WorldCat Identities

Statistics Canada Analytical Studies Branch

Overview
Works: 2,141 works in 3,538 publications in 2 languages and 35,108 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals 
Roles: Other
Classifications: GF511, 363.70971021
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Statistics Canada
Intergenerational education mobility among the children of Canadian immigrants by Abdurrahman Aydemir( )

5 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 126 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We analyse the intergenerational education mobility of Canadian men and women born to immigrants. A detailed portrait of Canadians is offered, as are estimates of the degree of intergenerational mobility among the children of immigrants. Persistence in the years of schooling across the generations is rather weak between immigrants and their Canadian-born children, and one third as strong as for the general population. Parental earnings are not correlated with years of schooling for second-generation children and, if anything, are negatively correlated. Finally, we find that the intergenerational transmission of education has not changed across the birth cohorts of the post-war period
Incentive effects of social assistance : a regression discontinuity approach by Thomas Lemieux( )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 121 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Before 1989, childless social assistance recipients in Quebec under age 30 received much lower benefits than recipients over age 30."
The post-childbirth employment of Canadian mothers and the earnings trajectories of their continuously employed counterparts, 1983 to 2004 by Xuelin Zhang( )

5 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 118 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using the 1983 to 2004 Longitudinal Worker File, this study examines the post-childbirth employment, job mobility and earnings trajectories of Canadian mothers. We found that both the long- and the short-term post-childbirth employment rates of early 2000s cohorts of Canadian mothers were higher than their mid-1980s counterparts, and, relative to childless women, Canadian mothers became less likely to quit over time. Our data also allow us to examine the earnings impact of childbirth for a group of Canadian mothers who had strong labour market attachment. For them, earnings dropped by 40% and 30% in the year of childbirth and the year after, respectively. Under both the fixed-effects and the fixed-trend models, the earnings impact of childbirth declined over the other post-childbirth years. Results from the fixed-trend model further suggest that, from the second to the seventh post-childbirth years, the negative effects varied between 8% and 3% and became negligible thereafter
Immigrant characteristics, the IT bust, and their effect on entry earnings of immigrants by W. G Picot( )

4 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 115 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using administrative data, this paper asks (1) whether the changing characteristics of immigrants, notably the rise in the share with university education and in the "skilled economic" immigrant class, contributed positively to immigrant entry earnings during the 1990s, and (2) whether the entry earnings of immigrants improved after 2000, and if not, why not. We find that, through the 1990s, the rising number of entering immigrants with university degrees and in the skilled economic class did little to improve earnings at the bottom of the earnings distribution (and reduce poverty rates among entering immigrants), but the changes did increase earnings among immigrants at the middle and top of the earnings distribution. The increasing numbers of highly educated at the bottom of the earnings distribution were unable to convert their education and "skilled class" designation to higher earnings: they found themselves with low incomes. These outcomes may be related to language, credentialism, education quality, or supply issues, as discussed in the paper. We find that from 2000 to 2004, the entry earnings of immigrants renewed their slide, but for reasons that differed from the standard explanations of the earlier decline. Much of the fall after 2000 was concentrated among immigrants intending to practice in the information technology (IT) or engineering occupations. This coincided with the IT downturn, which appears to have significantly affected outcomes for these immigrants, particularly the men. Following the significant increase in supply in response to the call for more high-tech workers in the late 1990s, the large numbers of entering immigrants were faced with the IT downturn
Why are most university students women? : evidence based on academic performance, study habits and parental influences by Marc Frenette( )

4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 112 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this study, we use new Canadian data containing detailed information on standardized test scores, school marks, parental and peer influences, and other socio-economic background characteristics of boys and girls to try to account for the large gender gap in university attendance. Among 19-year-old youth in 2003, 38.8% of girls had attended university, compared with only 25.7% of boys. However, young men and women were about equally likely to attend college. We find that differences in observable characteristics between boys and girls account for more than three quarters (76.8%) of the gap in university participation. In order of importance, the main factors are differences in school marks at age 15, standardized test scores in reading at age 15, study habits, parental expectations and the university earnings premium relative to high school. Altogether, the four measures of academic abilities used in the study "overall marks, performance on standardized reading tests, study habits and repeating grade" collectively account for 58.9% of the gender gap in university participation. These results suggest that understanding why girls outperform boys in the classroom may be a key to understanding the gender divide in university participation
Human activity and the environment( )

in English and held by 112 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Internal migration of immigrants : do immigrants respond to regional labour demand shocks? by Yuri Ostrovsky( )

