WorldCat Identities

Calloway, Colin G. (Colin Gordon) 1953-

Overview
Works: 119 works in 436 publications in 1 language and 32,876 library holdings
Genres: History  Sources  Biography  Bibliography  Bibliographies  Juvenile works  Treaties  Captivity narratives 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Colin G Calloway
One vast winter count : the Native American West before Lewis and Clark by Colin G Calloway( Book )

16 editions published between 2003 and 2006 in English and held by 3,320 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This sweeping account traces the histories of the Native peoples of the American West from their arrival thousands of years ago to the early years of the nineteenth century. Colin G. Calloway depicts Indian country west of the Appalachians to the Pacific, with emphasis on conflict and change. Calloway's narrative includes: the first inhabitants and their early pursuit of big-game animals; the diffusion of corn and how it transformed American Indian life; the Spanish invasion and Indian resistance to Spanish colonialism; French-Indian relations in the heart of the continent; the diffusion of horses and horse culture; the collision of rival European empires and the experiences of Indian peoples whose homelands became imperial borderlands; and the dramatic events between the American Revolution and the arrival of Lewis and Clark. The account ends as a new American nation emerged independent of the British Empire, took over the trans-Mississippi West, and began to expand its own empire based on the concept of liberty and the acquisition of Indian land. This book offers a new look at the early history of the region--a blending of ethnohistory, colonial history, and frontier history. It features Native voices and perspectives; a fluid integration of a wide range of oral and archival sources from across the West; a reconstruction of cultural histories; and balanced consideration of controversial subjects and issues. Calloway offers a glimpse at the lives of generations of Native peoples in a western land soon to be overrun
The scratch of a pen : 1763 and the transformation of North America by Colin G Calloway( Book )

18 editions published between 2005 and 2007 in English and held by 3,320 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From the Publisher: In this superb volume in Oxford's acclaimed Pivotal Moments series, Colin Calloway reveals how the Treaty of Paris of 1763 had a profound effect on American history, setting in motion a cascade of unexpected consequences, as Indians and Europeans, settlers and frontiersmen, all struggled to adapt to new boundaries, new alignments, and new relationships. Britain now possessed a vast American empire stretching from Canada to the Florida Keys, yet the crushing costs of maintaining it would push its colonies toward rebellion. White settlers, free to pour into the West, clashed as never before with Indian tribes struggling to defend their way of life. In the Northwest, Pontiac's War brought racial conflict to its bitterest level so far. Whole ethnic groups migrated, sometimes across the continent: it was 1763 that saw many exiled settlers from Acadia in French Canada move again to Louisiana, where they would become Cajuns. Calloway unfurls this panoramic canvas with vibrant narrative skill, peopling his tale with memorable characters such as William Johnson, the Irish baronet who moved between Indian campfires and British barracks; Pontiac, the charismatic Ottawa chieftain; and James Murray, Britains first governor in Quebec, who fought to protect the religious rights of his French Catholic subjects. Most Americans know the significance of the Declaration of Independence or the Emancipation Proclamation, but not the Treaty of Paris. Yet 1763 was a year that shaped our history just as decisively as 1776 or 1862. This captivating book shows why
Dawnland encounters : Indians and Europeans in Northern New England by Colin G Calloway( )

10 editions published between 1990 and 2000 in English and held by 2,198 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
After King Philip's War : presence and persistence in Indian New England by Colin G Calloway( )

10 editions published between 1997 and 2000 in English and held by 2,197 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Introduction : surviving the dark ages / Colin G. Calloway -- Revisiting The redeemed captive : new perspectives on the 1704 attack on Deerfield / Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeney -- The "disappearance" of the Abenaki in western Maine : political organization and ethnocentric assumptions / David L. Ghere -- The first whalemen of Nantucket / Daniel Vickers -- The right to a name : the Narragansett people and Rhode Island officials in the Revolutionary Era / Ruth Wallis Herndon and Ella Wilcox Sekatau -- "Divorced" from the land : resistance and survival of Indian women in eighteenth-century New England / Jean M. O'Brien -- "Once more let us consider" : William Apess in the writing of New England Native American history / Barry O'Connell -- The Massachusetts Indian Enfranchisement Act : ethnic contest in historical context, 1849-1869 / Ann Marie Plane and Gregory Button -- Unseen neighbors : Native Americans of central Massachusetts, a people who had "vanished" / Thomas L. Doughton -- Tribal network and migrant labor : Mi'kmaq Indians as seasonal workers in Aroostook's potato fields, 1870-1980 / Harald E.L. Prins
North Country captives : selected narratives of Indian captivity from Vermont and New Hampshire by Colin G Calloway( )

11 editions published between 1992 and 2001 in English and held by 1,805 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Eight narratives challenge old stereotypes and provide a clearer understanding of the nature of captive taking. These stories portray captors as individuals with a unique culture, offering glimpses of daily life in frontier communities
New worlds for all : Indians, Europeans, and the remaking of early America by Colin G Calloway( Book )

