WorldCat Identities

Daggett, Stephen

Overview
Works: 99 works in 260 publications in 1 language and 3,332 library holdings
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Stephen Daggett
Defense funding for FY1995 : congressional action on supplemental appropriations and offsetting rescissions by Stephen Daggett( Book )

6 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 93 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

National missile defense : status of the debate by Stephen Daggett( Book )

5 editions published between 1997 and 1998 in English and held by 76 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The FY1992 budget debate : how much for defense? by Stephen Daggett( Book )

3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Persian Gulf War : U.S. costs and allied financial contributions by Stephen Daggett( Book )

4 editions published between 1991 and 1992 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Appropriations for FY2000 : defense by Stephen Daggett( Book )

6 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This report is a guide to one of the 13 regular appropriations bills that congress considers each year. It is designed to supplement the information provided by the House and Senate Defense Appropriations Subcommittees. It summarizes the current legislative status of the bill, its scope, major issues, funding levels, and related legislative activity. This report lists the key CRS staff relevant to the issues covered and related CRS products."
Defense budget for FY1992 : authorization and appropriations by Stephen Daggett( Book )

3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Defense budget for FY1992 : data summary by Stephen Daggett( Book )

4 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Military construction : current controversies and long-term issues by Martin Cohen( Book )

4 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Defense budget : alternative measures of costs of military commitments abroad by Stephen Daggett( Book )

3 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Appropriations for FY2001 : defense by Stephen Daggett( Book )

4 editions published between 2000 and 2001 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Appropriations are one part of a complex federal budget process that includes budget resolutions, appropriations (regular, supplemental, and continuing) bills, rescissions, and budget reconciliation bills. The process begins with the President's budget request and is bounded by the rules of the House and Senate, the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (as amended), the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, and current program authorizations. This report is a guide to one of the 13 regular appropriations bills that Congress considers each year. It is designed to supplement the information proveded by the House and Senate Defense Appropriations Subcommittees. It summarizes the current ligislative status of the bill, its scope, major issues, funding levels, and related legislative activity. The report lists the key CRS staff relevant to the issues covered and related CRS products. This report is updated as soon as possible after major legilative developments, especially following legislative action in the committees and on the floor of the House and Senate."--Page [i]
Authorization and appropriations for FY2003 : defense by Stephen Daggett( Book )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Appropriations and authorization for FY2002 : defense by Amy Belasco( Book )

5 editions published between 2001 and 2002 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On June 27, the Administration submitted an amended fiscal year 2002 defense budget request to Congress. The request totals $343.5 billion in funding for the national defense budget function, $18.4 billion more than in the initial White House budget plan, submitted on April 9, and $32.9 billion above the amount originally enacted for FY2001. The total includes funding for the Department of Defense and for defense-related activities of the Department of Energy and other agencies. Administration officials have characterized the amended request as a get well budget that focuses on military personnel and readiness, with decisions on major weapons programs deferred until the Administration completes its ongoing review of military strategy
The U.S. intelligence budget : a basic overview by Stephen Daggett( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The 9/11 Commission recommended that a new National Intelligence Director (NID) should have control over the personnel and budgets of all agencies that collect and analyze national foreign intelligence to foster more cooperation. This CRS report describes the intelligence budget and gives rough estimates of amounts for major components of the budget based on unclassified sources. It also reviews current procedures for formulating and executing the budget, and highlights how proposed legislation addresses the issue. Since 1995, the U.S. intelligence budget has been divided into three elements: the National Foreign Intelligence Program (NFIP), which, in principle, funds all foreign intelligence and counterintelligence activities of the government that respond to "national" needs, as opposed to the needs of a single department or agency; the Joint Military Intelligence Program (JMIP), overseen centrally by the Defense Department, which funds programs that respond to defense-wide intelligence requirements as opposed to the needs of a particular military service; and Tactical Intelligence and Related Activities (TIARA), which is an aggregation of funding for tactical military intelligence programs managed by the individual services. The Commission's recommendation would affect an estimated one-half to two-thirds of the intelligence budget, the portion devoted to the NFIP. For a more extensive description of the Defense Department agencies whose budgets are at issue, and a discussion of the pros and cons of giving greater authority over them to a National Intelligence Director, see CRS Report RL32515, "Intelligence Community Reorganization: Potential Effects on DOD Intelligence Agencies," by Richard Best. This report will be updated as events warrant
Defense budget : long-term challenges for FY2006 and beyond by Stephen Daggett( Book )

