WorldCat Identities

Schapiro, Morton Owen

Overview
Works: 53 works in 162 publications in 2 languages and 4,311 library holdings
Genres: History  Forecasts  Academic theses  Vital statistics  Abstracts 
Roles: Editor, Author, Other
Classifications: LB2337.4, 379.12140973
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Morton Owen Schapiro
The fabulous future? : America and the world in 2040 by Gary Saul Morson( )

10 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 817 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Will the future be one of economic expansion, greater tolerance, liberating inventions, and longer, happier lives? Or do we face economic stagnation, declining quality of life, and a techno-logically enhanced totalitarianism worse than any yet seen? "The Fabulous Future? America and the World in 2040 "draws its inspi-ration from a more optimistic time, and tome, "The Fabulous Fu-ture: America in 1980," in which "Fortune "magazine celebrated its twenty-fifth anniversary by publishing the predictions of thought leaders of its time. In the present volume, the world's leading specialists from di-verse fields project developments in their areas of expertise, from religion and the media to the environment and nanotechnology. Will we be happier, and what exactly does happiness have to do with our economic future? Where is higher education heading and how should it develop? And what is the future of prediction itself? These exciting essays provoke sharper questions, reflect unexpectedly on one another, and testify to our present anxieties about the surprising world to come."--Publisher description
Cents and sensibility : what economics can learn from the humanities by Gary Saul Morson( Book )

21 editions published between 2017 and 2019 in English and held by 766 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Economists often act as if their methods explain all human behavior. But in Cents and Sensibility, an eminent literary critic and a leading economist make the case that the humanities, especially the study of literature, offer economists ways to make their models more realistic, their predictions more accurate, and their policies more effective and just. Gary Saul Morson and Morton Schapiro trace the connection between Adam Smith's great classic, The Wealth of Nations, and his less celebrated book on The Theory of Moral Sentiments, and contend that a few decades later Jane Austen invented her groundbreaking method of novelistic narration in order to give life to the empathy that Smith believed essential to humanity. Morson and Schapiro argue that Smith's heirs include Austen, Anton Chekhov, and Leo Tolstoy as well as John Maynard Keynes and Milton Friedman. Economists need a richer appreciation of behavior, ethics, culture, and narrative--all of which the great writers teach better than anyone. Cents and Sensibility demonstrates the benefits of a freewheeling dialogue between economics and the humanities by addressing a wide range of problems drawn from the economics of higher education, the economics of the family, and the development of poor nations. It offers new insights about everything from the manipulation of college rankings to why some countries grow faster than others. At the same time, the book shows how looking at real-world problems can revitalize the study of literature itself
Keeping college affordable : government and educational opportunity by Michael S McPherson( Book )

9 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 580 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book evaluates the role of federal and state legislatures in subsidizing higher education and keeping college affordable for Americans of all economic and social backgrounds. It provides evidence to examine whether America's financial resources are being used as effectively as possible in higher education investments. Further, it examines the impact of student aid policies of the last 20 years on such factors as enrollment, institutional effectiveness, and educational opportunity. It is questioned whether federal student aid has encouraged enrollment and broadened education choices of disadvantaged students; whether institutions are now more secure and educationally more effective; and whether the distribution of higher education's benefits, and sharing of its cost, is fairer. In addition, a projection of the likely trends of college affordability is provided. Chapters examine the changing patterns of college finance and enrollment; student financial aid; the supply-side effects of student aid; the effects of incomes, prices, and college choice; the better targeting of student aid; and the development of better public policies for higher-education finance. Among the appendices are a report concerning college costs, financial aid, and enrollment; and an analysis of government support and institutional behavior. Contains 112 references and an index. (Glr)
The student aid game : meeting need and rewarding talent in American higher education by Michael S McPherson( Book )

13 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 556 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In The Student Aid Game, Michael S. McPherson and Morton Owen Shapiro explain how both colleges and governments are struggling to cope with a rapidly changing marketplace, and show how sound policies can help preserve the strengths and remedy some emerging weaknesses of American higher education. Of particular interest is the issue of merit aid. McPherson and Schapiro consider the attractions and pitfalls of merit aid from the viewpoint of students, institutions, and society
Paying the piper : productivity, incentives, and financing in U.S. higher education by Michael S McPherson( Book )

11 editions published between 1993 and 1997 in English and Italian and held by 375 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The essays comprising this volume demonstrate that the application of basic economic principles and a combination of both descriptive and econometric analyses can illuminate a number of issues. Using economic concepts and tools to provide insight into these pressing questions, PAYING THE PIPER helps us to understand the recent past, anticipate the future, and develop policies that can influence the future
College access : opportunity or privilege?( Book )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 233 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Filling up America : an economic-demographic model of population growth and distribution in the nineteenth-century United States by Morton Owen Schapiro( Book )

9 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 228 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

College success : what it means and how to make it happen( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 224 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A collection of twelve essays that addresses college success, discussing expectations, financial burdens, requirements, effective instruction, and other related topics
Selective admission and the public interest by Michael S McPherson( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 92 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reinforcing stratification in American higher education : some disturbing trends by Michael S McPherson( Book )

