WorldCat Identities
Fri Mar 21 17:04:02 2014 UTClccn-n871138740.00A Practical Course in Botany, with especial reference to its bearing on agriculture, economics, and sanitation ... With editorial revision by Francis E. Lloyd0.631.00Seven great battles of the Army of Northern Virginia : a program of study and entertainment arranged for the J.E.B. Stuart Chapter of Children of the Confederacy (Auxiliary to the Sophie Bibb Chapter U.D.C.) Montgomery, Alabama /116874335Eliza_Frances_Andrewsn 871138741903858Andrews, E. F. (Eliza Frances), 1840-Andrews, E. F. (Eliza Frances), b. 1840Andrews, Eliza Frances, b. 1840Andrews, Fanny, 1840-Andrews Fanny 1840-1931Andrews, Fanny, b. 1840Hay Elzey 1840-1931containsVIAFID/287866596Hay, Elzey, 1840-1939lccn-n99042744Rushing, S. Kittrelledtlccn-n87113875Lloyd, Francis Ernest1868-1947edtlccn-no96056901University of North Carolina at Chapel HillDocumenting the American South (Project)lccn-n80120860University of North Carolina at Chapel HillLibrarylccn-n82085860Confederate States of AmericaArmy of Northern Virginianc-children of the confederacy$alabama divisionChildren of the ConfederacyAlabama Divisionlccn-no2002055633Alexander Street Presslccn-n84016874Andrews, Garnett1798-1873lccn-n88274031Bragg, Braxton1817-1876lccn-n80044891Lee, Robert E.(Robert Edward)1807-1870Andrews, Eliza Frances1840-HistoryPersonal narratives‡vConfederateDiariesBiographyPersonal narrativesFictionDomestic fictionMilitary historySourcesUnited StatesAmerican Civil War (1861-1865)Manners and customsGeorgiaUnited States--Confederate States of AmericaAndrews, Eliza Frances,Georgia--Wilkes CountyWomenSocial historyUpper class--Social life and customsReconstruction (United States : 1865-1877)BotanyUpper classGirlsSouthern StatesPoor womenConfederate States of America.--Army of Northern VirginiaVirginiaMilitary campaignsUnited States, EastLee, Robert E.--(Robert Edward),Andrews, Garnett,Love-lettersWest VirginiaTennessee--ChattanoogaTennessee--KnoxvilleNational flowersLecturersJournalistsBragg, Braxton,Georgia--WashingtonForrest, Nathan Bedford,Longstreet, James,Courts-martial and courts of inquiryStephens, Alexander H.--(Alexander Hamilton),American fiction--Women authorsAutographsTravelStudy skillsMississippi--Yazoo CitySlaverySherman's March to the Sea (1864)McLaws, Lafayette,EducatorsToombs, Robert Augustus,Estates (Law)Bible.--RevelationD. Appleton and CompanyAfrican AmericansGray, Asa,184019311876187918821895190319041906190819091911191819251954196019681970197619971999200020022004200520062009201020112013201418752592BF292.W774627ocn001614771book19080.53Andrews, Eliza FrancesThe war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865HistoryBiographyDiariesPersonal narrativesPersonal narratives ConfederateSourcesEliza Frances Andrews was born to a prominent judge and planter in Washington, Georgia in 1840. According to one report, her family owned two hundred slaves. She attended the Ladies' Seminary and then enrolled at La Grange Female College, from which she received her A. B. in 1857. Leading up to and during the Civil War Andrews's parents supported the Union, but Eliza supported the Confederacy and her three brothers who fought for the South. At the end of the War, her article, "A Romance of Robbery," appeared in the New York World. The article fictionalized the mistreatment of family friends by Reconstruction officials. This article launched her long career as an author; her writings include articles, novels, and textbooks, some of which appeared under the pseudonym Elzey Hay. After the death of her parents, Eliza was forced to earn more money, which led her to secretly take on the task of editing the local paper, the Washington Gazette. After a short time, however, the publisher discovered his new editor was a woman and declared newspaper work inappropriate for a female. In 1873 Andrews became a school principal in Yazoo, Mississippi, and in 1874 she returned to Washington, Georgia to teach. In 1896 she began teaching literature and French at Wesleyan Female College in Macon, Georgia, and continued there until 1896. It was not until 1908, more than forty years after the Civil War, that she published her diary, The War-Time Journal of a Georgia Girl. She edited this journal significantly before publishing it-omitting personal sections and passages she found embarrassing. She was a strong supporter of slavery during the Civil War, but by the time