3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 111 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The recent economic boom in the Canadian province of Alberta provides an ideal "natural experiment" to examine immigrants' responses to a strong labour demand outside major metropolitan centres. The key finding of our study, which is based on a unique dataset that combines administrative and immigrant records, is that not only did immigrants respond to the recent economic boom in Alberta, but they responded generally more strongly than non-immigrants. We find, however, a great deal of heterogeneity in the magnitude of the response across different regions and for different categories of immigrants
How do families and unattached individuals respond to layoffs? : evidence from Canada by R Morissette( )

3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 110 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using data from a large Canadian longitudinal dataset, we examine whether earnings of wives and teenagers increase in response to layoffs experienced by husbands. We find virtually no evidence of an "added worker effect" for the earnings of teenagers. However, we find that among families with no children of working age, wives' earnings offset about one fifth of the earnings losses experienced by husbands five years after the layoff. We also contrast the long-term earnings losses experienced by husbands and unattached males. Even though the former group might be less mobile geographically than the latter, we find that both groups experience roughly the same earnings losses in the long run. Furthermore, the income losses (before tax and after tax) of both groups are also very similar. However, because unattached males have much lower pre-layoff income, they experience much greater relative income shocks than (families of) laid-off husbands
Participation in adult schooling and its earnings impact in Canada by Xuelin Zhang( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 109 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In Canada and other industrialized countries, many adult workers return to school to obtain additional education."
Income instability of lone parents, singles and two-parent families in Canada, 1984 to 2004 by R Morissette( )

3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines income instability of lone parents, singles and two-parent families in Canada in the past two decades using tax data. We attempt to answer the following questions: Has there been a widespread increase in earnings instability among lone parents (especially lone mothers) and unattached individuals over the past 20 years? How do the trends in earnings instability among lone parents and unattached individuals compare to the trends among the two-parent families? What is the role of government transfers and the progressive tax system in mitigating differences in earnings instability across different segments of the earnings distribution among the above-mentioned groups? We find little evidence of a widespread increase in earnings instability in the past two decades and show that government transfers play a particularly important role in reducing employment income instability of lone mothers and unattached individuals
Workers laid-off during the last three recessions : who were they, and how did they fare by Ping Ching Winnie Chan( )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 105 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Over the last three decades, Canada has experienced three recessions: one that started during the early 1980s; a second that began during the early 1990s; and the most recent one, which led to employment declines starting in October 2008. For each recession, this study: a) examines which workers were laid-off; b) quantifies layoff rates; and c) assesses the proportion of workers that found a job shortly after being laid-off. The layoff concept used includes temporary layoffs as well as permanent layoffs
Gender differences in quits and absenteeism in Canada by Xuelin Zhang( )

5 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 104 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Female workers are traditionally viewed as more likely to quit, to be absent and to take more days of absence than male workers, and this gender difference is widely used as an important explanation for the gender wage gap and other labour market differences between men and women. This study documents the gender differences in quits and absenteeism in Canada and attempts to assess whether the traditional view is still valid today. The study found that Canadian women's quitting behaviour changed dramatically over the past two decades. While women's permanent quit rate was greater than that of men in the 1980s, it converged with men's permanent quit rate since the early 1990s, and today there does not seem to be any significant difference in quitting behaviour between Canadian men and women. In terms of absenteeism, it was found that, other things being equal, Canadian men and women were somewhat different in paid sick leave, not in other paid and unpaid leaves, and their difference in paid sick leave was not large: women took only one day more than men. Taken together, these results imply that, in Canada, the current gender differences in quits and absenteeism are not significant factors to explain certain gender differences in labour market outcomes, such as the wage gap between men and women
Income inequality and redistribution in Canada, 1976 to 2004 by Andrew Heisz( )

3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 104 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using data from the 1976 to 1997 Survey of Consumer Finances and the 1993 to 2004 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, we examine developments in family income inequality, income polarization, relative low income, and income redistribution through the tax-transfer system. We conclude that family after-tax-income inequality was stable across the 1980s, but rose during the 1989 to 2004 period. Growth in family after-tax-income inequality can be due to an increase in family market-income inequality (pre-tax, pre-transfer), or to a reduction in income redistribution through the tax-transfer system. We conclude that the increase in inequality was associated with a rise in family market-income inequality. Redistribution was at least as high in 2004 as it was at earlier cyclical peaks, but it failed to keep up with rapid growth in family market-income inequality in the 1990s. We present income inequality, polarization, and low-income statistics for several well-known measures, and use data preparations identical to those used in the Luxembourg Income Study in order to facilitate international comparisons
Why did employment and earnings rise among lone mothers during the 1980s and 1990s? by John Myles( )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 104 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Employment rates and earnings among single mothers improved significantly after 1980, and by 2000, low-income rates reached new historic lows. Unlike married mothers, most of the gains among lone mothers were the result of the dynamics of population change and cohort replacement as the large and better educated baby boom generation replaced earlier cohorts and began entering their forties. Most of these gains, moreover, went to older lone mothers. The demographically driven gains of lone mothers in the past quarter century were an historical event unlikely to be repeated in the future. Since the demographic drivers underlying these gains are now nearing maturity, future gains from this source are likely to be modest
Income replacement rates among Canadian seniors : the effect of widowhood and divorce by Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté( )

