WorldCat Identities

Hopkins, Mark 1802-1887

Overview
Works: 218 works in 815 publications in 2 languages and 10,269 library holdings
Genres: History  Sermons  Sources 
Roles: Author
Classifications: BT1101, 378.744
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Mark Hopkins
 
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Most widely held works by Mark Hopkins
Lectures on the evidences of Christianity : before the Lowell Institute, January, 1844 by Mark Hopkins( Book )

40 editions published between 1846 and 2009 in English and held by 561 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"With our American Philosophy and Religion series, Applewood reissues many primary sources published throughout American history. Through these books, scholars, interpreters, students, and non-academics alike can see the thoughts and beliefs of Americans who came before us."
An outline study of man, or, The body and mind in one system : with illustrative diagrams, and a method for blackboard teaching by Mark Hopkins( Book )

50 editions published between 1873 and 2018 in English and Undetermined and held by 555 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The substance of the lectures was preserved in a phonographic report. This, it was found, would be of so much aid in writing them out that the form of lectures and the phraseology appropriate to them have been retained, though the references to the board were so many and of such a character that a recast of many portions has been found necessary. As read, the lectures would scarcely convey a correct impression of the extent to which the board was used. The method of teaching an abstract subject other than Mathematics through the eye has long been practiced in Logic, but until recently has been chiefly confined to that. So far as I know, the first to apply it generally and with success was my friend Mr. Dickinson of the Westfield Normal School. This is not object-teaching. That consists in showing the object itself, but this is the teaching of relations, which are invisible, by means of things that are visible. This facilitates the holding of abstract subjects steadily before the mind, and I cannot but hope a good deal from it in the way of popularizing studies of this kind. I shall be content if this work shall awaken in the community a wider interest in the study of man, --of man in his unity so marvellously complex, as he is related to the universe around him, to his fellow-men, and to God"--Preface
Lectures on moral science : delivered before the Lowell Institute, Boston by Mark Hopkins( )

25 editions published between 1862 and 2017 in English and Undetermined and held by 468 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Philosophy investigates causes, unities, and ends. Of these it is the last two that are chiefly considered in the following lectures. "Happy," it has been said, "is he who knows the causes of things." But in a world where there are so many apparent discrepancies both natural and moral, he must be more happy who knows the arrangement of things into systems, and sees how all these systems go to make up one greater system and to promote a common end. An investigation of causes respects the past; of unities and ends, the present and the future. Of these the latter are more intimate to us, and he who can trace the principle of unity by which nature is harmonized with herself, and man with nature, and man with himself, and the individual with society, and man with God--who can see in all these a complex unity and can apprehend their end--will have an element of satisfaction far greater than he who should know the causes of all things without being able to unravel their perplexities. From the place assigned to Moral Philosophy in the classification adopted in these lectures, an incidental consideration of the above harmonies seemed to be required. Hence it is hoped that the book may contain suggestions that will be valuable to some who may not agree with its doctrines on the particular subject of morals. It is particularly hoped that it may do something towards introducing more of unity into the courses of study, or some of them, in our higher seminaries. If the works of God, regarded as an expression of his thought, are built up after a certain method, it deserves to be considered whether that thought will not be best reached by following in their study the order that has been followed in their construction, and which is involved in that method. Something of this I have long aimed to do in my instructions, and with very perceptible advantage. With suitable text-books and a right arrangement of studies, much more might doubtless be done. In treating of any natural system, as each part implies all the others, wherever we begin, and whatever method we follow, we are compelled to use terms whose full meaning can be reached only in the progress of the investigation. This is particularly true when, as in the present instance, instead of beginning with definitions, we seek for them. For this it is hoped that due allowance may be made. It will be seen that important, and even cardinal points, are often but briefly touched in these discussions. I can only say that the work is, of necessity, suggestive rather than exhaustive, and that if these points are so treated as to show their place in the system, the outline may be readily filled up"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
An outline study of man; or, The body and mind in one system by Mark Hopkins( )

26 editions published between 1885 and 2012 in English and held by 407 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The substance of the lectures was preserved in a phonographic report. This, it was found, would be of so much aid in writing them out that the form of lectures and the phraseology appropriate to them have been retained, though the references to the board were so many and of such a character that a recast of many portions has been found necessary. As read, the lectures would scarcely convey a correct impression of the extent to which the board was used. The method of teaching an abstract subject other than Mathematics through the eye has long been practiced in Logic, but until recently has been chiefly confined to that. So far as I know, the first to apply it generally and with success was my friend Mr. Dickinson of the Westfield Normal School. This is not object-teaching. That consists in showing the object itself, but this is the teaching of relations, which are invisible, by means of things that are visible. This facilitates the holding of abstract subjects steadily before the mind, and I cannot but hope a good deal from it in the way of popularizing studies of this kind. I shall be content if this work shall awaken in the community a wider interest in the study of man,--of man in his unity so marvellously complex, as he is related to the universe around him, to his fellow-men, and to God"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Miscellaneous essays and discourses by Mark Hopkins( Book )