26 editions published between 1997 and 2013 in English and held by 1,729 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In New Worlds for All, Calloway explores the unique & vibrant new cultures that Indians & Europeans forged together in early America. The process, Calloway writes, lasted longer than the United States has existed as a nation. During that time, most of America was still "Indian country," & even in areas of European settlement, Indians and Europeans remained a part of each other's daily lives: living, working, worshiping, traveling, & trading together - as well as fearing, avoiding, despising, & killing one another
The American Revolution in Indian country : crisis and diversity in Native American communities by Colin G Calloway( Book )

24 editions published between 1995 and 2009 in English and held by 1,672 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study presents the first broad coverage of Indian experiences in the American Revolution rather than Indian participation as allies or enemies of contending parties. Colin Calloway focuses on eight Indian communities as he explores how the Revolution often translated into war among Indians and their own struggles for independence. Drawing on British, American, Canadian and Spanish records, Calloway shows how Native Americans pursued different strategies, endured a variety of experiences, but were bequeathed a common legacy as result of the Revolution
New directions in American Indian history by Colin G Calloway( Book )

10 editions published between 1988 and 1992 in English and held by 1,412 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Each year more than five hundred new books appear in the field of North American Indian history. There exists, however, no means by which scholars can easily judge which are most significant, which explore new fields of inquiry and ask new questions, and which areas are the subject of especially strong inquiry or are being overlooked. New Directions in American Indian History provides some answers to these questions by bringing together a collection of bibliographic essays by historians, anthropologists, sociologists, religionists, linguists, economists, and legal scholars who are working at the cutting edge of Indian history. This volume responds to the label "new directions" in two ways. First, it describes what new directions have been pursued recently by historians of the Indian experience. Second, it points out some new directions that remain to be pursued."--Book jacket
The Shawnees and the war for America by Colin G Calloway( Book )

8 editions published between 2007 and 2014 in English and held by 1,313 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An account of early American settler efforts to claim Shawnee territories in Ohio, Kentucky, and other states traces how the Shawnee tribe met American forces on equal terms before being forced to fight in order to salvage its cultural and political independence
The Indian history of an American institution : Native Americans and Dartmouth by Colin G Calloway( )

12 editions published between 2010 and 2013 in English and held by 1,175 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Introduction : a school in the heart of the Indian country -- Eleazar Wheelock and the Indian Charity School, 1743-69 -- Samson Occom and the Indian money, 1765-75 -- Dartmouth, Indians, and the American Revolution, 1775-1800 -- Dartmouth men in Indian country, 1775-1820 -- Dartmouth in the age of Indian removal, 1820-50 -- Students from Indian territory, 1850-85 -- Charles Eastman, 1858-1939 -- Indian symbols and some Indian students, 1900-1969 -- The return of the Natives, 1970-2010 -- Conclusion : Eleazar Wheelock meets Luther Standing Bear
Pen and ink witchcraft : treaties and treaty making in American Indian history by Colin G Calloway( )

15 editions published between 2012 and 2014 in English and held by 1,140 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Indian peoples made some four hundred treaties with the United States between the American Revolution and 1871, when Congress prohibited them. They signed nine treaties with the Confederacy, as well as countless others over the centuries with Spain, France, Britain, Mexico, the Republic of Texas, Canada, and even Russia, not to mention individual colonies and states. In retrospect, the treaties seem like well-ordered steps on the path of dispossession and empire. The reality was far more complicated. In Pen and Ink Witchcraft, eminent Native American historian Colin G. Calloway narrates the history of diplomacy between North American Indians and their imperial adversaries, particularly the United States
The Western Abenakis of Vermont, 1600-1800 : war, migration, and the survival of an Indian people by Colin G Calloway( Book )

11 editions published between 1990 and 1994 in English and held by 1,052 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

First peoples : a documentary survey of American Indian history by Colin G Calloway( Book )

23 editions published between 1999 and 2019 in English and held by 960 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Provides an overview of perspectives of American Indian history through the author's own research of both Native Indians and European colonials along with primary source documents and picture essays. This work is a textbook that features groups of primary source documents at the end of each chapter, essentially providing a reader in addition to the narrative textbook
The Indian world of George Washington : the first President, the first Americans, and the birth of the nation by Colin G Calloway( Book )

9 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 959 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"An authoritative, sweeping, and fresh new biography of the nation's first president, Colin G. Calloway's book reveals fully the dimensions and depths of George Washington's relations with the First Americans."--Provided by publisher
The World turned upside down : Indian voices from early America( Book )

16 editions published between 1994 and 2016 in English and held by 957 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This unique collection presents Native American perspectives on the events of the colonial era, from the first encounters between Indians and Europeans in the early seventeenth century through the American Revolution in the late eighteenth century. The documents collected here are drawn from letters, speeches, and records of treaty negotiations in which Indians addressed settlers. Colin Calloway's introduction discusses the nature of such sources and the problems of interpreting them and also analyzes the forces of change that were creating a "new world" for Native Americans during the colonial period. An overview introduces each chapter, and a headnote to each document comments on its context and significance. Maps, illustrations, a bibliography, and an index are also included
The Abenaki by Colin G Calloway( Book )

