WorldCat Identities

Larkins, A. Guy

Overview
Works: 22 works in 32 publications in 1 language and 211 library holdings
Genres: Abstracts  Reviews 
Roles: Author
Classifications: H62, 300.71273
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by A. Guy Larkins
Decision-making in a democracy by James P Shaver( Book )

2 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 73 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Teacher enthusiasm : a critical review( Book )

3 editions published between 1984 and 1985 in English and held by 56 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Progress and the environment: water and air pollution by James P Shaver( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reviews of dissertations in social studies, 1980 by A. Guy Larkins( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The analysis of public issues program : instructor's manual by James P Shaver( Book )

3 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Police and black America by A. Guy Larkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Race riots in the sixties by A. Guy Larkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The analysis of public issues. concepts, materials, research by James Shaver( Book )

2 editions published in 1969 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Analysis of Public Issues Concepts, Materials, Research. Final Report by James P Shaver( Book )

2 editions published in 1969 in Undetermined and English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Part I of this social studies report presents the results of curricular research, at Utah State University, to develop a set of "critical thinking" concepts appropriate for the analysis of political-ethical public issues, and to prepare materials and suggestions for teaching those concepts. The analytic concepts, presented in both outline and narrative form, are the nature of decisions about public issues, the need for order, the nature and importance of language, arguments over words, disagreements over facts, disagreement over values. Thirty-three "teaching bundles" detail suggestions for teaching these concepts. Part II of the report describes efforts to repeat and extend the research of the Harvard Project, which investigated the effects of two teaching styles (socratic and recitation) and the interactions of student personality with teaching style in affecting learning. (References, tables, and figures are included.) (MF)
The analysis of public issues. concepts, materials, research by James Shaver( Book )

1 edition published in 1969 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Critique of NAEP Objectives: Citizenship and Social Studies [and] Critique of NAEP Procedures Task 1. Final Report Parts 1 and 2 by A. Guy Larkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The first part of Task 1 of the final report provides a critique of National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) objectives. The report represents part of an investigation coordinated by a special Steering Committee working under the auspices of the National Council for the Social Studies. The first section examines whether the objectives meet the NAEP criteria that specialists in the subject area consider authentic from the viewpoint of the discipline, that school people recognize as desirable educational goals, and that parents agree are important for youth to know. The second section analyzes whether objectives meet the National Council for Social Studies Curriculum Guidelines of knowledge, abilities, valuing, and social participation. Section 3 examines whether the current objectives for citizenship and social studies overlap with objectives from other NAEP subject area assessments. Part 2 of the final report on Task 1 examines the criteria and procedures used to develop citizenship and social studies exercises for the assessment. The technical aspects of instrumentation, sampling, data analysis, and procedures are analyzed for validity and reliability. (DE) Primary type of information provided by report: Results (Evaluation) (Interpretation)
Do Elementary Social Studies Textbooks Teach Place Vocabulary? How To Supplement Weak Texts by Ben A Smith( Book )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Social Studies textbooks from grades 1-4 published by Macmillan (1985), Scott Foresman (1986), and Silver Burdett & Ginn (1988) were selected for review to assess the position given by these books to geographic place vocabulary. Each was evaluated on the basis of frequency and continuity of places named, the attention to stressing place name importance, directing the use of drill, and evidence of suggesting mnemonic devices to teach place vocabulary. Silver Burdett appears to have done the best job of presenting place names in a manner that would facilitate easy recall by students using those books. Four problems are seen with students successfully developing place vocabularies: (1) place vocabulary development is not a stated goal, skill, or objective in any of the series examined; (2) teachers are not encouraged to have students memorize a place vocabulary; (3) drill and mnemonic devices are not activities suggested for teaching a place vocabulary; and (4) there is a lack of focus on a manageable number of places as consistent points of reference. The establishment of a place name vocabulary must become a priority for teaching students to be competent citizens. Teachers should identify the map/globe locations of places at every opportunity. They should select a manageable number of places as a fundamental place vocabulary and employ drill and mnemonic devices to help students memorize these place names. Three tables and a 10-item bibliography are included. (JB)
Assessing achievement on a first-grade economics course of study by A. Guy Larkins( )

