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Mississippi State University Department of Mechanical Engineering

Overview
Works: 51 works in 54 publications in 1 language and 55 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses  Handbooks and manuals 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Mississippi State University
Investigating nondestructive evaluation of carbon fiber reinforced polymer beams using embedded Terfenol-D particle sensors by Jonathan D Rudd( )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reinforced fiber polymer composites are a class of materials that are composed of multiple constituents that work together to create a material specific for applications. By combining different fibers and matricies, laminates can be created that meet demands for high specific stiffness, damping specifications, and electrical resistance. However, their internal complexity subjects them to a number of internal failure modes that have the potential to fail the laminate. Those failure mechanisms are fiber breaking, microcracking in the matrix, debonding of the fibers from matrix, and delamination of ply layers. To assess these failures, nondestructive evaluation methods have been developed to detect internal damage before catastrophic failure occurs. This dissertation investigates an in-situ magnetostrictive based nondestructive method for monitoring delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates by using embedded Terfenol-D particles. The objective is to characterize how laminate ply count and delamination presence affect sensing through the mechanical and magnetic parameters that influence the induced voltage or sensing signal. In addition, the effect of magnetostriction on the formation and propagation of cracks on the sensor boundaries are also investigated. Methods used to characterize this behavior involve experimental testing, analytical, and numerical modeling. From the results, a threedimensional finite element analysis model reveals how the sensor interacts mechanically with the host structure through lower stresses in the delaminated region due to the absence of adhesive forces. The stress variation results in a local magnetic permeability change which influences the induced voltage. The experimental nondestructive testing show that the key parameter influencing the sensing signal for this setup was the particle density, which is controlled by fabrication process. An attempt to analytically model the experimental sensing signal with a first order differential equation using a multi-step process was successful, but there is poor correlation with the experimental results. Finally, analytical mechanics are developed to evaluate the interlaminar failure under a magnetostrictive stress of 55MPa, and was found to not cause interlaminar failure or delamination propagation in Section-A
Laboratory manual for ME 1021 experimental orientation by D. M Eastland( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Towards modeling the anisotropic behavior of polycrystalline materials due to texture using a second order structure tensor by Brandon Chandler Templin( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A material model capable of reproducing the anisotropic behavior of polycrystalline materials will prove to be useful in simulations in which directional properties are of key importance. The primary contributor to anisotropic behavior in polycrystalline materials is the development of texture through the rotation and alignment of slip systems due to plastic deformation. A large concentration of aligned slip systems will influence the glide of dislocations in the respective global deformation direction resulting in a directionally dependent flow stress. The Evolving Microstructural Model of Inelasticity (EMMI) is modified to account for evolving anisotropy due to the development of texture. Texture is characterized via a second order orientation tensor and is incorporated into EMMI through various modifications to the EMMI equations based on physical assumptions. Evolving anisotropy is captured via a static yield surface through a modification to the flow rule based on the assumption loading is entirely elastic within the yield surface. A separate modification to the EMMI equations based on physical assumptions. Evolving anisotropy is captured via a static yield surface through a modification to the flow rule based on the assumption loading is entirely elastic within the yield surface. A separate modification to EMMI captures evolving anisotropy through an apparent yield surface via a modification to the EMMI internal state variable evolution equations. The apparent yield surface is the result of a smaller yield surface translating through stress space and assumes the state of the material is disturbed at stresses much lower than indicated by experimental yield surfaces
An experimental investigation of dual-injection strategies on diesel-methane dual-fuel low temperature combustion in a Single Cylinder Research Engine by Aamir Sohail( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The present manuscript discusses the performance and emission benefits due to two diesel injections in diesel-ignited methane dual fuel Low Temperature Combustion (LTC). A Single Cylinder Research Engine (SCRE) adapted for diesel-ignited methane dual fuelling was operated at 1500 rev/min and 5 bar BMEP with 1.5 bar intake manifold pressure. The first injection was fixed at 310 CAD. A 2nd injection sweep timing was performed to determine the best 2nd injection timing (as 375 CAD) at a fixed Percentage Energy Substitution (PES 75%). The motivation to use a second late injection ATDC was to oxidize Unburnt Hydrocarbons (HC) generated from the dual fuel combustion of first injection. Finally, an injection pressure sweep (550-1300 bar) helped achieve simultaneous reduction of HC (56%) and CO (43%) emissions accompanied with increased IFCE (10%) and combustion efficiency (12%) w.r.t. the baseline single injection (at 310 CAD) of dual fuel LTC
