WorldCat Identities

Cox, Gary W.

Overview
Works: 35 works in 163 publications in 3 languages and 7,797 library holdings
Genres: Rules  History  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Editor, Contributor
Classifications: JK1429, 328.7307345
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Gary W Cox
Legislative leviathan : party government in the House by Gary W Cox( Book )

24 editions published between 1993 and 2007 in English and held by 762 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The second edition of Legislative Leviathan provides an incisive new look at the inner workings of the House of Representatives in the post-World War II era. Re-evaluating the role of parties and committees, Gary W. Cox and Mathew D. McCubbins view parties in the House - especially majority parties - as a species of 'legislative cartel'. These cartels seize the power, theoretically resident in the House, to make rules governing the structure and process of legislation. Most of the cartel's efforts are focused on securing control of the legislative agenda for its members. The first edition of this book had significant influence on the study of American politics and is essential reading for students of Congress, the presidency, and the political party system
Making votes count : strategic coordination in the world's electoral systems by Gary W Cox( Book )

31 editions published between 1997 and 2007 in 3 languages and held by 626 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Popular elections are at the heart of representative democracy. Thus, understanding the laws and practices that govern such elections is essential to understanding modern democracy. In this book, Cox views electoral laws as posing a variety of coordination problems that political forces must solve. Coordination problems - and with them the necessity of negotiating withdrawals, strategic voting, and other species of strategic coordination - arise in all electoral systems. This is the first book that employs a unified game-theoretic model to study strategic coordination worldwide and that relies primarily on constituency-level rather than national aggregate data in testing theoretical propositions about the effects of electoral laws. This is also the first book that considers not just what happens when political forces succeed in solving the coordination problems inherent in the electoral system they face but also what happens when they fail. Winner of the Wilson Prize for the best book in political science published in 1997, the Luebbart Prize awarded to the best book in comparative politics, and the prize from the American Political Science association for the best book in political economy
Elbridge Gerry's salamander : the electoral consequences of the reapportionment revolution by Gary W Cox( Book )

14 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 566 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Supreme Court's reapportionment decisions, beginning with Baker v. Carr in 1962, had far more than jurisprudential consequences. They sparked a massive wave of extraordinary redistricting in the mid-1960s. Both state legislative and congressional districts were redrawn more comprehensively--by far--than at any previous time in our nation's history. Moreover, they changed what would legally happen should a state government fail to enact a new districting plan when one was legally required. This book provides the first detailed analysis of how judicial partisanship affected redistricting outcomes in the 1960s, arguing that the reapportionment revolution led indirectly to three fundamental changes in the nature of congressional elections: the abrupt eradication of a 6% pro-Republican bias in the translation of congressional votes into seats outside the south; the abrupt increase in the apparent advantage of incumbents; and the abrupt alteration of the two parties' success in congressional recruitment and elections
The Politics of divided government( Book )

9 editions published between 1991 and 1992 in English and held by 462 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this survey of current and controversial issues affecting US governance today, leading scholars examine various aspects of divided government - from institutional concerns to issues such as the budget deficit - to provide an analysis of contemporary American politics
Setting the agenda : responsible party government in the U.S. House of Representatives by Gary W Cox( Book )

12 editions published between 2005 and 2007 in English and held by 448 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Scholars of the U.S. House disagree over the importance of political parties in organizing the legislative process. On the one hand, non-partisan theories stress how congressional organization serves members' non-partisan goals. On the other hand, partisan theories argue that the House is organized to serve the collective interests of the majority party. This book advances our partisan theory and presents a series of empirical tests of that theory's predictions (pitted against others). It considers why procedural cartels form, arguing that agenda power is naturally subject to cartelization in busy legislatures. It argues that the majority party has cartelized agenda power in the U.S. House since the adoption of Reed's rules in 1890. The evidence demonstrates that the majority party seizes agenda control at nearly every stage of the legislative process in order to prevent bills that the party dislikes from reaching the floor
The efficient secret : the cabinet and the development of political parties in Victorian England by Gary W Cox( Book )

20 editions published between 1987 and 2005 in English and held by 425 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Efficient Secret is an analysis of the institutional changes in parliamentary government in nineteenth-century England, concentrating on the years between the first and third Reform Acts. Professor Gary W. Cox employs a rational choice model to analyze the problems of voter choice and to examine the emergence of party loyalty in the electorate, the development of cabinet government, and their legislative consequences. The introductory chapters provide the historical setting for this study and briefly survey nineteenth-century political and economic events. Professor Cox then focuses on the increases in party voting in Parliament and in the electorate. To support his argument concerning these parallel developments, he uses statistical evidence drawn from poll books and newspapers
Marketing sovereign promises : monopoly brokerage and the growth of the English state by Gary W Cox( Book )