3 editions published in 1968 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Despite the surge of interest in economic education in the elementary school in the last two decades, there have been very few attempts to assess the ability of young children to learn economic concepts. In the primary grades, this problem is compounded by the difficulty of measuring knowledge in six and seven year old children. Objectives The primary objective of this dissertation was to determine whether first-grade children can learn the basic concepts in Our Working World: Families at Work. Since instruments suitable for assessing achievement on Families at Work were not available when this study was initiated, a secondary objective was to develop adequate achievement tests. Procedures Four Primary Economics Tests for Grade One (PET-1 ) were developed: The YES-NO, Matched-Pairs, All-NO, and Picture tests. These four tests were compared for reliability and validity. Reliability of the Matched-Pairs, All-NO, and Picture tests was adequate for the major purposes of this study, such as comparing group means. However, the Picture test lacked content validity 1n the sense that it was not comprehensive--it sampled only a few of the major concepts in Families at Work. And the All-NO test confounded acquiescence-set with knowledge of the content of Families at Work. It was concluded that the Matched-Pairs test had adequate reliability and validity for studies such as this one. To determine if elementary students could learn the concepts in Families at Work, control and experimental groups of children were selected from one urban, one rural, and two suburban areas of northern Utah. An experimental group of children was also tested in Elkhart, Indiana--where Our Working World: Families at Work was developed under the direction of Lawrence Senesh. Children were given the PET-1 tests and a test of mental ability. In comparing PET-1 means, analysis of covariance was used to adjust for differences in mental ability between control and experimental groups. Chi-square was used in item analyses to determine whether the first-grade children learned individual concepts 1n Families at Work. Conclusions The investigations of pupil learning led to five conclusions: 1. There were general indications that first-grade children can learn the content of Families at Work. In each of four studies--two which were central to this dissertation--PET-1 means for the experimental groups were significantly larger than the.01 level than for the control groups. 2. There were no major concepts in Families at Work which first-grade children did not learn. Each concept was learned by some students on at least a simple level of abstractness and complexity. 3. Families at Work was not too easy for bright first-grade children. Even very intelligent children failed to demonstrate complete mastery of the major concepts in Families at Work. No student obtained a perfect or near-perfect PET-1 score. 4. Families at Work was not too difficult for slow students. Slow students demonstrated that they learned some of the content of Families at Work. Those students in the experimental groups who were at least six months below grade-level obtained significantly (.01 level) higher PET-1 scores than did similar students in the control groups. 5. Special training or experience does not seem to be necessary in order for teachers to adequately instruct fist-grade children in the content of Families at Work. PET-1 means for students in Elkhart, Indiana did not differ at the.05 level of significance from PET-2 means for the other experimental groups
Conceptions of Democratic Citizenship in Supreme Court Cases by Douglas A Dixon( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Citizenship education is a major purpose of schools. What this entails, however, is highly disputable. Recently scholars have suggested that schools should teach and model citizenship values and principles that emphasize freedom of expression, the exclusion of religion from public spheres, and equal protection. These scholars support their conclusions with opinions written by the Supreme Court. This paper addresses the lack of balance these scholars bring to the debate about democratic values evinced in the United States Constitution and Supreme Court opinions. The paper suggests that educators should be wary of teaching one set of values to the neglect of others. More importantly, it argues that citizenship education is not about teaching the "right" values but about teaching the totality of democratic values and the conflicting and competing nature of these values along with the knowledge and attitudes citizenship participation entails. Contains 22 references. (Author/BT)
Race riots in the sixties, [by] A. Guy Larkins [and] James Shaver by A. Guy Larkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Comparison of Yes-No, Matched-Pairs, and All-No Scoring of a First-Grade Economics Achievement Test by A. Guy Larkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1968 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Developing practical achievement tests for use at the primary-grade level is a difficult task. Some problems encountered appear to be resolved by using verbally administered yes-no tests. But such tests are criticized as having a low reliability because they offer only two choices. Two modifications of the yes-no test have been proposed to increase reliability. One is the "matched-pairs" technique, in which every "yes" item has a matching item to be answered "no". Both items must be answered correctly for either to be counted. The second technique of the all-no test, an attempt to counter the children's proclivity to answer "yes" even when the answer is not known. Some 200 first grade children were administered an economics test, in which all three techniques were used. The test scores indicated that the all-no test had the greatest reliability, but it was less valid than the matched-pairs test. Thus, the matched-pairs test would be the best way to construct the yes-no type of achievement tests. Another article by the same authors (see PS 001 819) also deals with the subject. (WD)
SRA Economics Materials in Grades One and Two. Evaluation Reports by James P Shaver( Book )

1 edition published in 1966 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A class of first graders and a class of second graders in four Salt Lake City schools comprised the experimental sample in a study whose objectives were (1) to develop a test for assessing learning with "Our Working World" materials, published by Science Research Associate (SRA), and (2) to determine if students using the materials made greater learning gains than students not using them. Four classes at each grade level were randomly selected from two schools and served as controls in the investigation. Approximately 400 children took part in the study. Both the experimentals and the controls were given the SRA Test of General Ability. The Primary Economic Test--First Grade (PET-1) of 64 items (devised for this project) was administered to the children after the materials had been used for 3 months. Analysis of covariance was used to adjust group means for differences of scholastic aptitude. It was concluded that (1) the assessment instrument (PET-1) was valuable in testing student progress and (2) the experimental first graders scored significantly higher on the test than did the control students. Attachment A of this document is the PET-1, attachment B contains instructions for administering the test, and attachment C is a chart of selected percentiles and the ranges for the experimental and control groups. (DO)
Economics learning in grade one : the USU assessment studies by A. Guy Larkins( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The analysis of public issues program. by James P Shaver( Visual )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Matched-Pair Scoring Technique Used on a First-Grade Yes-No Type Economics Achievement Test by A. Guy Larkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1967 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

There exist special problems in testing first-grade children. Orally administered yes-no tests reduce the problems found in the other types, but they have their own drawbacks. A solution to some of these drawbacks is the use of the matched-pair scoring technique. For each "yes" item on the test there is included a "reversed" or "no" item on the same concept being tested, and vice versa. The pupil must respond correctly to both in order to be given credit for either one. However, the drawback then becomes the necessity of doubling the size of the test. A 30-item test, based on "families at work" economics, was administered to six first grade classes; three had bee n studying the material, and three had not. The test results showed that (1) the matched-pair scoring technique increased the reliability of the yes-no test and also increased and general discriminatory power of the test and (2) the students who were studying the economics material scored higher than students who were not, indicating that the program was resulting in demonstrable learning. Another article by the same authors (see PS 001 822) also deals with this subject. (WD)
 
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English (29)