The Doctor of philosophy program in mechanical engineering at Mississippi State University by Mississippi State University( Book )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

An empirically validated multiscale continuum damage model for thermoplastic polymers subjected to variable strain rates by David K Francis( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This dissertation proposes a modified internal state variable (ISV) inelastic damage model that was motivated by experimental structure-property relations of thermoplastics. In particular, a new damage model was developed for glassy, amorphous thermoplastics. ISV evolution equations are defined through thermodynamics, kinematics, and kinetics for isotropic damage arising from two different inclusion types: pores and particles. The damage arising from the particles and crazes is accounted for by three processes: damage nucleation, growth, and coalescence. Damage nucleation is defined as the number density of voids/crazes. The associated ISV rate equation is a function of stress state, molecular weight, fracture toughness, particle size, particle volume fraction, temperature, and strain rate. The damage growth is based upon a single void growing and its growth is defined by an ISV rate equation that is a function of stress state, strain rate sensitivity, and strain rate. The coalescence ISV equation enables interaction between voids and crazes and is a function of the nearest neighbor distance between voids/crazes, size of voids/crazes, temperature, and strain rate. The damage arising from pre-existing voids employs the Cocks-Ashby void growth rule. The total void volume fraction is a summation of the damage arising from particles, pores, and crazes. Micromechanical modeling results for a single void compare well to experimental findings garnered from the literature. This formulation is then implemented into a finite element analysis. For damage evolution, comparisons are made between a one-dimensional material point simulator and a three-dimensional nite element (FE) simulation. Finally, good agreement is found between impact experiments and FE impact simulations using the implemented model
Modeling dendritic solidification using lattice Boltzmann and cellular automaton methods by Mohsen Eshraghi( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This dissertation presents the development of numerical models based on lattice Boltzmann (LB) and cellular automaton (CA) methods for solving phase change and microstructural evolution problems. First, a new variation of the LB method is discussed for solving the heat conduction problem with phase change. In contrast to previous explicit algorithms, the latent heat source term is treated implicitly in the energy equation, avoiding iteration steps and improving the formulation stability and efficiency. The results showed that the model can deal with phase change problems more accurately and efficiently than explicit LB models. Furthermore, a new numerical technique is introduced for simulating dendrite growth in three dimensions. The LB method is used to calculate the transport phenomena and the CA is employed to capture the solid/liquid interface. It is assumed that the dendritic growth is driven by the difference between the local actual and local equilibrium composition of the liquid in the interface. The evolution of a threedimensional (3D) dendrite is discussed. In addition, the effect of undercooling and degree of anisotropy on the kinetics of dendrite growth is studied. Moreover, effect of melt convection on dendritic solidification is investigated using 3D simulations. It is shown that convection can change the kinetics of growth by affecting the solute distribution around the dendrite. The growth features of twodimensional (2D) and 3D dendrites are compared. Furthermore, the change in growth kinetics and morphology of Al-Cu dendrites is studied by altering melt undercooling, alloy composition and inlet flow velocity. The local-type nature of LB and CA methods enables efficient scaling of the model in petaflops supercomputers, allowing the simulation of large domains in 3D. The model capabilities with large scale simulations of dendritic solidification are discussed and the parallel performance of the algorithm is assessed. Excellent strong scaling up to thousands of computing cores is obtained across the nodes of a computer cluster, along with near-perfect weak scaling. Considering the advantages offered by the presented model, it can be used as a new tool for simulating 3D dendritic solidification under convection