she published the Journal she was ambivalent. She was a self-proclaimed socialist and espoused Social Darwinism, and actively supported segregation of African Americans and whites. She returned to teach botany at Washington's public high school and wrote two botany textbooks. While her primary means of financial support was teaching, during her lifetime she had an international reputation as both a botanist and writer. She died in 1931. The Journal begins in December 1864, with General Sherman's Union troops camped around Atlanta. The first entry records Andrews's safe arrival in Macon en route to meet relatives with whom she would stay in Southwest Georgia until the War ended.+-+K6840785351536ocn001841680book19110.84Andrews, Eliza FrancesA practical course in botany : with especial reference to its bearings on agriculture, economics, and sanitation1348ocn002677761book19030.88Andrews, Eliza FrancesBotany all the year round : a practical text-book for schools863ocn059359994book20050.63Andrews, Eliza FrancesA family secretHistoryFictionDomestic fiction+-+3489887206838ocn009538734book18820.93Andrews, Eliza FrancesPrince Hall ; or, The romance of a rich young man411ocn038963504com19970.84Andrews, Eliza FrancesThe war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865HistoryBiographyDiariesPersonal narrativesPersonal narratives Confederate51ocn002945133book19061.00Andrews, Eliza FrancesSeven great battles of the Army of Northern Virginia : a program of study and entertainment arranged for the J.E.B. Stuart Chapter of Children of the Confederacy (Auxiliary to the Sophie Bibb Chapter U.D.C.) Montgomery, AlabamaHistoryMilitary history54ocn228679601book18760.81Andrews, Eliza FrancesA family secret : A novel44ocn837068642book18790.81Andrews, Eliza FrancesA mere adventurer : a novel31ocn051832011book19111.00Andrews, Eliza FrancesA practical course in botany : with especial reference to its bearings on agriculture, economics, and sanitition22ocn848907441book18820.47Andrews, Eliza FrancesPrince Hal22ocn846517421book1911Andrews, Eliza FrancesA Practical Course in Botany, with especial reference to its bearing on agriculture, economics, and sanitation ... With editorial revision by Francis E. Lloyd11ocn058886602book1918Andrews, Eliza FrancesA botanist's suggestion for a national flower11ocn070813259book19250.47Andrews, Eliza FrancesTyped letter signed Eliza Frances Andrews to: Dear Mr. Fullerton11ocn645234066com1.00Andrews, Eliza FrancesA practical course in botany, with especial reference to its bearings on agriculture, economics, and sanitation, by E.F. Andrews ... with editorial revision by Francis E. Lloydhttp://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.3901500536409911ocn122330884mixAndrews, Eliza FrancesPapersHistoryThe majority of this collection pertains to Andrews' efforts to publish her journal, "The War-Time Journal of a Georgia Girl." Included is correspondence with D. Appleton and Company and galley-proofs of the journal11ocn670159932book19540.47Byng, JohnThe torrington diaries : a selection from the tours of the hon. john byng [later fifth viscount torrington] between the years 1781-179411ocn470360210book20020.66Andrews, Eliza FrancesJournal of a Georgia woman, 1870-1872HistoryBiographyDiariesIt is remarkable for the light it sheds on the social and economic transformations of the Reconstruction era, particularly as they were perceived and experienced by a southern woman."--BOOK JACKET+-+762688720611ocn230824836book18951.00Andrews, Eliza FrancesA colonial Christmas in the red hills of Georgia3283ocn047741782book20020.66Andrews, Eliza FrancesJournal of a Georgia woman, 1870-1872HistoryBiographyDiariesIt is remarkable for the light it sheds on the social and economic transformations of the Reconstruction era, particularly as they were perceived and experienced by a southern woman."