WorldCat Identities

Rubin, Robert Terry

Overview
Works: 26 works in 68 publications in 1 language and 1,788 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses 
Roles: Editor, Author, Contributor
Classifications: QP356.45, 571.71
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Robert Terry Rubin
Principles of hormone/behavior relations by Donald W Pfaff( )

28 editions published between 2003 and 2018 in English and held by 1,730 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Introduces underlying principles of the endocrine regulation of behavior in animals and humans. Every chapter begins by stating a principle, followed by specific examples of hormone actions derived from scientific experiments and clinical observations, and concludes with a few challenging unanswered questions. The reference source Hormones, Brain & Behavior identified this field as rapidly expanding within neurobiology and endocrinology
Hormones, Brain and Behavior, Five-Volume Set by R. Arthur Arnold( )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hormones, Brain, and Behavior is a comprehensive work discussing the effect of hormones on the brain and, subsequently, behavior. This five-volume major reference work has 106 chapters covering a broad range of topics with an extensive discussion of the effects of hormones on insects, fish, amphibians, birds, rodents, and humans. To truly understand all aspects of our behavior, we must take every influence (including the hormonal influences) into consideration. Donald Pfaff and a number of well-qualified editors examine and discuss how we are influenced by hormonal factors, offering insight, an
Hormone/behavior relations of clinical importance : endocrine systems interacting with brain and behavior by Robert H Rubin( Book )

4 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The study of hormones as they impact the brain and, subsequently, behavior is a central topic in neuroscience, endocrinology and psychiatry. This volume offers an overview of neuroendocrinological topics, approaching the subject from the perspective of hormone-brain function, hormone-behavior relations, sex differences, and the impact on various diseases/pathologies. Many basic human behavioral functions are subject to the influence of hormones - sexual orientation, the experience of pain, fertility, immunity - as are clinical conditions such as diabetes, substance abuse disorder, eating disorders, PTSD, TBI, pain, Alzheimer's, stress/anxiety, affective disorders, and more
Hormones, brain, and behavior by Donald W Pfaff( Book )

4 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hormones, Brain, and Behavior is a comprehensive work discussing the effect of hormones on the brain and, subsequently, behavior. This five-volume major reference work has 106 chapters covering a broad range of topics with an extensive discussion of the effects of hormones on insects, fish, amphibians, birds, rodents, and humans. To truly understand all aspects of our behavior, we must take every influence (including the hormonal influences) into consideration. Donald Pfaff and a number of well-qualified editors examine and discuss how we are influenced by hormonal factors, offering insight, and information on the lives of a variety of species. Hormones, Brain, and Behavior offers the reader comprehensive coverage of an emerging and prominent field with a state-of-the-art overview of hormonally-mediated behaviors. The set provides unique treatment of all major vertebrate and invertebrate model systems with excellent opportunities for relating behavior to molecular genetics. The topics cover an unusual breadth (from molecules to ecophysiology), ranging from basic science to clinical research, making this reference of interest to a broad range of scientists in a variety of fields
Chemical Index to Fitness (Biochemical Correlates of Stress in Specialized Populations)( Book )

5 editions published between 1972 and 1976 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The report discusses studies on the characteristics of the release of both anterior and posterior pituitary hormones as well as their target organ hormones, in human subjects under several different conditions of central nervous system activity. These studies are encompassing the biorhythms of these hormones and the specific interrelationships of pituitary hormones interacting on their target organ glands
The Psychobiology of alcoholism : international symposium, Beverly Hills, California, January 16-18, 1983( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Multiple biochemical correlates of manicdepressive illness( Book )