3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Over the next few months, Congress will be considering Administration requests for more than half a trillion dollars for national defense, including money in the regular defense budget for Fiscal Year 2006 (FY2006), supplemental appropriations for costs of ongoing military operations in FY2005, and, possibly, additional funds in FY2006 to provide a bridge until future supplemental appropriations for operations in Iraq and Afghanistan are available. The Administration's defense budget plans face some potentially daunting, though by no means unprecedented, long-term challenges, including: *Will projected budget deficits constrain the Administration's longterm defense budget plans? *Should Congress try to restrain further increases in military personnel pay and benefits, as some Administration officials have argued, in view of dramatic increases in personnel costs in recent years? *What are the implications of continuing, perennial increases in defense operation and maintenance costs for the affordability of the Administration's plan? *How affordable is the Administration's long-term plan for modernizing military forces in light of substantial and continuing cost growth in many systems? *How might recent widely discussed changes in defense strategy affect priorities within the defense budget? This report reviews long-term trends in the defense budget and discusses the challenges Congress and the Defense Department may face in trying to adjust plans in the face of fiscal constraints. It will be updated periodically to reflect congressional action and new information
Costs of major U.S. wars by Stephen Daggett( Book )

7 editions published between 2008 and 2010 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This CRS report provides estimates of the costs of major U.S. wars from the American Revolution through current conflicts in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere. It gives figures both in "current year dollars", that is, in prices in effect at the time of each war, and in inflation-adjusted constant dollars updated to the most recently available estimates of FY2008 prices. All estimates are of the costs of military operations only and do not include costs of veterans benefits, interest paid for borrowing money to finance wars, or assistance to allies. The report also provides estimates of the cost of each war as a share of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) during the peak year of each conflict and of overall defense spending as a share of GDP at the peak. This report will be updated periodically to reflect additional appropriations for ongoing conflicts and to adjust constant dollar figures to prices of the current fiscal year
FY2009 Spring Supplemental Appropriations for Overseas Contingency Operations( Book )

5 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On April 9, 2009, the White House sent Congress a request for $83.4 billion in supplemental appropriations for defense, foreign affairs, domestic fire fighting, and other purposes for the remainder of FY2009. Of the total, $75.5 billion is for Department of Defense and intelligence activities related to operations in Iraq and Afghanistan; $3.7 billion, offset by $3.4 billion of rescissions, is for other defense programs; and $7.1 billion is for international affairs. These amounts are being requested in addition to $70 billion in FY2009 supplemental funding for defense and foreign affairs that Congress approved in June, 2008. In P.L. 110-252 (H.R. 2462), which was signed into law on June 30, Congress provided a supplemental defense "bridge fund" of $65.9 billion to cover the costs of military operations through the first several months of FY2009 and also appropriated $4.0 billion in emergency supplemental FY2009 funds for foreign affairs. Amounts for defense in the bridge fund and in the regular FY2009 defense appropriations act (P.L. 110-161, H.R. 2764) were expected to be sufficient to finance Army and Marine Corps operations through June of this year. In testimony before the House Budget Committee on March 18, 2009, DoD Comptroller Robert Hale urged Congress to approve supplemental funding before the Memorial Day recess to avoid financial disruptions. The new request, together with the enacted $65.9 billion bridge fund, will bring total supplemental defense funding for FY2009 to $145 billion. This amount is significantly less than the $170 billion that Congress provided in FY2007 and the $187 billion in FY2008. The change is due almost entirely to a reduction in the amount requested for weapons procurement, which falls from $64 billion in FY2008 to $28 billion in FY2009. In preliminary statements about the defense supplemental, Representative Murtha and Senator Inouye both announced plans to add significant amounts to the request for major weapon systems
Defense: FY2009 Authorization and Appropriations by Pat Towell( Book )