7 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 76 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"How did England, once a minor regional power, become a global hegemon between 1689 and 1815? Why, over the same period, did she become the world's first industrial nation? Gary W. Cox addresses these questions in Marketing Sovereign Promises. The book examines two central issues: the origins of the great taxing power of the modern state and how that power is made compatible with economic growth. Part I considers England's rise after the revolution of 1689, highlighting the establishment of annual budgets with shutdown reversions. This core reform effected a great increase in per capita tax extraction. Part II investigates the regional and global spread of British budgeting ideas. Cox argues that states grew only if they addressed a central credibility problem afflicting the Ancien Regime - that rulers were legally entitled to spend public revenue however they deemed fit"--
Mixed-member electoral systems in constitutional context : Taiwan, Japan, and beyond by Nathan F Batto( Book )

12 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reformers have promoted mixed-member electoral systems as the "best of both worlds." In ibis volume, internationally recognized political scientists evaluate the ways in which the introduction of a mixed-member electoral system affects the configuration of political parties. The contributors examine several political phenomena, including cabinet post allocation, nominations, preelectoral coalitions, split-ticket voting, and the size of party systems and faction systems. Significantly; they also consider various ways in which the constitutional system-especially whether the head of government is elected directly or indirectly-can modify the incentives created by the electoral system. The findings presented here demonstrate that the success of electoral reform depends not only on the specification of new electoral rules per se but also on the political context-and especially the constitutional framework-within which such rules are embedded
Party strategic errors in electoral systems without vote transfers by Matthew Soberg Shugart( Book )

3 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Party and constituency in Victorian Britain by Gary W Cox( Book )

5 editions published between 1983 and 1987 in English and Undetermined and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Marketing sovereign promises : monopoly brokerage and the growth of the English state by Gary W Cox( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"How did England, once a minor regional power, become a global hegemon between 1689 and 1815? Why, over the same period, did she become the world's first industrial nation? Gary W. Cox addresses these questions in Marketing Sovereign Promises. The book examines two central issues: the origins of the great taxing power of the modern state and how that power is made compatible with economic growth. Part I considers England's rise after the revolution of 1689, highlighting the establishment of annual budgets with shutdown reversions. This core reform effected a great increase in per capita tax extraction. Part II investigates the regional and global spread of British budgeting ideas. Cox argues that states grew only if they addressed a central credibility problem afflicting the Ancien Regime - that rulers were legally entitled to spend public revenue however they deemed fit"
Why did the incumbency advantage in U.S. house elections grow by Gary W Cox( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On the effects of legislative rules by Gary W Cox( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Electoral rules and the calculus of mobilization by Gary W Cox( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Electoral equilibrium under alternative voting institutions by Gary W Cox( )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Party and constituency in Victorian Britain by Gary W Cox( )

1 edition published in 1983 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The development in the British parliament, during the latter half of the nineteenth century, of highly cohesive legislative parties is a leading thread in the complex of events marking Britain's passage from an aristocratic to a democratic politics. Since the 1870s, journalists and scholars have attempted to account for the marked increase in the frequency with which MPs voted with their parties, and a number of plausible hypothesis have been advanced. There has not, however, been a systematic exposition of the kinds of factors which might, in theory, have been responsible for the change, nor much in the way of testing those ideas which have been suggested. We argue that most of the explanations in the literature cannot explain the earliest increases in party cohesion--in the 1860s and 1870s. Sometimes, this is simply because the factors to which the explanation refers are not operative until a later date. In other cases, we devise tests of the hypotheses and find them wanting. In particular, we find no support in the 1870s for the idea, associated with Mosei Ostrogonski, that the new local party associations which developed after the second Reform Act effectively pressured MPs to support their party's leadership. Our theoretical discussion of the determinants of party cohesion leads us to investigate, as an alternative source of legislative change, the effect of electoral voting behavior (or, more properly, anticipations of such behavior) on legislative voting behavior. The bulk of the thesis is devoted to this task, and proceeds as follows: First, extensive use is made of a peculiarly detailed form of electoral documentation available in the double-member districts of pre-1885 Britain to study electoral behavior in the 1841-1880 period. This study reveals clear and marked changes in British electoral behavior in the 1860s and 1870s which have not hitherto been documented in the literature. An expected utility maximization model of the decision problem faced by ele
A note on crime and punishment by Gary W Cox( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Multicandidate spatial competition by Gary W Cox( )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The incumbency advantage in multimember districts : evidence from the U.S. states by Gary W Cox( )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Efficient Secret by Gary W Cox( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Making votes count : strategic coordination in the world's electoral systems
Alternative Names
Cox, Gary 1955-

Gary W. Cox American political scientist

Gary W. Cox Amerikaans politicoloog

Languages
English (138)

Spanish (5)

Italian (3)

Covers
Making votes count : strategic coordination in the world's electoral systemsElbridge Gerry's salamander : the electoral consequences of the reapportionment revolutionSetting the agenda : responsible party government in the U.S. House of RepresentativesThe efficient secret : the cabinet and the development of political parties in Victorian England