to dominate space by Joan Johnson-Freese ( Book )
8 editions published between 2009 and 2014 in English and held by 383 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Space as a strategic asset by Joan Johnson-Freese ( Book )
6 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 317 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Joan Johnson-Freese argues that the race for space weapons and the U.S. quest for exclusive or at least dominant ownership of strategic space assets have alienated the very allies that the United States needs in order to maintain its leading role in space exploration. Taking a balanced look at the issues that have contributed to the decline of America's manned space program, such as the lack of political support and funding, Johnson-Freese offers not only a critique but also a plan for enhancing U.S. space security through cooperation rather than competition." "Space as a Strategic Asset underscores the danger of allowing our space program to languish and the importance of cooperation in protecting the security of our country and the world."--Jacket
Space, the dormant frontier : changing the paradigm for the 21st century by Joan Johnson-Freese ( Book )
5 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 218 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The viability of U.S. anti-satellite (ASAT) policy moving toward space control by Joan Johnson-Freese ( )
4 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 217 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This is the 30th volume in the Occasional Paper series of the U.S. Air Force Institute for National Security Studies (INSS). It is particularly timely that with the increased emphasis on space within the U.S. Air Force, in light of the ongoing HQ USAF efforts toward air and space integration into a true aerospace force, and in the wake of the 1998 INSS conference "Spacepower for a New Millennium," this work represents the initiation of the Space Policy Series of INSS Occasional Papers. In this paper, Dr Joan Johnson-Freese presents an examination of past U.S. policy and international treaty interpretations on anti-satellite weapons (ASAT) in space within the context of the organizational politics surrounding questions of developing and deploying these systems. With the ever-increasing American commercial and military reliance on space, these questions are particularly timely, and it is our hope that the debate on ASATs -- indeed on the larger issues of weaponization of space -- can be better informed by this paper
Changing patterns of international cooperation in space by Joan Johnson-Freese ( Book )
4 editions published between 1988 and 1990 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Legal research handbook : a guide for students and laymen by Robert L Bledsoe ( Book )
3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 126 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Educating America's military by Joan Johnson-Freese ( Book )
8 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in English and held by 115 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This book offers a detailed examination of the professional military education (PME) system in the United States, from a critical insider's perspective. The mission of America's war colleges is to educate senior military officers in both ways of war and defense of peace. But are these colleges doing the best job possible in carrying out that mission? Military education faces many demands, including a lack of preparation by students, uneven quality of faculty, and confusion over the curriculum. Many officers attend resident programs at the war colleges against the career advice of their leadership, despite the fact that they are virtually guaranteed graduation after less than a year of study, while others do their best to avoid it entirely. As the professional military education system has come under increasing scrutiny and criticism, some have even called for closing the war colleges. That answer, however, does not serve the United States well, especially in a complex, globalized environment, where military leaders need the best specialized education to prepare them for their future challenges. This volume examines the system, how it is perpetuated, and why it is imperative that it is fixed
The Chinese space program : a mystery within a maze by Joan Johnson-Freese ( Book )
4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Beskrivelse af Kina's situation og ambitioner inden for rumfart
Over the Pacific : Japanese space policy into the twenty-first century by Joan Johnson-Freese ( Book )
2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The American legal system and constitutional law by Joan Johnson-Freese ( Book )
1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The political implications of U.S. nuclear export policy development by Joan Johnson-Freese ( Book )
1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The prestige trap : a comparative study of the United States, European, and Japanese space programs by Roger Handberg ( Book )
1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
National policy versus EC policy: the case of nuclear power by Joan Johnson-Freese ( )
1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Kong jian zhan zheng by Joan Johnson-Freese ( Book )
1 edition published in 2008 in Chinese and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Transitioning to a Space & Air Force: Moving Beyond Rhetoric? ( )
1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Efforts within the Air Force to integrate its two primary components, air and space, have yielded at best slow and dubious results. Many space advocates and analysts assumed that the vital role space played in the Gulf War would result in space being recognized as warranting an equal position with the air component of the Air Force, if not the creation of a separate service. Although rhetoric has seemed to support those assumptions, actual progress has remained slow. In this paper, the role played by organizational culture and an indicator of organizational commitment, is also considered. The trials of teaching and integrating space into an already existing structure at the senior Air Force Professional Military Education (PME) institution, the Air War College, is examined as illustrative. The conclusion reached is that the current environment is not conducive to integration, and that rhetoric will likely continue to outpace substantive progress, with potentially negative result