9 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The President's FY2009 federal budget request, released February 4, 2008, included $611.1 billion in new budget authority for national defense. This total included $515.4 billion in discretionary new budget authority for the base budget of the Department of Defense (DOD) i.e., activities not associated with combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. The budget included an additional $2.9 billion in mandatory spending for the DOD base budget and $22.8 billion for non-war related defense costs of the Department of Energy and other agencies. In addition to the $541.1 billion requested for the base line (i.e., non-war cost) budget, the request also included $70 billion to cover war costs in the first part of FY2009. On April 30 the Senate Armed Services Committee approved its version of the FY2009 defense authorization bill (S. 3001), authorizing the appropriation of $612.5 billion in new budget authority for national security programs, including $542.5 billion for the base line budget and a $70 billion allowance for war-related costs. The committee approved without major change the funding requests for several programs that have been the subject of controversy, including the Army's Future Combat Systems (FCS), the Navy's DDG-1000 destroyer, and the Air Force's KC-45A midair refueling tanker. The committee bill would add to the request $497 million to either continue or terminate production of the Air Force's F-22 fighter. It also would add to the request $465 million to continue development of an alternate engine for the F-35 Joint Strike fighter and $35 million to improve the engine currently slated for installation. The Senate may take up the bill before the August recess. In related action, the House passed its version of the defense authorization bill (H.R. 5658) on May 22 authorizing $612.5 billion, including $70 billion for war related costs. The bill would deny authorization of the $2.5 billion requested for a third ship of the DDG-1000 class
FY2007 supplemental appropriations for Defense, Foreign Affairs, and other purposes( Book )

4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

On March 23, by a vote of 218-212, the House approved H.R. 1591, a bill providing $124 billion in supplemental appropriations for FY2007 and requiring the redeployment of U.S. troops out of Iraq. The bill's rule allowed no amendments and opponents did not offer a motion to recommit. The Senate Appropriations Committee marked up and reported its version of a supplemental appropriations bill, S. 965, on March 22, and floor action began on March 26. The Senate took up the House-passed bill and substituted the text of S. 965, and subsequent debate in the Senate has proceeded using the House number, H.R. 1591
Defense: FY2008 Authorization and Appropriations by Stephen Daggett( Book )

10 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This report is a guide to one of the regular appropriations bills that Congress considers each year. It is designed to supplement the information provided by the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees on Defense. For both defense authorization and appropriations, this report summarizes the status of the bills, their scope, major issues, funding levels, and related congressional activity. This report is updated as events warrant and lists the key CRS staff relevant to the issues covered as well as related CRS products. The House passed its version of the FY2008 defense authorization bill, H.R. 1585, on May 17. The Senate Armed Services Committee finished drafting its counterpart bill, S. 567, on May 24. Senate action on the bill is expected in June. On February 5, 2007, the White House formally released to Congress its FY2008 federal budget request, which included $647.2 billion in new budget authority for national defense. In addition to $483.2 billion for the regular operations of the Department of Defense (DoD), the request includes $141.7 billion for continued military operations, primarily to fund the campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, $17.4 billion for the nuclear weapons and other defense-related programs of the Department of Energy, and $5.2 billion for defense-related activities of other agencies. The $483.2 billion requested for DoD's "base" budget, that is, the request for regular operations excluding the cost of ongoing combat activity. is $46.8 billion higher than the agency's base budget for FY2007, an increase of 11% in nominal terms and, by DoD's reckoning, an increase in real purchasing power of 8.0%, taking into account the cost of inflation. The FY2008 base request would continue a permanent increase in active-duty end-strength for the Army and Marine Corps, as many Members of Congress have recommended for years, with a goal of adding 92,000 active duty troops to the two services by FY2012, compared with pre-Iraq War levels
Authorization and Appropriations for FY2005: Defense by Stephen Daggett( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The annual consideration of appropriations bills (regular, continuing, and supplemental) by Congress is part of a complex set of budget processes that also encompasses the consideration of budget resolutions, revenue and debt-limit legislation, other spending measures, and reconciliation bills. In addition, the operation of programs and the spending of appropriated funds are subject to constraints established in authorizing statutes. Congressional action on the budget for a fiscal year usually begins following the submission of the President's budget at the beginning of each annual session of Congress. Congressional practices governing the consideration of appropriations and other budgetary measures are rooted in the Constitution, the standing rules of the House and Senate, and statutes, such as the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974. This report is a guide to one of the 13 regular appropriations bills that Congress considers each year. It is designed to supplement the information provided by the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees on Defense. It summarizes the status of the bill, its scope, major issues, funding levels, and related congressional activity, and is updated as events warrant. The report lists the key CRS staff relevant to the issues covered and related CRS products. NOTE: A Web version of this document is available to congressional staff at [http://www.crs.gov/products/appropriations/apppage.shtml]
 
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Alternative Names
Dājit, Stīfan

Dājjitt, Stīfan

داجت, ستيفن

ستيفن داجت

Languages
English (96)