3 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 89 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report examines the decade of change in the U.S. system of finance for higher education, which has resulted in a set of programs and policies that are highly responsive to the demands of middle- and upper-income families for help but which are less well equipped to respond to the needs of lower-income families for assistance with their college investments. This paper documents this trend and examines the relationship between financing trends and trends in the enrollment patterns of U.S. high school students (E.G., college access and college choice). The paper also comments on the political economy of the developments being documented (E.G., forces that appear to be leading public policy in the directions identified and circumstances that might produce a different, and perhaps more favorable, outlook for financing policy). The paper concludes that, in most circumstances, when colleges and universities get more revenue, the result is that they do more social good. It claims that the intrinsic benefits of college to students are of at least as much importance as the gain in relative position that accrues from college education. (Contains 14 references.) (Sm)
Merit aid : students, institutions, and society by Michael S McPherson( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 87 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Recent research indicates a trend toward increases in the share of all institution-based student aid funds going to merit aid and in merit scholarship competition among institutions. This paper presents findings of a study that surveyed 379 nonprofit bachelors'-degree-granting institutions in 1983-84 and 1991-92. Findings indicate that the less selective institutions in both the public and private sectors are far more involved in merit aid than their more prestigious counterparts. However, the revenue foregone by institutions that did engage heavily in merit competition clearly absorbed resources that could otherwise go into the educational enterprise. The costs of merit competition are clearly on the rise. A second finding is that students are rewarded for the difference between their personal sat scores and the school's average sat scores. In summary, merit aid compensates students for attending schools that are "beneath" them, especially in the private sector. Although white students (excluding athletes) get a proportionate share of total merit aid, they are overrepresented in the merit pool in private institutions and underrepresented at public schools. Black and Hispanic students, however, collect a disproportionate share of merit aid at public schools while losing out in the private sector. Finally, the evidence that merit aid rewards higher academic qualifications while, especially in the private sector, providing smaller awards to students from more affluent backgrounds is encouraging from both an equity and an efficiency perspective. Five tables are included. Contains seven references. (Lmi)
Students choosing colleges : understanding the matriculation eecision at a highly selective private institution by Peter J Nürnberg( )

8 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 66 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The college choice process can be reduced to three questions: 1) Where does a student apply? 2) Which schools accept the students? 3) Which offer of admission does the student accept? This paper addresses question three. Specifically, we offer an econometric analysis of the matriculation decisions made by students accepted to Williams College, one of the nation's most highly selective colleges and universities. We use data for the Williams classes of 2008 through 2012 to estimate a yield model. We find that--conditional on the student applying to and being accepted by Williams--applicant quality as measured by standardized tests, high school GPA and the like, the net price a particular student faces (the sticker price minus institutional financial aid), the applicant's race and geographic origin, plus the student's artistic, athletic and academic interests, are strong predictors of whether or not the student will matriculate
Educational goodwill : measuring the intangible assets at highly selective private colleges and universities by Peter J Nürnberg( )

6 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this paper we utilize data on the head-to-head loss rate for students accepted at Williams College, but who opt to enroll elsewhere. For example, we employ data that measure the fraction of students admitted to Williams and to Amherst (or Harvard or Yale, etc.) but who opt to attend Amherst (or Harvard or Yale, etc.) instead of Williams. We then model this head-to-head loss rate using data from a variety of sources. A better understanding of the head-to-head loss rate can assist an institution in the competition for high quality students. Importantly, it can also shed light on the degree to which some part of the loss rate might be due to "intangible" differences between the schools being compared. These intangibles (positive or negative) might grant a school greater success (or failure) in the market for students than an objective accounting of its characteristics might suggest. Such an advantage (or disadvantage) is closely aligned with the business concept of "goodwill." We present preliminary evidence on how a quantitative measure of educational goodwill can be computed
Are tenure track professors better teachers? by David N Figlio( )

5 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 57 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study makes use of detailed student-level data from eight cohorts of first-year students at Northwestern University to investigate the relative effects of tenure track/tenured versus non-tenure line faculty on student learning. We focus on classes taken during a student's first term at Northwestern, and employ a unique identification strategy in which we control for both student-level fixed effects and next-class-taken fixed effects to measure the degree to which non-tenure line faculty contribute more or less to lasting student learning than do other faculty. We find consistent evidence that students learn relatively more from non-tenure line professors in their introductory courses. These differences are present across a wide variety of subject areas, and are particularly pronounced for Northwestern's average students and less-qualified students
An economic model of fertility, migration, and settlement in the rural northern United States, 1790-1900 by Morton Owen Schapiro( )

5 editions published between 1979 and 1981 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Are Tenure Track Professors Better Teachers? Nber Working Paper No. 19406 by David N Figlio( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study makes use of detailed student-level data from eight cohorts of first-year students at Northwestern University to investigate the relative effects of tenure track/tenured versus non-tenure line faculty on student learning. We focus on classes taken during a student & apos;s first term at Northwestern, and employ a unique identification strategy in which we control for both student-level fixed effects and next-class-taken fixed effects to measure the degree to which non-tenure line faculty contribute more or less to lasting student learning than do other faculty. We find consistent evidence that students learn relatively more from non-tenure line professors in their introductory courses. These differences are present across a wide variety of subject areas, and are particularly pronounced for Northwestern & apos;s average students and less-qualified students
Recent trends in U.S. higher education costs and prices : the role of government funding by Michael S McPherson( Book )

3 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Economic development and population growth : implications from a model of U.S. demographic history by Morton Owen Schapiro( Book )

3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Socioeconomic ramifications of changing cohort size : an analysis and forecast of U.S. postwar suicide rates by age and sex by Dennis A Ahlburg( Book )

3 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Internal migration in the United States : evidence from the early 19th century by Morton Owen Schapiro( Book )

3 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.42 (from 0.37 for Cents and ... to 0.79 for Economic d ...)

Keeping college affordable : government and educational opportunity
Covers
The student aid game : meeting need and rewarding talent in American higher educationCollege access : opportunity or privilege?College success : what it means and how to make it happen
Alternative Names
Morton O. Schapiro economista estadounidense

Owen Schapiro, Morton

Owen Schapiro, Morton 1953-

Schapiro, Morton.

Schapiro Morton 1953-....

Schapiro, Morton O.

Schapiro, Morton O. 1953-

Schapiro, Morton Owen

Languages
English (121)

Italian (1)