WorldCat Identities

Clark-Lewis, Elizabeth

Overview
Works: 17 works in 39 publications in 1 language and 1,386 library holdings
Genres: History  Nonfiction films  Conference papers and proceedings  Genealogy  Internet videos  Documentary films  Short films  Academic theses  Sources 
Roles: Author, Producer, Editor, Interviewee
Classifications: HD6072.2.U52, 331.4816404609753
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis
Living in, living out : African American domestics in Washington, D.C., 1910-1940 by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis( Book )

5 editions published between 1994 and 2010 in English and held by 559 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This oral history portrays the lives of African American women who migrated from the rural South to work as domestic servants in Washington, D.C., in the early decades of this century. In Living In, Living Out, Elizabeth Clark-Lewis narrates the personal experiences of eighty-one women who worked for wealthy white families. These women describe how they encountered - but never accepted - the master-servant relationship, and recount the strategies they used to change their status from "live in" servants to daily paid workers who "lived out."" "Clark-Lewis describes the women's roots in the rural South, where limited prospects encouraged African American families to plan their daughters' migration to northern cities. While still very young, girls were trained to do household chores; as they got older, "traveling talk" began to prepare them to survive in the world of white employers. After an elaborate search for places to live with northern kin, girls were sent off with familiar folk rituals: they were given charms for good luck, blessings from the church, and fetishes for remembrance." "With candor and passion, the women interviewed tell of adjusting to city life "up North," of being placed as live-in servants, and of the frustrations and indignities they endured as domestics. By networking on the job with laundresses and at churches and penny savers clubs, they found ways to transform the master-servant relationship into an employer-employee relationship. Clark-Lewis points out that their perseverance and courage not only improved their own lot but also transformed work life for succeeding generations of African American women. A series of in-depth vignettes about the later years of these women bears poignant witness to their efforts to carve out lives of fulfillment and dignity."--Jacket
Freedom bags( Visual )

9 editions published between 1990 and 2004 in English and held by 325 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Freedom Bags is the story of African-American women who migrated from the rural south during the first three decades of the 20th century. Hoping to escape from the racism and poverty of the post-Civil War South, they boarded segregated trains for an uncertain future up North. Having had limited education, most could find jobs only as house workers. With spirit and humor, the women remember their tactics for self preservation in the homes of their employers, where they often faced exploitation and sexual harassment. After hours they relished their independence and enjoyed good times with friends and family. Their stories are interwoven with rare footage, still photographs, and period music to create a portrait of the largest internal migration in U.S. history. These were proud women who kept their dignity and sense of worth through difficult times
First freed : Washington, D.C. in the emancipation era( Book )

5 editions published between 1998 and 2002 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Black and Jewish images by Tony Brown( Visual )

2 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 124 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this 1978 episode of Tony Brown's Journal, Tony Brown interviews Alex Haley, James Walker, and Elizabeth Clark Lewis about genealogy
Living in, living out : African American domestics and the great migration by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis( Book )

3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 120 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This oral history portrays the lives of African American women who migrated from the rural South to work as domestic servants in Washington, DC in the early decades of the twentieth century. In Living In, Living Out Elizabeth Clark-Lewis narrates the personal experiences of eighty-one women who worked for wealthy white families. These women describe how they encountered'but never accepted'the master-servant relationship, and recount their struggles to change their status from "live in" servants to daily paid workers who "lived out." With candor and passion, the women interviewed tell of leaving their families and adjusting to city life "up North," of being placed as live-in servants, and of the frustrations and indignities they endured as domestics. By networking on the job, at churches, and at penny savers clubs, they found ways to transform their unending servitude into an employer-employee relationship'gaining a new independence that could only be experienced by living outside of their employers' homes. Clark-Lewis points out that their perseverance and courage not only improved their own lot but also transformed work life for succeeding generations of African American women. A series of in-depth vignettes about the later years of these women bears poignant witness to their efforts to carve out lives of fulfillment and dignity
"This work had a' end" : the transition from live-in to day work by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis( Book )

3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 47 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From servant to dayworker : a study of selected household service workers in Washington, D.C., 1900-1926 by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis( )

2 editions published between 1983 and 1988 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Emerging voices and paradigms : Black women's scholarship( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Doing their part: the WAVES in World War II" by Regina T Akers( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Synergy : public history at Howard University( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Living in, living out : African American domestics in Washington, D.C., 1910-1940 by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"This oral history portrays the lives of African American women who migrated from the rural South to work as domestic servants in Washington, D.C., in the early decades of the twentieth century. In Living In, Living Out, Elizabeth Clark-Lewis narrates the personal experiences of eighty-one women who worked for wealthy white families. These women describe how they encountered - but never accepted - the master-servant relationship, and recount the strategies they used to change their status from "live in" servants to daily paid workers who "lived out"--P. [4] of cover
"This Work Had A' End."the Transition from Live-in to Day Work. Southern Women: The Intersection of Race, Class and Gender. Working Paper 2 by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis( Book )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Experiences of black women, who migrated from the rural south to the District of Columbia between 1900 and 1926, are examined in order to illustrate the nature of household work during this period. While previous research on black private household workers usually attributed changes in household labor to architectural and technological trends, this data indicated that the transition from live-in servant to day worker occurred as a result of the women's desire for less restrictive employment. Oral histories of 23 black women, who made this transition, challenge the belief that household workers lacked the initiative and ability to control employment conditions. Southern relatives' roles, the Washington community, churches, and pre-migration experiences are examined, along with the consequences of the transition in relation to the women's self-esteem. Results indicate that the family, with its inherent roles and values, remained crucial to these women despite differences between their rural upbringing and urban employment. (Author/JHP)
This work had a end : African-American domestic workers in Washington, DC 1910-1940 by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Between women : domestics and their employers by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis( )

1 edition published in 1988 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Living In : African American Domestics in Washington, D.C., 1910-1940 by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Oral History : Its utilization in the genealogical research process by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Living in, living out : African American domestics in Washington, D.C., 1910-1940 by Elizabeth Clark-Lewis( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Living in, living out : African American domestics in Washington, D.C., 1910-1940 Living in, living out : African American domestics in Washington, D.C., 1910-1940
Covers
First freed : Washington, D.C. in the emancipation eraLiving in, living out : African American domestics and the great migrationLiving in, living out : African American domestics in Washington, D.C., 1910-1940Living in, living out : African American domestics in Washington, D.C., 1910-1940
Alternative Names
Lewis, Elizabeth Clark-

Languages
English (38)