WorldCat Identities

Bea, Keith

Overview
Works: 78 works in 153 publications in 1 language and 1,179 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Author
Classifications: JK1108, 363.34
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Keith Bea
Federal disaster policies after terrorists strike : issues and options by Keith Bea( Book )

4 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and held by 108 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Emerging issues in homeland security by William M Thaler( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 71 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Disaster evacuation and displacement policy : issues for Congress by Keith Bea( Book )

8 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 38 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina reaches beyond the borders of the states directly affected by the wind, rain, and floods. Before the storm reached the coast, thousands of residents of Louisiana and Mississippi evacuated to other states, including Texas and Oklahoma. Many people, for a variety of reasons, chose to disregard the mandatory evacuation orders issued by state and local officials. In general, evacuation policy is set and enforced by state and local officials. Federal policy provides for various aspects of civilian evacuation. As Members of Congress explore the challenges and losses in the states affected directly or indirectly by Hurricane Katrina, they may be called upon to consider federal policy options to more fully integrate federal and state authorities
Urban search and rescue task forces facts and issues by Keith Bea( Book )

4 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Since the early 1990s, Urban Search and Rescue Task Forces have been certified, trained, and funded by the federal government. Twenty-eight task forces are located throughout the United States. When the President issues a major disaster declaration, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials may call out the task force (or forces) in closest proximity to the disaster to help locate and extricate victims from collapsed buildings and structures. The task forces represent a partnership involving federal, local government, and private sector experts. Over $100 million in federal funds have been provided in recent years to equip, train, and assist the task forces that are considered to be part of the federal emergency response network. This report provides basic information on the task forces and presents some issues that might be addressed by Congress
Federal Stafford Act disaster assistance : presidential declarations, eligible activities, and funding by Keith Bea( Book )

7 editions published between 2006 and 2008 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (the Stafford Act) authorizes the President to issue major disaster or emergency declarations in response to catastrophes that overwhelm state and local governments. Such declarations result in the distribution of a wide range of federal aid to individuals and families, certain nonprofit organizations, and public agencies. Congress appropriates money to the Disaster Relief Fund (DRF) for disaster assistance authorized by the Stafford Act, which is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Appropriations to the DRF remain available until expended. At the conclusion of the 109th Congress the Senate inserted Stafford Act amendments into the FY2007 DHS appropriations legislation (H.R. 5441, enacted as P.L. 109-295). These amendments, Subtitle E of Title VI (120 Stat. 1444 - 1457), expand FEMA's authority to expedite emergency assistance to stricken areas, impose new planning and preparedness requirements on federal administrators, and increase federal assistance to victims and communities. The amendments, most of which took effect on the date of enactment (October 4, 2006), are summarized in CRS Report RL33729, Federal Emergency Management Policy Changes After Hurricane Katrina: A Summary of Statutory Provisions, coordinated by Keith Bea. Legislation to amend the Stafford Act has received action in the 110th Congress. On July 31, 2008, the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee ordered to be reported H.R. 6658, which would make significant changes in the Stafford Act regarding various issues, including, but not limited to, temporary employees, warning systems, pre-disaster hazard mitigation; the bill also would establish new authorities for existing programs and the funding mechanism. Also, H.R. 2775, reported from the same committee on September 10, 2007, would amend the statute by authorizing the Emergency Management Performance Grant (EMPG) program. Third, the full House approved a bill reauthorizing the Pre-Disaster Mitigation (PDM) program (H.R. 6109). In addition, legislation specific to the administration of Stafford Act provisions in the Gulf Coast (cost-share waivers in H.R. 1591 and cancellation of loan repayment requirements in S. 965) were folded into P.L. 110-28, the U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Act, 2007. This report will be updated as warranted by events or legislative action
The Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) : an overview by Keith Bea( Book )

4 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Alaska emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Alaska's emergency management statute clarifies and strengthens the roles of the governor, state agencies, and local governments in prevention and preparation for response and recovery from a disaster. The statute also addresses the prevention of disasters caused or aggravated by inadequate planning for, and regulation of, public and private facilities and land use. State and local emergency management plans are tied to environmental plans to create a coordinated response to disasters. Other provisions reside in the civil defense statute which expands gubernatorial and emergency powers and mutual aid agreements to respond to an enemy attack
Wyoming emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Alabama emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Florida emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Colorado emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wisconsin emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Maine emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Guam emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Connecticut emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Georgia emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Idaho emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities summarized by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Political status of Puerto Rico background, options, and issues in the 109th Congress by Keith Bea( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico has a unique history as a part of the United States. United States suzerainty over Puerto Rico originated with the acquisition of the islands in 1898 after the conclusion of the Spanish-American War. For decades, the federal government administered government operations in Puerto Rico through military liaisons or civilian officials appointed by the President. Legislation enacted by Congress in 1950 (P.L. 81-600) and in 1952 (P.L. 82-447) granted Puerto Rico authority to establish a republican form of local government through a constitution approved by the citizens of Puerto Rico and the Congress in 1952
Federal Emergency Management and Homeland Security Organization : historical developments and legislative options by Henry B Hogue( Book )

5 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf coasts of Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi on August 29, 2005, resulting in severe and widespread damage to the region. The response of the Federal Government, especially the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in the aftermath of the storm has been widely criticized. Some of the criticism has focused on the organizational arrangements involving FEMA and its parent, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). One month prior to the hurricane, in July 2005, Secretary of Homeland Security, Michael Chertoff, announced plans for a reorganization of DHS, including FEMA. Known as the "Second Stage Review," or "2SR," the reorganization transferred emergency preparedness functions from FEMA to a new Preparedness Directorate, among other changes. The Administration began implementation of the reorganization on October 1, 2005. In response to Administration requests, congressional support for the proposal was provided through approval of the FY2006 appropriations legislation. In the aftermath of the Katrina disaster, administrative structure issues remain a matter of contention. Pending legislation before Congress (H.R. 3656, H.R. 3659, H.R. 3816, H.R. 3685, H.R. 4009, H.R. 4493, S. 1615, S. 2302, H.R. 4840, H.R. 5316, and H.R. 5351) would make further changes. The release of reports by the House, Senate, and White House on the response to Hurricane Katrina may lead to further examination of the issues. This report provides background information on the establishment and evolution of federal emergency management organizational arrangements since the end of World War II, and briefly summarizes the legislative proposals
Minnesota emergency management and homeland security authorities summarized( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Minnesota governor exercises authority over emergency management in the state and may assume direct control over certain emergencies. The executive council provides state assistance and allocates state funding for emergencies. The division of emergency management is located within the department of public safety and coordinates state emergency preparedness activities and the response to natural disasters. Farmers may apply for a disaster recovery loan from the state and its local governments, and may seek grants for floodplain disaster reduction studies. A disaster declaration can last up to 30 days if the cause results from enemy sabotage or a public health emergency, and for a maximum of five days for other peacetime emergencies. Continuity of government provisions allow the governor to move the capital from St. Paul; and interim succession and relocation of local government authorities is also provided. The statute provides for closing banks during a natural disaster. This report is one of a series that profiles emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each profile identifies the more significant elements of state statutes, generally as codified. Congressional readers may wish to conduct further searches for related provisions using the Internet link presented in the last section of this report. The National Conference of State Legislatures provided primary research assistance in the development of these profiles under contract to the Congressional Research Service (CRS). Summary information on all of the profiles is presented in CRS Report RL32287. This report will be updated as developments warrant
 
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Federal disaster policies after terrorists strike : issues and options
Alternative Names
Bea, Keith A. (Keith Alan)

Languages
English (60)

Covers
Emerging issues in homeland security