2 editions published in 1968 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Several biochemical parameters were investigated in an attempt to elucidate changing patterns of physiologic activity with changes in mood in manic-depressive illness. Two hospitalized rapidly cycling manic-depressive patients underwent daily clinical ratings of mood, daily measurements of blood pressure and weight, and daily 24-hour urine collections for creatinine, 17- hydroxycorticosteroids (17-OHCS) vanillylmandelic acid (VMA), kynurenine, and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Mean daily excretion was calculated for each variable measured for each clinical phase. The following results were obtained and discussed: (1) Urine volume and creatinine excretion were lower during depression, most likely on the basis of reduced fluid intake. (2) VMA excretion was higher during mania and correlated with level of physical activity. (3) Kynurenine excretion was lower during depression, possibly on the basis of heightened metabolism of kynurenine during depression. (4) IAA excretion was increased during depression, although variations in daily levels during all phases were considerable. The multiple biochemical variables reported suggest both inter-subject and intra-subject differences in patterns of physiologic activity in patients with rapidly cycling mood disorders. The results highlight the difficulty inherent in inferring central mechanisms from the measurement of peripheral variables
The role of prolactin in the regulation of testosterone secretion in normal adult men by Robert Terry Rubin( )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Principles of hormone/behavior relations, second edition by Donald W Pfaff( Book )

2 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chemical Index to Fitness( Book )

2 editions published between 1971 and 1980 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An investigation of the interrelationships of anterior pituitary hormones in stress situations is presented. The study concerns the release of anterior pituitary hormones in normal young adult men during all-night plans to continue and extend these studies to determine the characteristics of the release of each of the anterior pituitary hormones in human subjects under a number of conditions of central nervous system activity, including field stress situations are in progress. These studies will also encompass the circadian rhythms of the release of these hormones, an important aspect of anterior pituitary physiology
Postnatal Maturation Patterns of Serum Corticosterone and Growth Hormone in Rats: Effect of Chronic Thyroxine Administration( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

SERUM URIC ACID AND CHOLESTEROL VARIABILITY: A COMPREHENSIVE VIEW OF UNDERWATER DEMOLITION TEAM TRAINING( )

1 edition published in 1968 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

One-third of a Navy underwater demolition team training class (32 men) was investigated by thrice weekly psychological assessment and serum uric acid and cholesterol determinations until they either dropped from training or graduated. In general, significant elevations in serum uric acid occurred when trainees were eagerly taking on arduous activities with an optimistic attitude and determination to succeed. Significant elevations in serum cholesterol levels were seen in environmental variables, when they were relatively physically inactive, and for selected individuals, when they failed portions of the training course
Principles of Hormone by Robert Terry Rubin( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Salivary and Plasma Testosterone and Cortisol during Moderately Heavy Exercise( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Saliva may provide a useful alternative to blood for measuring steroid hormones. total plasma and salivary concentrations of cortisol and testosterone were compared in samples taken twice at rest and twice during exercise to determine whether physical activity level affects the relationship between the two. Correlations were consistently high (r>.82) for cortisol, but relatively low for testosterone (r<.66). Exercise did not affect either correlation. Salivary cortisol is a reasonable alternative to plasma cortisol even during exercise. The testosterone results were equivocal as salivary testosterone could be highly correlated with free plasma testosterone despite the low correlation to total plasma testosterone. Closer examination of the free/total plasma hormone distinction was not possible in the present study, but should be an important focus for further research on salivary steroids
A Highly Specific Radioimmunoassay for the Measurement of Caffeine in Saliva( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Using a tritiated (3H) caffeine tracer and a murine monoclonal anti- caffeine antibody, we developed a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the detection of caffeine (1,3,7 trimethylxanthine) in saliva. The assay shows <2% cross reactivity with theophylline and avoids interference from anti-mouse immunoglobulin (IgG) constituents found in serum but not in saliva. Saliva caffeine represents the unbound (biologically active) fraction of the drug. Assay values correlate well (r=.44, p<.05) with oral caffeine doses between 150 and 400 mg. The half-life of salivary caffeine of about six hours, based on the elimination curve for the subjects who received 400 mg, agrees with previous measurements of its half-life in serum. Caffeine, Saliva, Radioimmunoassay, Half-life
DIFFERENTIAL ADRENOCORTICAL STRESS RESPONSES IN NAVAL AVIATORS DURING AIRCRAFT CARRIER LANDING PRACTICE( )

