WorldCat Identities

Brooks, Fiona

Overview
Works: 15 works in 26 publications in 1 language and 219 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Roles: Author
Classifications: RA410.9.G7, 331.1291610941
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Fiona Brooks
Health manpower : planning, production, and management by Andrew F Long( Book )

3 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 114 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book reports on a study of the health manpower process within the NHS, explores manpower planning, production and management aims, methodologies and practices and assesses their compatibility with the WHO "Health for All by the year 2000" strategy
New beginnings : towards patient and public involvement in primary health care( Book )

3 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Primary care is the life-blood of the NHS. At the core of health care in this country are the relationships between GPs, practice nurses, therapists and their patients. What matters most for these users of health services is that they have access to professionals they can trust"--Cover
Is bigger better? : the impact of marine protected area expansion on community-based conservation by Fiona Brooks( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Key data on adolescence 2009 by John C Coleman( Book )

4 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The latest edition of this essential publication busts myths and explains what is really happening for young people and families. It covers families, education and training, physical health, sexual health, mental health, crime, and much more
Do grandparents matter? : the impact of grandparenting on the well being of children by Fiona Brooks( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Beating social exclusion : an evaluation of specialised midwifery support services in teenage pregnancy: final report by Fiona Brooks( Book )

4 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Midwives' perceptions on the state of midwifery by Fiona Brooks( Book )

2 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Midwives' perceptions on the state of midwifery : concise summary of report by Fiona Brooks( Book )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Midwives' perceptions on the state of midwifery : report by Fiona Brooks( Book )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women patients' preferences for female or male GPs by David Phillips( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Women in general practice : responding to the sexual division of labour? by Fiona Brooks( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Women's views on partnership working with midwives during pregnancy and childbirth by Sally Boyle( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

United Kingdom (UK) health policy over the past thirty years has been predicated on a partnership model focusing on empowering service users to be fully involved in their care. Within maternity care partnership relationships have been conceptualised as empowering women to have continuity, choice and control (Department of Health (DoH), 1993), within a relationship of personal autonomy between the woman and her carers. In this study I sought to identify the extent to which the Government agenda for partnership working and choice is realised or desired by women during pregnancy and childbirth. In addition, I wanted to examine the level of alignment between the views of midwives with that of women accessing the maternity services. This study took a qualitative approach, drawing on the principles of grounded theory. In the first phase of the study a purposive sample of sixteen pregnant women were recruited and invited to complete a diary and to take part in two interviews. Women maintained diary entries following appointments with the midwife during pregnancy and childbirth. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken at 36 weeks of pregnancy and four weeks after the birth, based on the diary entries. In the second phase, four focus groups were undertaken with two groups of community midwives and birth centre midwives from two National Health Service (NHS) Trusts. Quotes from the diary-interviews from phase one were utilised to develop three vignettes which acted as a prompt during the focus group interviews. Following a thematic analysis of the data, I analysed women's views on partnership working and choice. Most women in this study did not feel that they developed a partnership relationship with the midwife. This was associated with a lack of continuity of care and insufficient time to engage in meaningful discussion in an environment which was not conducive to shared decision making. Women described wide variations on the midwives role in supporting decision making. This ranged from decisions being dictated to midwives guiding choices and for some women, being facilitated to make informed choices. Many women described input of family and friends and widespread use of the internet as an information source. Women depicted their antenatal midwifery care as medicalised and felt that whilst their bio-medical needs were met their psycho-social and emotional needs were not. Women described the visits frequently as 'in and out' or 'ticking the boxes' to describe this approach to care. A small number of women (n=5) did experience a partnership relationship. Three of these women knew the midwife from a previous pregnancy; the remaining two women attended a midwifery led unit for all of their care. In relation to the choice agenda, most of the women who participated in this study were not aware that they had a choice about who provided their care or where they would have their care. The midwife focus groups concurred with the women's findings and suggested that a lack of time was a significant factor hindering the formation of a partnership relationship. Midwives felt that this was exacerbated by the paperwork they were required to complete in order to audit care and meet the 'payment by results' agenda (DoH, 2003b). During the focus groups midwives identified strategies which could be implemented to enhance midwifery led care, including offering antenatal care to small groups of women and undertaking an antenatal home visit towards the end of pregnancy, to provide women with the time to discuss any issues that they wanted to explore in more depth. The findings from this study contribute to the current body of knowledge on midwifery led care particularly in providing the women's perspective on partnership working. Women want to experience midwifery care that meets their psycho-social needs as well as bio-medical needs through a model of care that provides continuity. In contrast to previous research findings, the women in this study described community based care as mechanistic, clinically focused and time bound, more in line with an obstetric model of care than a midwifery model. However, midwifery led care offered within a birth centre was perceived by women as providing a more holistic, social model of care. Whilst continuity of care is not a new concept, what this study contributes is that despite successive administrations supporting partnership working and informed choice over the past twenty years, most of the women in this study did not experience this level of care. The findings from this study resulted in the development of a midwifery partnership model as a theoretical framework that could be utilised in future research studies to evaluate the extent to which a partnership relationship exists within a range of midwifery care settings
Changing trends in young people's food behaviour and wellbeing in England in relation to family affluence between 2005 and 2014( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

ABSTRACT: Research shows that healthy eating improves outcomes for children and that inequalities in diet are socially determined. However, little is known about how associations between household income and the diet intake of children and young people change over time. Descriptive analysis was carried out using the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children survey data for England for the years 2005, 2009 and 2014 to examine how breakfast, fruit, vegetable and soft drink consumption compares for young people aged 11–15 years by family affluence (low versus medium/high), gender and wellbeing measures. The results show young people in the low FAS group generally reporting less healthy eating behaviours, and differences by gender such as more soft/sugary drink consumption and lower consumption of fruit and vegetables for boys. Young people in the low FAS group also tend to have lower self-reported ratings on other wellbeing measures examined. There is evidence of a 'closing gap' between the FAS groups over time in terms of some behaviours. The patterns reported here are complex to interpret but do highlight some potentially positive effects of policies for addressing poor diets and dietary inequalities as well as some concerns given the UK context of continuing political uncertainty
Key data on adolescence 2013 : the latest information and statistics about young people today by John C Coleman( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Obesogenic behaviours in South Asian adolescents in England: a literature review and quantitative investigation( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Key data on adolescence 2009
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English (26)