Evaluation of performance of combined heat and power systems with dual power generation units (D-CHP) by Alta Alyce Knizley( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this research, a new combined heat and power (CHP) system configuration has been proposed that uses two power generation units (PGU) operating simultaneously with different operational strategies (D-CHP). The performance of the proposed D-CHP system configuration, with one PGU operated at a constant base load and the other operated following the electric load, is quantified in terms of operational cost savings, primary energy consumption (PEC) savings, and carbon dioxide emissions (CDE) savings over a reference case employing a conventional, separate heat and power system. D-CHP system performance is also compared to standard, single PGU operational strategies. The D-CHP system configuration is first examined for four different building configurations simulated using the weather of Chicago, IL. Then, the D-CHP system feasibility study is extended to examine a full-service restaurant benchmark building in nine different U.S. climate zones. Next, the D-CHP configuration is simulated under a second operational strategy, in which one PGU operates base-loaded while the other follows the thermal load, and the two D-CHP strategies are compared. Additionally, the effect of thermal storage on D-CHP system performance is examined. Finally, the D-CHP configuration is extended to a combined cooling, heating, and power configuration (D-CCHP), and the feasibility of this configuration is examined. In addition to D-CHP and D-CCHP systems performance analyses, the parameters of power-to-heat ratio; cost, emissions and primary energy consumption spark spreads; cost and emission ratios; and thermal difference are proposed and examined as performance indicators. It was determined that D-CHP and D-CCHP system strategies can be a viable alternative to traditional CHP system or combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) system operational strategies, in terms of operational cost, PEC, and CDE performance. Generally, the D-CHP and D-CCHP configurations are found to perform comparably to or better than traditional CHP and CCHP configurations
Passive energy management through increased thermal capacitance by Joseph Paul Carpenter( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Energy usage within the world is increasing at a drastic rate. Buildings currently consume a major amount of the total energy used within the United States, and most of this energy usage supports heating and cooling. This demand shows that new passive energy management systems are needed. The use of Increased Thermal Capacitance (ITC) is proposed as a new passive energy management system. To increase thermal capacitance, a piping system is either added into a building's walls or ceiling. In this paper, a building with ITC added is compared to a similar building without ITC using the simulation program TRNSYS. Along with a comparison between the walls and ceiling, several parameters are analyzed for their effect on the performance of the ITC. ITC was found to be effective especially when located in the ceiling, with the location, specific heat and tank size being the most important factors
A petroleum energy, greenhouse gas, and economic life cycle analysis of several automotive fuel options by Matthew Carter Doude( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A vehicle fuel's life does not begin when that fuel is pumped into the tank or the battery is charged. Each kilowatt-hour of fuel that is used has a history traceable back to its original feedstock, be it crude oil, corn, solar energy, or others. In this thesis, a life cycle analysis is performed on E10, E85, B20, hydrogen, and electricity, with the well-to-pump fossil fuel energy use and greenhouse gas emissions compared. Results are presented in the form of either energy or mass per kilowatt of fuel at the plug or at the pump. An analysis of the economic viability of each fuel to the consumer is also demonstrated. E85 is found to have the best well-to-pump fossil fuel energy use at 722 Wh/kWh, while hydrogen demonstrates the best well-to-wheel greenhouse gas emissions with 123 g/km (CO2 equivalent) and electricity produces the lowest vehicle lifetime operating cost of dollars 0 .241/mile
Modified internal state variable models of plasticity using nonlocal integrals in damage and gradients in dislocation density by Fazle Rabbi Ahad( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

To enhance material performance at different length scales, this study strives to develop a reliable analytical and computational tool with the help of internal state variables spanning micro and macro-level behaviors. First, the practical relevance of a nonlocal damage integral added to an internal state variable (BCJ) model is studied to alleviate numerical instabilities associated within the post-bifurcation regime. The characteristic length scale in the nonlocal damage, which is mathematical in nature, can be calibrated using a series of notch tensile tests. Then the same length scale from the notch tests is used in solving the problem of a high-velocity (between 89 and 107 m/s) rigid projectile colliding against a 6061-T6 aluminum-disk. The investigation indicates that incorporating a characteristic length scale to the constitutive model eliminates the pathological mesh-dependency associated with material instabilities. In addition, the numerical calculations agree well with experimental data. Next, an effort is made rather to introduce a physically motivated length scale than to apply a mathematical-one in the deformation analysis. Along this line, a dislocation based plasticity model is developed where an intrinsic length scale is introduced in the forms of spatial gradients of mobile and immobile dislocation densities. The spatial gradients are naturally invoked from balance laws within a consistent kinematic and thermodynamic framework. An analytical solution of the model variables is derived at homogenous steady state using the linear stability and bifurcation analysis. The model qualitatively captures the formation of dislocation cell-structures through material instabilities at the microscopic level. Finally, the model satisfactorily predicts macroscopic mechanical behaviors - e.g., multi-strain rate uniaxial compression, simple shear, and stress relaxation - and validates experimental results
