WorldCat Identities

Berger, Harry Jr 1924-

Overview
Works: 36 works in 225 publications in 1 language and 11,413 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Self-portraits  Oral histories  Interviews 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Classifications: PR2364, 821.3
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Harry Berger
Spenser; a collection of critical essays by Harry Berger( Book )

16 editions published in 1968 in English and held by 1,907 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wide-ranging opinions on the language and symbolism of Spenser's poetry
The allegorical temper; vision and reality in book II of Spenser's Faerie queene by Harry Berger( Book )

25 editions published between 1957 and 1967 in English and held by 896 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Caterpillage : reflections on seventeenth century Dutch still life painting by Harry Berger( )

13 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 844 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The book begins with a critique of iconographic discourse and particularly of iconography's treatment of vanitas symbolism. It goes on to argue that this treatment tends to divert attention from still life's darker meanings and from the true character of its traffic with death. Interpretations of still life that focus on the vanity of human experience and the mutability of life minimize the impact made by the representation of such voracious pillagers of plant life as insects, snails, and caterpillars. The message sent by still life's preoccupation with these small-scale predators is not merely vanitas
Figures of a changing world : metaphor and the emergence of modern culture by Harry Berger( )

10 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 722 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book offers a dramatic new account of cultural change, an account based on the distinction between two familiar rhetorical figures, metonymy and metaphor. The book treats metonymy as the basic organizing trope of traditional culture and metaphor as the basic organizing trope of modern culture. On the one hand, metonymies present themselves as analogies that articulate or reaffirm preexisting states of affairs. They are guarantors of facticity, a term that can be translated or defined as fact-like-ness. On the other hand, metaphors challenge the similarity they claim to establish, in order to feature departures from preexisting states of affairs. On the basis of this distinction, the author argues that metaphor and metonymy can be used as instruments both for the large-scale interpretation of tensions in cultural change and for the micro-interpretation of tensions within particular texts. In addressing the functioning of the two terms, the author draws upon and critiques the work of Friedrich Nietzsche, Roman Jakobson, Christian Metz, Paul Ricoeur, Umberto Eco, Edmund Leach, and Paul de Man
A fury in the words : love and embarrassment in Shakespeare's Venice by Harry Berger( )

10 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in English and held by 688 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Shakespeare's two Venetian plays are dominated by the discourse of embarrassment. The Merchant of Venice is a comedy of embarrassment, and Othello is a tragedy of embarrassment. This nomenclature is admittedly anachronistic, because the term "embarrassment" didn't enter the language until the late seventeenth century. To embarrass is to make someone feel awkward or uncomfortable, humiliated or ashamed. Such feelings may respond to specific acts of criticism, blame, or accusation. "To embarrass" is literally to "embar" to put up a barrier or deny access. The bar of embarrassment may be raised by unpleasant experiences. It may also be raised when people are denied access to things, persons, and states of being they desire or to which they feel entitled. The Venetian plays represent embarrassment not merely as a condition but as a weapon and as the wound the weapon inflicts. Characters in The Merchant of Venice and Othello devote their energies to embarrassing one another. But even when the weapon is sheathed, it makes its presence felt, as when Desdemona means to praise Othello and express her love for him: "I saw Othello's visage in his mind" (1.3.253). This suggests, among other things, that she didn't see it in his face."--Publisher's website
Manhood, marriage & mischief : Rembrandt's 'Night watch' and other Dutch group portraits by Harry Berger( Book )

15 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 643 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A study of the theory and practice of seventeenth-century Dutch group portraits, Manhood, Marriage, and Mischief offers an account of the genre's comic and ironic features, which it treats as comments on the social context of portrait sitters who are husbands and householders as well as members of civic and proto-military organizations."--Jacket
Imaginary audition : Shakespeare on stage and page by Harry Berger( Book )

12 editions published between 1989 and 1991 in English and held by 582 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Second world and green world : studies in Renaissance fiction-making by Harry Berger( Book )

11 editions published between 1988 and 1990 in English and held by 557 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Revisionary play : studies in the Spenserian dynamics by Harry Berger( Book )

17 editions published between 1988 and 1990 in English and held by 513 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fictions of the pose : Rembrandt against the Italian Renaissance by Harry Berger( Book )

12 editions published between 1999 and 2000 in English and held by 465 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The book is in four parts. Parts One and Two comprise an interpretive study of the technical and sociopolitical conditions within which portraiture becomes an important if problematic medium of self-representation in early modern Europe. The major portion of these two sections considers the structure and the consequences of a system of practices and conventions that governs poses in commissioned portraits. In Part Three the scene shifts from Italian to Dutch portraiture. Part Four is devoted to self-portraits by Rembrandt that are interpreted as responses to the conditions depicted in the first three parts
The perils of uglytown : studies in structural misanthropology from Plato to Rembrandt by Harry Berger( )

15 editions published between 2012 and 2016 in English and held by 429 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Perils of Uglytown develops a new concept, structural misanthropology, and traces its operation first in the dialogues of Plato and then in the work of humanists, playwrights, and painters of the Renaissance in Italy, England, and the Netherlands"--
Making trifles of terrors : redistributing complicities in Shakespeare by Harry Berger( Book )