3 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using a longitudinal database and fixed-effects econometric models, this paper assesses the effect of widowhood or widowerhood, and divorce after age 55 on income replacement rates during the retirement years. Among women, separation or divorce has a larger negative effect than does widowhood. The effect of divorce or separation is greatest among women from higher-income families, where there is more reliance on private-pension and investment income. Reliance on public-pension income reduces the effect of divorce on replacement rates for lower-income women. Among men, separation or divorce has little effect on replacement rates. Widowerhood increases replacement rates among middle- and higher-income men
Choice or necessity : do immigrants and their children choose self-employment for the same reasons? by Teresa Abada( )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 102 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Immigrants in major industrialized countries are disproportionately represented in self-employment as compared to the domestic-born. Using a generational cohort method and data from the 20% sample file of the 1981 Canadian Census and the 20% sample file of the 2006 Canadian Census, this study examines whether the effects of three important determinants of self-employment -- expected earnings differentials between paid employment and self-employment, difficulties in the labour market, and ethnic enclaves -- differ between immigrants and the Canadian-born, between children of immigrants and children of the Canadian-born, and between children of immigrants and their parents
Bosses of their own : are children of immigrants more likely than their parents to be self-employed? by Feng Hou( )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 102 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Self-employment has been regarded as an important pathway for many immigrants to engage in the labour market. However, little is known about self-employment among the children of immigrants. Using the 1981 and 2006 Canadian censuses of population and a generational cohort method of analysis, this paper compares the self-employment rates of immigrant parents and the children of immigrant parents when both were 25 to 44 years of age. The focus is on three questions: (1) Are children of immigrants likelier or less likely than immigrant parents to be self-employed?; (2) Are children of immigrants likelier or less likely than children of Canadian-born parents to be self-employed?; (3) Is the generational change in the self-employment rate from immigrant parents to the children of immigrants different from the generational change from Canadian-born parents to their children?
Income and the outcomes of children by Shelley A Phipps( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 100 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This report re-investigates the connection between income and child well-being for a broad range of outcomes."
Immigrant status, early skill development, and postsecondary participation : a comparison of Canada and Switzerland by W. G Picot( )

2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 100 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines differences in postsecondary-participation rates between students with and without immigrant backgrounds in Switzerland and Canada. For both countries, a rich set of longitudinal data, including family background, family aspirations regarding postsecondary education, and students' secondary-school performance as measured by Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) scores, are used to explain these differences. Two groups are analyzed: all 15-year-old students; and all low-performing 15-year-old secondary-school students. The results suggest that the gap in postsecondary participation between students with and without immigrant backgrounds, and its determinants, differs significantly between the two countries. This gap also differs significantly by students' source region background. In Canada, students with immigrant backgrounds who are low performers in secondary school have surprisingly high rates of postsecondary participation, particularly if they have an Asian background. In Switzerland, postsecondary participation among low performers in secondary school is much lower, whether they have an immigrant background or not. Possible reasons for these inter-country differences are discussed, including differences in the immigration and education systems as well as differences in the distribution of immigrants by source region
Reversal of fortunes or continued success? : cohort differences in education and earnings of childhood immigrants by Aneta Bonikowska( )

2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 100 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Current knowledge about the favourable socioeconomic attainment (in education and earnings) among children of immigrants is based on the experiences of those individuals whose immigrant parents came to Canada before the 1970s. Since then, successive cohorts of adult immigrants have experienced deteriorating entry earnings. This has raised questions about whether the outcomes of their children have changed over time. This study shows that successive cohorts of childhood immigrants who arrived in Canada at age 12 or younger during the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s had increasingly higher educational attainment (as measured by the share with university degrees) than their Canadian-born peers by age 25 to 34. Conditional on education and other background characteristics, male childhood immigrants who arrived in the 1960s earned less than the Canadian-born comparison group, but the two subsequent cohorts had similar earnings as the comparison group. Female childhood immigrants earned as much as the Canadian-born comparison group, except for the 1980s cohort, which earned more
 
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Alternative Names
Analytical Studies Branch Canada

Analytical Studies Canada

Canada Analytical Studies

Canada Analytical Studies Branch

Statistics Canada Analytical Studies

Statistics Canada. Analytical Studies Branch

Statistics Canada Analytical Studies Division

Statistics Canada Direction des études analytiques

Statistique Canada Études analytiques

Languages
English (71)

French (1)