Space Wei QI: The Launch of Shenzhou V ( )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Wei Qi is the favorite Chinese board game chess with more than two hundred pieces rather than sixteen, allowing for significantly increased strategic complexity. When Lieutenant Colonel Yang Liwei lifted off into space from China's Jiuquan launch site just after 9 am on 15 October 2003, returning twenty-one hours later after sixteen orbits around the earth China made a significant geostrategic Wei Qi move. China views long-term geostrategic politics as having about the same number of possible permutations as a Wei Qi board, and it is posturing accordingly. The Shenztioti V launch was part of that posturing. Perched atop a Long March (CZ-2F) launcher, the Shenztioti V spacecraft took China's first taikonaut on a trip thoroughly rehearsed during four unmanned precursor missions. Within China, a publicity campaign was carefully crafted to bring interest and national pride to a peak at the time of the event. Worldwide, media attention was considerable. Prelaunch speculation about the implications of the Chinese manned space program ranged from dubbing it a stunt to speculation about a new space race, to angst over its potential military significance
An Allard Commission Postmortem and the Need for a National Space Council ( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Organizationally, however, requirements for space capabilities are not somewhere in the military, but they are everywhere as a function of space hardware providing force enhancement potential. They are also expensive, potentially drawing otherwise available funding away from other more traditional Service capabilities, such as tanks, ships, and planes, and from traditional command, control, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities. Subsequently, while all the Services want input into decisions regarding how and where funding is spent, and full access to its use, there is less enthusiasm for bill-paying. That, added to entrenched bureaucratic acquisition practices and normal organizational politics, has resulted in decades of attempts at various arrangements to add more coherence to military space planning and organizational integration, toward optimizing funds and meeting ever-increasing needs and demands. But, as reflected over a decade ago, "organizational reform can represent a major attempt to introduce change or a mechanism for deflecting real change." Most efforts to date have served as the latter. In 2008, the Allard Commission--a panel named for sponsor Senator Wayne Allard (R?CO) and chaired by retired aerospace executive Tom Young--issued a report entitled Leadership, Organization and Management for National Security Space. It found organizational military space integration fundamentally lacking, and offered a roadmap for change. However, more than 2 years after the Allard Commission Report was issued, military space integration is still limited by organizational gridlock and resistance, with few indications of positive change on the horizon. The answer for how to change that dim future outlook remains within the Allard Report
China's manned space program : Sun Tzu or Apollo redux? by Joan Johnson-Freese ( Book )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Searching for Policy Coherence: The DOD Space Architect as an Experiment ( )
1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
In an era of declining resources, the search for ways to control and reallocate expenditures has become more focused. Pentagon responses to cost cutting have varied depending on the matter at hand. With regard to military space the answer has involved forming specialized organizations, a time-honored means of dealing with change. Organizational reform can represent a major attempt to introduce change or a mechanism for deflecting real change. This article examines the potential of the recently established Office of the DOD Space Architect
Globalizing Space Security ( )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The Nation is losing the information war against global terrorism. Many audiences abroad regard the United States as the aggressor despite the unprovoked attacks visited on New York and Washington in September 2001. Moreover, most of the Islamic world is growing increasingly hostile to Washington and its agenda. Even traditional allies and friends have responded negatively to the perceived American intent of going it alone. One key factor is the widening gap between U.S. and foreign military capabilities, which is largely attributable to superior and more integrated use of global information, in particular space-derived information. The United States has shown little inclination to work with allies to integrate the military uses of space in multilateral planning and operations. The well-financed European effort to build an independent space-based global navigation system (Galileo) is a clear reaction to U.S. intentions regarding the global positioning system (GPS). Space and information can be forces of integration rather than the causes of fragmentation in global security. They can present security opportunities. Internationally, this debate is especially important given the U.S. commitment to missile defense and military space programs and resulting perceptions abroad and the Pentagon is working to acquire sword and shield capabilities in space
 
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Alternative Names
Freese, Joan Johnson-
Freese, Joan Johnson- 1952-
Johnson-Freese, Joan Susan 1952-
Languages
English (54)
Chinese (1)
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