16 editions published between 1847 and 2012 in English and held by 403 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The law of love and love as a law; or, Christian ethics by Mark Hopkins( Book )

30 editions published between 1870 and 2012 in English and held by 340 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The law of love, and love as a law, or, Moral science, theoretical and practical by Mark Hopkins( Book )

11 editions published between 1869 and 1971 in English and held by 273 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Scriptural idea of man; six lectures given before the theological students at Princeton on the L.P. Stone Foundation by Mark Hopkins( Book )

19 editions published between 1883 and 2012 in English and held by 255 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lectures on moral science by Mark Hopkins( Book )

18 editions published between 1811 and 2012 in English and held by 224 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Philosophy investigates causes, unities, and ends. Of these it is the last two that are chiefly considered in the following lectures. "Happy," it has been said, "is he who knows the causes of things." But in a world where there are so many apparent discrepancies both natural and moral, he must be more happy who knows the arrangement of things into systems, and sees how all these systems go to make up one greater system and to promote a common end. An investigation of causes respects the past; of unities and ends, the present and the future. Of these the latter are more intimate to us, and he who can trace the principle of unity by which nature is harmonized with herself, and man with nature, and man with himself, and the individual with society, and man with God--who can see in all these a complex unity and can apprehend their end--will have an element of satisfaction far greater than he who should know the causes of all things without being able to unravel their perplexities. From the place assigned to Moral Philosophy in the classification adopted in these lectures, an incidental consideration of the above harmonies seemed to be required. Hence it is hoped that the book may contain suggestions that will be valuable to some who may not agree with its doctrines on the particular subject of morals. It is particularly hoped that it may do something towards introducing more of unity into the courses of study, or some of them, in our higher seminaries. If the works of God, regarded as an expression of his thought, are built up after a certain method, it deserves to be considered whether that thought will not be best reached by following in their study the order that has been followed in their construction, and which is involved in that method. Something of this I have long aimed to do in my instructions, and with very perceptible advantage. With suitable text-books and a right arrangement of studies, much more might doubtless be done. In treating of any natural system, as each part implies all the others, wherever we begin, and whatever method we follow, we are compelled to use terms whose full meaning can be reached only in the progress of the investigation. This is particularly true when, as in the present instance, instead of beginning with definitions, we seek for them. For this it is hoped that due allowance may be made. It will be seen that important, and even cardinal points, are often but briefly touched in these discussions. I can only say that the work is, of necessity, suggestive rather than exhaustive, and that if these points are so treated as to show their place in the system, the outline may be readily filled up"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Strength and beauty : discussions for young men by Mark Hopkins( Book )

8 editions published between 1874 and 2015 in English and held by 211 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An address, delivered in South Hadley, Mass., July 30, 1840, at the third anniversary of the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary by Mark Hopkins( )

4 editions published in 1840 in English and held by 197 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A discourse commemorative of Amos Lawrence : delivered by request of the students, in the chapel of Williams College, February 21, 1853 by Mark Hopkins( )

9 editions published between 1853 and 1974 in English and held by 192 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The law of love and love as a law, or, Christian ethics : theory of morals restated : for use with the outline study of man by Mark Hopkins( )

23 editions published between 1881 and 1958 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Teachings and counsels, twenty baccalaureate sermons; with a discourse on President Garfield by Mark Hopkins( Book )

8 editions published in 1884 in English and held by 157 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Address to the people of Massachusetts : on the present condition and claims of the temperance reformation by Mark Hopkins( )

11 editions published in 1846 in English and held by 155 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The central principle : an oration delivered before the New England Society of New York, December 22, 1853 by Mark Hopkins( )

14 editions published between 1854 and 2012 in English and held by 146 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Evidences of Christianity : lectures before the Lowell Institute, January 1844 by Mark Hopkins( Book )

17 editions published between 1863 and 2017 in English and held by 145 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The connexion between taste and morals : two lectures by Mark Hopkins( )

9 editions published between 1841 and 2012 in English and held by 142 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Lectures on the evidences of Christianity : before the Lowell Institute, January, 1844
Covers
Lectures on moral science : delivered before the Lowell Institute, Boston
Alternative Names
Hopkins, Marcus 1802-1887

Hopukinsu, Maku

Mark Hopkins escritor estauxunidense (1802–1887)

Марк Хопкинс

مارك هوبكينز

ホプキンス, マク

宝府禁斯, 麻克

Languages
English (441)

German (3)