8 editions published between 1989 and 2014 in English and held by 831 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Describes the history, culture, and traditions of the Abenaki Indians, one of the tribes living and surviving in northern New England
Indians of the Northeast by Colin G Calloway( Book )

7 editions published between 1991 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 797 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Describes the Native American tribes of the Northeast, the Narraganset, the Abnaki, the Iroquois, and the Nanticoke, and the influence on them of their early contact with Europeans
The victory with no name : the Native American defeat of the first American army by Colin G Calloway( Book )

12 editions published between 2014 and 2016 in English and held by 794 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In 1791, General Arthur St. Clair led the United States Army in a campaign to destroy a complex of Indian villages at the Miami River in northwestern Ohio. Almost within reach of their objective, St. Clair's 1,400 men were attacked by about one thousand Indians. The U.S. force was decimated, suffering nearly one thousand casualties in killed and wounded, while Indian casualties numbered only a few dozen. But despite the lopsided result, it wouldn't appear to carry much significance; it involved only a few thousand people, lasted less than three hours, and the outcome, which was never in doubt, was permanently reversed a mere three years later. Neither an epic struggle nor a clash that changed the course of history, the battle doesn't even have a name. Yet, as renowned Native American historian Colin Calloway demonstrates here, St. Clair's Defeat--as it came to be known--was hugely important for its time. It was both the biggest victory the Native Americans ever won, and, proportionately, the biggest military disaster the United States had suffered. With the British in Canada waiting in the wings for the American experiment in republicanism to fail, and some regions of the West gravitating toward alliance with Spain, the defeat threatened the very existence of the infant United States. Generating a deluge of reports, correspondence, opinions, and debates in the press, it produced the first congressional investigation in American history, while ultimately changing not only the manner in which Americans viewed, raised, organized, and paid for their armies, but the very ways in which they fought their wars. Emphasizing the extent to which the battle has been overlooked in history, Calloway illustrates how this moment of great victory by American Indians became an aberration in the national story and a blank spot in the national memory. Calloway shows that St. Clair's army proved no match for the highly motivated and well-led Native American force that shattered not only the American Army but the ill-founded assumption that Indians stood no chance against European methods and models of warfare. An engaging and enlightening read for American history enthusiasts and scholars alike, The Victory with No Name brings this significant moment in American history back to light"--
White people, Indians, and Highlanders : tribal peoples and colonial encounters in Scotland and America by Colin G Calloway( )

18 editions published between 2008 and 2010 in English and held by 784 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this imaginative work of imperial and tribal history, Colin Calloway examines why these two seemingly wildly disparate groups appear to have so much in common. Both Highland clans and Native American societies underwent parallel experiences on the peripheries of Britain's empire, and often encountered one another on the frontier. Indeed, Highlanders and American Indians fought, traded, and lived together. Both groups were treated as tribal peoples -- remnants of a barbaric past--and eventually forced from their ancestral lands as their traditional food sources--cattle in the Highlands and bison on the Great Plains -- were decimated to make way for livestock farming. In a familiar pattern, the cultures that conquered them would later romanticize the very ways of life they had destroyed. White People, Indians, and Highlanders illustrates how these groups alternately resisted and accommodated the cultural and economic assault of colonialism, before their eventual dispossession during the Highland Clearances and Indian Removals. What emerges is a finely-drawn portrait of how indigenous peoples with their own rich identities experienced cultural change, economic transformation, and demographic dislocation amidst the growing power of the British and American empires. -- Publisher description
Our hearts fell to the ground : Plains Indian views of how the West was lost by Colin G Calloway( Book )

6 editions published between 1996 and 2018 in English and held by 775 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This anthology chronicles the Plains Indians' struggle to maintain their traditional way of life in the changing world of the nineteenth century. Its rich variety of 34 primary sources -- including narratives, myths, speeches, and transcribed oral histories -- gives students the rare opportunity to view the transformation of the West from Native American perspective. Calloway's introduction offers information on western expansion, territorial struggles among Indian tribes, the slaughter of the buffalo, and forced assimilation through the reservation system. More than 30 pieces of Plains Indian art are included, along with maps, headnotes, questions for consideration, a bibliography, a chronology, and an index
 
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One vast winter count : the Native American West before Lewis and Clark
Covers
The scratch of a pen : 1763 and the transformation of North AmericaAfter King Philip's War : presence and persistence in Indian New EnglandNorth Country captives : selected narratives of Indian captivity from Vermont and New HampshireNew worlds for all : Indians, Europeans, and the remaking of early AmericaThe American Revolution in Indian country : crisis and diversity in Native American communitiesNew directions in American Indian historyThe Shawnees and the war for AmericaThe Indian history of an American institution : Native Americans and Dartmouth
Alternative Names
Calloway, Colin

Calloway, Colin G.

Calloway, Colin Gordon.

Calloway, Colin Gordon 1953-

Colin Calloway

Colin Calloway historien américain

Colin G. Calloway Amerikaans historicus

Colin G. Calloway historiador estadounidense

Gordon Calloway, Colin 1953-

Languages
English (269)