1 edition published in 1970 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Serum cortisol levels were measured in 9 Navy pilots and their flight officers during aircraft carrier landing practice in the two-man F-4B jet aircraft. The pilots showed an unequivocal adrenocortical stress response; the flight officers did not. The complex and hazardous task of carrier landing appears to be a considerably greater stress on the 'executive' naval aviator (the pilot in control of the aircraft) than on his passive partner, although both are exposed to the same dangers. The findings of this study highlight the importance of the active versus the passive role as a determinant of stress intensity in human Ss exposed to naturally occurring stress situations
Antidiuretic Hormone: Episodic Nocturnal Secretion in Adult Men( Book )

1 edition published in 1975 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Declines in swimming performance with age: a longitudinal study of Masters swimming champions by Robert Terry Rubin( )

1 edition published in 2013 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

INTRODUCTION: Because of its many participants and thorough records, competitive Masters swimming offers a rich data source for determining the rate of physical decline associated with aging in physically fit individuals. The decline in performance among national champion swimmers, both men and women and in short and long swims, is linear, at about 0.6% per year up to age 70-75, after which it accelerates in quadratic fashion. These conclusions are based primarily on cross-sectional studies, and little is known about individual performance declines with aging. Herein we present performance profiles of 19 male and 26 female national and international champion Masters swimmers, ages 25 to 96 years, participating in competitions for an average of 23 years. METHODS AND RESULTS: Swimmers' longitudinal data were compared with the fastest times of world record holders across ages 35-100 years by two regression methods. Neither method proved to accurately model this data set: compared with the rates of decline estimated from the world record data, which represent the best recorded times at given ages, there was bias toward shallower rates of performance decline in the longitudinal data, likely owing to a practice effect in some swimmers as they began their Masters programs. In swimmers' later years, once maximum performance had been achieved, individual profiles followed the decline represented in the world records, and a few swimmers became the world record holders. In some instances, the individual profiles indicated performance better than the world record data; these swimmers achieved their times after the world record data were collected in 2005-2006. CONCLUSION: Declining physiological functional capacity occurs with advancing age, and this is reflected in the performance decrements of aging Masters swimmers. Individual swimmers show different performance trajectories with aging, declines being mitigated by practice, which improves both physiological capacity and swim
Psychological Correlates of Cortisol Excretion in Normal Individuals Under Stress( Book )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Cortisol excretion is a potential biological link between psychosocial stimuli and illness, but recent studies of normal individuals in everyday settings generally have failed to demonstrate significant correlations between cortisol excretion and perceived stress, emotion, and personality. Psychological correlates of salivary cortisol excretion were investigated in military recruits during basic training to determine whether different results would be obtained when normal individuals were under stress. Negative mood, particularly depressed mood, predicted higher cortisol excretion. Although personality and perceived stress did not significantly predict cortisol excretion, a trend toward higher cortisol excretion in recruits who felt highly pressured replicated a similar finding reported in another study. The major conclusion is that cortisol excretion is related to negative affect in normals facing situations which demand substantial psychological and behavioral adaptation. Further study is needed to determine the direction of casuality for this association and to further explore the role of personality and perceived stress in relation to emotion and cortisol excretion
The Psychobiology of Human Aggression( Book )

1 edition published in 1971 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of the paper is to consider the relative importance of some of the psychophysiologic concomitants of human aggression. (Author)
 
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Principles of hormone/behavior relations
Covers
Hormones, Brain and Behavior, Five-Volume SetHormone/behavior relations of clinical importance : endocrine systems interacting with brain and behaviorHormones, brain, and behavior
Alternative Names
Rubin, R. T.

Rubin, Robert T.

Languages
English (61)