10 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 428 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The absence of grace : sprezzatura and suspicion in two Renaissance courtesy books by Harry Berger( Book )

11 editions published between 2000 and 2001 in English and held by 378 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study of male fantasy, representation anxiety, and narratorial authority in two sixteenth-century books, Baldassare Castiglione's Libro del Cortegiano (1528) and Giovanni Della Casa's Il Galateo (1558). The book focuses on the way the Libro del Cortegiano and Il Galateo cope with and represent the interaction between changes of elite culture and the changing construction of masculine identity in early modern Europe. More specifically, it connects questions of male fantasy and masculine identity to questions about the authority and reliability of narrators, and shows how these questions surface in narratorial attitudes toward socioeconomic rank or class, political power, and gender
Human Security For All : a Tribute to Sergio Vieira de Mello by Harry Berger( )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 308 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Situated utterances : texts, bodies, and cultural representations by Harry Berger( Book )

7 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 251 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In Situated Utterances Berger designs an analytical model of New Criticism, shows how it was dismantled after the Second World War, and demonstrates practice in studies of specific works. The scope of the practice is broadened to the connection between cultural representations and institutional change. Plato's dialogues are also covered
Harrying : skills of offense in Shakespeare's Henriad by Harry Berger( Book )

7 editions published between 2014 and 2016 in English and held by 227 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Harrying considers Richard III and the four plays of Shakespeare's Henriad--Richard II, Henry IV Part 1, Henry IV Part 2, and Henry V. Berger combines close reading with cultural analysis to show how the language characters speak always says more than the speakers mean to say. Shakespeare's speakers try to say one thing. Their language says other things that often question the speakers' motives or intentions. Harrying explores the effect of this linguistic mischief on the representation of all the Henriad's major figures. It centers attention on the portrayal of Falstaff and on the bad faith that darkens the language and performance of Harry, the Prince of Wales who becomes King Henry V. --
Shakespeare and the Italian renaissance : appropriation, transformation, opposition by Michele Marrapodi( )

3 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 201 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book investigates the drama of Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the European Renaissance, in the context of Italian cultural, dramatic and literary traditions. Contributors perceive the Italian presence in early modern England not as a traditional treasure trove of influence and imitation, but as a potential cultural force, consonant with complex processes of appropriation, transformation, and ideological opposition through a continuous dialectical interchange of compliance and subversion
Ellis Island oral history project, series KECK, no. 063 interview of Harry Berger by Harry Berger( )

3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 65 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Why read & write? : a conversation about literacy with Harry Berger, Jr. by Louis E Haga( Book )

2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This conversation between Louis E. Haga and Harry Berger, Jr., Is part of the National Humanities Faculty "Why Series." The discussion in this booklet touches not only on reading and writing, but on some of the cultural and structural consequences of typography and print literacy. Some of the other topics discussed include reading critically, responding to poetry, reading the novel, developing language, generating student interests in reading and language, developing sensitive reading skills, and stimulating students to write. (Wr)
The critical world of Harry Berger, Jr. : an oral history by Harry Berger( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Harry Berger, Jr.'s oral history is an account of his perspective as a professor of literature, founding faculty member at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and literary critic. Throughout, he traces the parallel tracks of his pedagogy, campus engagement, and scholarship, considering points of intersection and core philosophies, addressing themes of change, conflict and continuity at UCSC. Berger defines himself as a critic above all else, and his training in New Criticism, with its trademark methodology of close reading, proves to be a consistent note both in his writing and in his approach to teaching and working at UCSC. After providing an overview of his early biography, discussing life in New York City and New Rochelle, he turns to his two loci at UCSC, Cowell College and the literature department. At the former, he was a teacher and dedicated participant in the original UCSC collegiate experiment, and at the latter, he was a passionate advocate of close reading as a core value for the new program. He applies close scrutiny to both entities, commenting candidly on the internal debates of the department, the styles and personas of his colleagues, and his own teaching in the college. Berger applies a nuanced take to the UCSC institution as a whole, commenting on the shift of the school away from its original collegiate model but rejecting the nostalgia of the "golden agers who think everything was better back then." In lieu of a narrative of decline or departure, he posits an ongoing growth of UCSC with a continuity of quality in faculty and students alike, and where it remains, occasional conflicts notwithstanding, "a wonderful place."
 
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Imaginary audition : Shakespeare on stage and page
Covers
Manhood, marriage & mischief : Rembrandt's 'Night watch' and other Dutch group portraitsImaginary audition : Shakespeare on stage and pageSecond world and green world : studies in Renaissance fiction-makingRevisionary play : studies in the Spenserian dynamicsFictions of the pose : Rembrandt against the Italian RenaissanceMaking trifles of terrors : redistributing complicities in ShakespeareThe absence of grace : sprezzatura and suspicion in two Renaissance courtesy booksSituated utterances : texts, bodies, and cultural representations
Alternative Names
Berger, Harry

Berger, Harry 1924-...

Berger, Harry Jr

Berger, Harry Jr. 1924-

Berger, Harry ml

Languages
English (210)