WorldCat Identities

Mississippi State University Department of Forestry

Overview
Works: 34 works in 44 publications in 1 language and 213 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Academic theses  Abstracts  Periodicals 
Classifications: SD144.A15, 634.95
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Mississippi State University
 
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Most widely held works by Mississippi State University
Proceedings of the 13th Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference : Memphis, Tennessee, February 28-March 4, 2005 by Southern Silvicultural Research Conference( Book )

3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Proceedings of the 12th Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference : Biloxi, Mississippi, February 24-28, 2003 by Biennial southern silvicultural research conference( Book )

3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Second Workshop on Seedling Physiology and Growth Problems in Oak Planting, Mississippi State University, February 8-9, 1983 (abstracts) by Workshop on Seedling Physiology and Growth Problems in Oak Planting( Book )

3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Proceedings : a Symposium on Flowering and Seed Development in Trees by Flowering and seed development in trees( Book )

4 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A World of forestry : proceedings of the 25th annual Southern Forest Economics Workshop, New Orleans, LA, April 17-19, 1995 by Southern Forest Economics Workshop( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Proceedings of the 1987 Southern Forest Biomass Workshop : ninth annual meeting of the Southern Forest Biomass Working Group : Biloxi, Mississippi, Royal d' Iberville Hotel, June 8-11, 1987 by Southern Forest Biomass Workshop( Book )

2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Proceedings of the fifteenth Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference, June 19-21, 1979, Mississippi State University by Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Abstracts [of the] 15th Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference, June 19-21, 1979, Mississippi State University by Southern Forest Tree Improvement Conference( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Southern Forest Tree Improvement : 15th Conference : Papers( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Professional paper( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Forestry economics as problem solving by William A Duerr( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A benefit-cost approach to developing a methodology for reforesting critical lands in Java by Endang Suarna( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mississippi timber price report( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Effectiveness of streamside management zones in protecting aquatic habitat in timber management areas by Stephen Hanley Schoenholtz( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Characterization of bottomland hardwood forests managed for desired forest conditions by Trent Danley( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Desired forest conditions, or DFCs, are recently created parameters which strive to create diverse stands of hardwoods of various species and age classes, along with varying densities and canopy gaps, through the use of uneven-aged silvicultural methods and repeated stand entries. Little research has been conducted to examine residual stand composition and hardwood regeneration after DFC installment. The objectives of this study were to characterize forest overstory and midstory conditions after DFC treatments, assess the natural regeneration, and to characterize available light in the treatment and control areas. Residual stand conditions after application of DFC harvest guidelines indicate that shade tolerant species will be the future occupants of the sites and oaks will diminish or disappear over time. This documented initial forest response to DFC treatments can be used by forest and wildlife habitat managers when assessing the potential outcomes of DFC management
Relationships of hydrological and soil conditions to red oak acorn yield in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley and Mississippi Interior Flatwoods Regions by Jonathan E Sloan( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Red oak (Quercus spp.) acorns provide food for wildlife and are propagules for regeneration of these trees. Annual yield of acorns varies temporally and site-specifically. I examined acorn yield in relation to hydrology and soils of hardwood bottomlands at five sites in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and a site in the Mississippi Interior Flatwoods Region during fall-winter 2012-2013. Acorn yield varied among sites (mean = 44.9 acorns/m2; SE = 6.7; CV = 14.9%). Duration of flooding during the growing season differed among sites which influenced soil characteristics. Acorn yield varied inversely with number of days sites were inundated during the growing season (R² = 0.6725; P = 0.0456; n = 6) during 2012-2013. Managers should consider alleviating growing season flooding of red oaks, which may increase acorn yield and sustain red oaks and other bottomland hardwoods
Early survival and growth performance of two oak species and three planting stocks on Hurricane Katrina disturbed lands by John Alec Conrad( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Survival and growth of two oak species, live oak (Quercus virginiana) and Nuttall oak (Quercus texana), and three planting stocks: 1-0 bareroot, conventional containerized, and Root Production Method (RPM™) seedlings were compared. Conventional containerized live oak and bareroot Nuttall oak seedlings exhibited greatest survival. RPM™ seedlings exhibited the lowest survival in both species. Conventional containerized seedlings exhibited greater groundline diameter (GLD) growth and twice as much height growth as bareroot seedlings during the first year. During the second year, conventional containerized seedlings exhibited greater GLD growth than bareroot seedlings in live oak, but in Nuttall oak, bareroot seedlings exhibited greater GLD growth. RPM™ seedlings exhibited similar GLD growth compared to bareroot seedlings during both years but the least height growth of all planting stocks, regardless of species. Height growth of bareroot and conventional containerized seedlings was similar after two years
Measuring tree growth by modeling multi-temporal LiDAR by Michael S Frew( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Crown volume is defined as the geometric space occupied by the crown. Crown volume and the change (growth) of crown volume over time can be an important part of multi-temporal forest analyses but is expensive and time consuming to obtain through conventional forest survey methods for large, remote areas. LiDAR-derived crown volume growth was compared to an expected amount of crown volume growth for 220 Douglas-fir trees in the Panther Creek, Oregon watershed. A paired t-test between expected crown volume growth and the LiDAR-derived crown volume growth resulted in a p-value of 0.85. Regression procedures between expected crown volume and LiDAR-derived crown volume in 2008 and 2012 resulted in R2 values of 0.45 and 0.53, respectively. LiDAR measured change in crown volume over time was not significantly different than the expected amount of change. With further research, multi-temporal LiDAR could become a viable tool for forest analyses
Seasonal effects of first commercial thinning on Ips activity in north Mississippi loblolly pine stands by James Floyd( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In comparison to the southern pine beetle (SPB), (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann), less is known about the three species of Ips bark beetles; the six-spined engraver, Ips calligraphus (Germar); the eastern five-spined engraver, Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff); and the small southern pine engraver, Ips avulses (Eichhoff). Ips commonly enter a stand following the first commercial thinning, feeding on slash and stressed individuals. However, the factors that influence Ips severity are poorly understood. Therefore, this project was designed to study the seasonal effects of first commercial thinning operations on Ips activity in north Mississippi loblolly pine stands.Treatments represented the most commonly used thinning practices in this area (i.e., a fifth row harvest with select, a third row harvest with select, and control). Treatments were duplicated three times per site and two sites were utilized to compare Ips movement to harvesting season
Economic impacts of USDA Forest Service activities for Mississippi's National Forests and Research Units by Katherine McGriff Brown( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Economic impact studies have been conducted on natural resource-related activities throughout the United States. However, a comprehensive analysis of impacts of USDA Forest Service activities has never been conducted in Mississippi. This study provided the needed analysis of economic impacts of National Forests and Research Units in Mississippi. The Impact Analysis for Planning (IMPLAN) software and data were used to create a state economy model and the state economic data were analyzed for the fiscal year 2011. With US (dollar)1 17,864,243 in direct expenditures and revenues generated in the state, for the items considered, by the USDA Forest Service, the total economic impact was US (dollar)2 22,340,891 in 2011 dollars. This supported 2,962 full- and part-time jobs, and resulted in a Social Accounting Matrix (SAM) total output multiplier of 1.89. This information showed the value of the National Forests to the state's economy, along with contributions from the state-based Research Units
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityMississippi State University

Mississippi State University. College of Forest Resources. Department of Forestry

Mississippi State University. Dept. of Forestry

Languages
English (40)