Effects of homogenization on structure property relations of an indirect extruded ZE20 Mg alloy by Zackery Bryan McClelland( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The effect of billet homogenization on final grain size and texture along with mechanical properties after indirect extrusion of a ZE20 magnesium (Mg) alloy were studied. As-cast and homogenized ZE20 billets were indirectly extruded at 454 degrees C and an extrusion ratio of 25. Electron backscatter diffraction was used to characterize texture and grain size changes. Quasi-static mechanical testing at room temperature was conducted to determine effects on mechanical properties. The investigation of a thermal treatment on as-cast ZE20 prior to being extruded revealed an increase in ductility as well as a decrease in texture intensity of the homogenized billets
Characterization of a test stand for evaluating performance and qualifying metal media filters under ASME AG-1 by John Andrew Wilson( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Institute of Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University was awarded a contract by the DOE to design, fabricate, assemble, and characterize a research grade test stand to assist in the development of ASME AG-1 Section FI Metal Media Filters. The major barriers to completing the code section is development of a test stand for collecting data necessary to specify performance requirements for use and for filter qualification. Currently there is not a test stand capable of performing this testing. Performance criteria for the FI test stand were developed by the Section FI project team and ICET. These performance criteria were used to create a test stand to collect the data necessary to get Section FI balloted and approved
Creation of an internal state variable plasticity-damage-corrosion model validated by experiments with magnesium alloys by Christopher Avery Walton( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this study, a new consistent formulation coupling kinematics, thermodynamics, and kinetics with damage using an extended multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient that accounts for corrosion effects is presented. The technical approach used for modeling the corrosion behavior of magnesium alloys was divided into three primary steps. First, a predictive corrosion model was developed based on experimental corrosion observations. The experimentally-observed corrosion mechanisms of pitting, intergranular, and general corrosion on the AZ31 magnesium alloy were quantified in 3.5 wt.% NaCl immersion and salt spray environments using optical microscopy and laser profilometry to document the changes in the pit characteristics. Although both environments showed similar trends, the immersion environment was more deleterious with respect to intergranular and general corrosion. On the other hand, the salt-spray environment allowed deeper pits to form throughout the entirety of the experiments, which led to a substantial thickness drop (general corrosion) compared with the immersion environment. Next, the complete corrosion model based upon the internal state variable theory was formulated to capture the effects of pit nucleation, pit growth, pit coalescence, and general corrosion. Different rate equations were given for each mechanism. Following the formulation of the model, the aforementioned experimental work and experimental work on four other magnesium alloys (AZ61, AM30, AM60, and AE44), was used to validate the model
Analysis of barge impact with bridge pier by Anna Marie Miller( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Mississippi River Bridge in Vicksburg, MS is a 7 span cantilever bridge that is 3,389 feet long by 68.5 feet wide and is part of the Interstate-20 corridor. On March 23, 2011 at 1:30pm, a barge moving downstream struck a pier of the bridge. Infrasound stations located at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) detected the impact. Coincidentally, ERDC had instrumented the bridge with strain gages and accelerometers as part of a structural health monitoring project. Finite Element (FE) models were developed to investigate the structural behavior of the bridge due to the impact. The measurements and the FE models were used to determine the source mechanism of the infrasound from the bridge. Measurements from the sensors that were installed on the bridge will be presented along with FE models and infrasound data
Time-averaged surrogate modeling for small scale propellers based on high-fidelity CFD simulations by Joseph Ray Carroll( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Many Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (SUAV) are driven by small scale, fixed blade propellers. The flow produced by the propeller, known as the propeller slipstream, can have significant impact on SUAV aerodynamics. In the design and analysis process for SUAVs, numerous Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of the coupled aircraft and propeller are often conducted which require a time-averaged, steady-state approximation of the propeller for computational efficiency. Most steady-state propeller models apply an actuator disk of momentum sources to model the thrust and swirl imparted to the flow field by a propeller. These momentum source models are based on simplified theories which lack accuracy. Currently, the most common momentum source models are based on blade element theory. Blade element theory discretizes the propeller blade into airfoil sections and assumes them to behave as two-dimensional (2D) airfoils. Blade element theory neglects many 3D flow effects that can greatly affect propeller performance limiting its accuracy and range of application. The research work in this dissertation uses a surrogate modeling method to develop a more accurate momentum source propeller model. