WorldCat Identities

Breslaw, Elaine G. 1932-

Overview
Works: 14 works in 47 publications in 1 language and 4,750 library holdings
Genres: History  Biographies  Sources  Academic theses 
Roles: Author
Classifications: F2230.2.A7, 974.45
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Elaine G Breslaw
Lotions, potions, pills, and magic : health care in early America by Elaine G Breslaw( )

10 editions published between 2012 and 2016 in English and held by 1,994 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the years following the American Revolution, as poverty increased and America's water and air became more polluted, people grew sicker. Traditional medicine became increasingly ineffective. Instead, Americans sought out both older and newer forms of alternative medicine and people who embraced these methods: midwives, folk healers, Native American shamans, African obeahs and the new botanical and water cure advocates. The author describes the evolution of public health crises and solutions, and argues that their ascendance over other healers didn't begin until germ theory finally migrated from Europe, and American medical education achieved professional standing. In addition to being a history of health in early America, it is a history of struggle, as natives and newcomers alike grappled with the obstacles imposed by biology, ecology, and fellow human beings. The author's position, supported by stories and anecdotes, calls for a frank reconsideration of the history of America, its health, and its doctors
Tituba, reluctant witch of Salem : devilish Indians and Puritan fantasies by Elaine G Breslaw( Book )

8 editions published between 1996 and 1997 in English and held by 1,790 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

With this important book, Elaine G. Breslaw has "found" Tituba, the elusive, mysterious, and often mythologized Indian woman accused of witchcraft in Salem in 1692 and immortalized in Arthur Miller's The Crucible. Reconstructing the life of the slave woman at the center of the notorious Salem witch trials, the book traces Tituba from her likely origins in South America to Barbados, forcefully dispelling the commonly held belief that Tituba was African. The uniquely multicultural nature of life on a seventeenth-century Barbadan sugar plantation - defined by a mixture of English, American Indian, and African ways and folklore - indelibly shaped the young Tituba's world and the mental images she brought with her to Massachusetts
Witches of the Atlantic world : a historical reader & primary sourcebook( Book )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 423 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This unique anthology is the first to provide a multicultural perspective on witchcraft from the 15th to 18th century. Featuring primary documents as well as scholarly interpretations, Witches of the Atlantic World builds upon information regarding both Christian and non-Christian beliefs about possession and the demonic. Elaine G. Breslaw draws on Native American, African, South American, and African-American sources, as well as the European and New England heritage, to illuminate the ways in which witchcraft in early America was an attempt to understand and control evil and misfortune in the New World. Organized into sections on folklore and magic, diabolical possession, Christian perspectives, and the question of gender, the volume includes selections by Cotton Mather, Matthew Hopkins, and Samuel Willard, among others; Salem trial testimonies; and commentary by a host of distinguished scholars. Together the materials demonstrate how the Protestant and Catholic traditions shaped American concepts, and how multicultural aspects played a key role in the Salem experience. Witches of the Atlantic World sheds new light on one of the most perplexing aspects of American history and provides important background for the continued scholarly and popular interest in witches and witchcraft today"--Publisher description
Dr. Alexander Hamilton and provincial America : expanding the orbit of Scottish culture by Elaine G Breslaw( Book )

5 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 222 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In this sweeping biography, Elaine G. Breslaw examines the life of Dr. Alexander Hamilton (1712-1756), a highly educated Scottish physician who immigrated to Maryland in 1738. From an elite European family, Hamilton was immediately confronted with the relatively primitive social milieu of the New World. He faced unfamiliar and challenging social institutions: the labor system that relied on black slaves, extraordinarily fluid social statuses, distasteful business methods, unpleasant conversational quirks, as well as variant habits of dress, food, and drink that required accommodation and, when possible, acceptance." "Paradoxically, the more acclimated he became to Maryland ways, the greater his impulse to change that society and make it more satisfying for himself both emotionally and intellectually. Breslaw perceptively describes the ways in which Hamilton tried to transform the society around him, attempting to re-create the world he had left behind and thereby justify his continued residence in such an unsophisticated place." "Hamilton, best known as the author of the Itinerarium - a shrewd and insightful account of his journey through the colonies in 1744 - also founded the Tuesday Club of Annapolis, promoted a local musical culture, and in his letters and essays, provided witty commentary on the American social experience. In addition to practicing medicine, Hamilton participated in local affairs, transporting to Maryland some of the rationalist ideas about politics, religion, and learning that were germinating in Scotland's early Enlightenment. As Breslaw explains, Hamilton's writings tell us that those adopted ideas were given substance and vitality in the New World long before the revolutionary crises." "Throughout her narrative, Breslaw usefully sets Hamilton's life in both Scotland and America against the background of the major political, military, religious, social, and economic events of his time. The largely forgotten story of a fascinating, cosmopolitan, and complex Scotsman, Dr. Alexander Hamilton and Provincial America illuminates our understanding of elites as they navigated their eighteenth-century world."--Jacket
Records of the Tuesday Club of Annapolis, 1745-56( Book )

4 editions published between 1987 and 1988 in English and held by 215 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tituba, Reluctant Witch of Salem : Devilish Indians and Puritan Fantasies by Elaine G Breslaw( )

3 editions published between 1995 and 1996 in English and held by 76 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this important book, Elaine Breslaw claims to have rediscovered Tituba, the elusive, mysterious, and often mythologized Indian woman accused of witchcraft in Salem in 1692 and immortalized in Arthur Miller's The Crucible . Reconstructing the life of the slave woman at the center of the notorious Salem witch trials, the book follows Tituba from her likely origins in South America to Barbados, forcefully dispelling the commonly-held belief that Tituba was African. The uniquely multicultural nature of life on a seventeenth-century Barbadan sugar plantation--defined by a mixture of English, Amer
Dr. Alexander Hamilton and the Enlightenment in Maryland by Elaine G Breslaw( )

6 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic : Health Care in Early America by Elaine G Breslaw( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Health in early America was generally good. The food was plentiful, the air and water were clean, and people tended to enjoy strong constitutions as a result of this environment. Practitioners of traditional forms of health care enjoyed high social status, and the cures they offered--from purging to mere palliatives--carried a powerful authority. Consequently, most American doctors felt little need to keep up with Europe's medical advances relying heavily on their traditional depletion methods. However, in the years following the American Revolution as poverty increased and America's water and air became more polluted, people grew sicker. Traditional medicine became increasingly ineffective. Instead, Americans sought out both older and newer forms of alternative medicine and people who embraced these methods: midwives, folk healers, Native American shamans, African obeahs and the new botanical and water cure advocates.In this overview of health and healing in early America, Elaine G. Breslaw describes the evolution of public health crises and solutions. Breslaw examines "ethnic borrowings" (of both disease and treatment) of early American medicine and the tension between trained doctors and the lay public. While orthodox medicine never fully lost its authority, Lotions, Potions, Pills, and Magic argues that their ascendance over other healers didn't begin until the early twentieth century, as germ theory finally migrated from Europe to the United States and American medical education achieved professional standing
American Indian-African societies in Barbados : the case of Tituba-Tattuba by Elaine G Breslaw( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

An affirmation of Scottish nationalism : the eighteenth-century Easy Club by Elaine G Breslaw( Book )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Tituba's confession : the multicultural dimensions of the 1692 Salem witch-hunt by Elaine G Breslaw( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Popular pundit : Fanny Fern and the emergence of the American newspaper columnist by Elaine G Breslaw( )

2 editions published in 1956 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Doktor Hamilton and the enlightenment in Maryland by Elaine G Breslaw( )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Salem witch of Barbados : in search of Tituba's roots by Elaine G Breslaw( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Tituba, reluctant witch of Salem : devilish Indians and Puritan fantasies
Covers
Witches of the Atlantic world : a historical reader & primary sourcebookDr. Alexander Hamilton and provincial America : expanding the orbit of Scottish culture
Alternative Names
Breslaw, Elaine 1932-

Languages
English (47)