--BOOK JACKET+-+76268872062689ocn037141208book19080.53Andrews, Eliza FrancesThe war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865HistoryBiographyDiariesPersonal narrativesPersonal narratives ConfederateSourcesEliza Frances Andrews was born to a prominent judge and planter in Washington, Georgia in 1840. According to one report, her family owned two hundred slaves. She attended the Ladies' Seminary and then enrolled at La Grange Female College, from which she received her A. B. in 1857. Leading up to and during the Civil War Andrews's parents supported the Union, but Eliza supported the Confederacy and her three brothers who fought for the South. At the end of the War, her article, "A Romance of Robbery," appeared in the New York World. The article fictionalized the mistreatment of family friends by Reconstruction officials. This article launched her long career as an author; her writings include articles, novels, and textbooks, some of which appeared under the pseudonym Elzey Hay. After the death of her parents, Eliza was forced to earn more money, which led her to secretly take on the task of editing the local paper, the Washington Gazette. After a short time, however, the publisher discovered his new editor was a woman and declared newspaper work inappropriate for a female. In 1873 Andrews became a school principal in Yazoo, Mississippi, and in 1874 she returned to Washington, Georgia to teach. In 1896 she began teaching literature and French at Wesleyan Female College in Macon, Georgia, and continued there until 1896. It was not until 1908, more than forty years after the Civil War, that she published her diary, The War-Time Journal of a Georgia Girl. She edited this journal significantly before publishing it-omitting personal sections and passages she found embarrassing. She was a strong supporter of slavery during the Civil War, but by the time she published the Journal she was ambivalent. She was a self-proclaimed socialist and espoused Social Darwinism, and actively supported segregation of African Americans and whites. She returned to teach botany at Washington's public high school and wrote two botany textbooks. While her primary means of financial support was teaching, during her lifetime she had an international reputation as both a botanist and writer. She died in 1931. The Journal begins in December 1864, with General Sherman's Union troops camped around Atlanta. The first entry records Andrews's safe arrival in Macon en route to meet relatives with whom she would stay in Southwest Georgia until the War ended.+-+K68407853531ocn010785017book19080.47Andrews, Eliza FrancesExtracts from the wartime journal of a Georgia girlHistoryPersonal narratives ConfederateSources11ocn407068105com20091.00Bruch, Tamara ElaineThe evolution of the South Eliza Frances Andrews, General William T. Sherman, and green interpretations of the Civil WarHistoryDiariesThis essay examines representations of nature in the journal written by Eliza Frances Andrews during the last year of the Civil War. Andrews utilizes an evolutionary metaphor to justify the Old South, explain the Civil War, and create a New South that maintains many of the Southern values. General Sherman also utilizes nature in order to put an end to the war with his legendary "March to the Sea." The fact that representatives of both the North and the South utilize ecologies for oppositional goals illustrates the vulnerability of nature to be manipulated for political purposes11ocn024864412mix1.00Andrews, GarnettGarnett Andrews papersHistoryAutographsGenealogyVaried papers of Andrews, of Washington, Ga., Yazoo, Miss., and Chattanooga, Tenn., consisting of letters to him from Rosalie Beirne of Monroe County, W. Va., before and after their marriage in 1867; estate papers of Rosalie's father, Andrew Beirne of Monroe County; papers pertaining to the courts martial of Confederate generals Lafayette McLaws and Jerome Bonapart Robertson for actions during the Knoxville campaign (Andrews was a Confederate judge advocate); genealogical charts, correspondence, and other items relating primarily to the Andrews family, but also including material on the Beirne, Garnett, and Key families; and letters from, scrapbook of, and collection of autograph letters from famous persons to Andrews's sister, Eliza Frances Andrews of Georgia, author and illustrator under the name "Elzey Hay." Persons represented in the autograph collection include Braxton Bragg, Henry Clay, Nathan Bedford Forrest, Asa Gray, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, Raphael Semmes, Alexander H. Stephens, and Robert Toombs11ocn317885851mix1.00Andrews familyAndrews family photographsPhotographsThe collection consists of photographs of various Andrews and allied family members. The Andrews lived in Wilkes County, Georgia11ocn048556910art1999Andrews, Eliza Frances11ocn137336001art19090.10Herringshaw, Thomas WilliamAndrews, Eliza Frances+-+3489887206+-+3489887206Fri Mar 21 15:56:43 EDT 2014batch22863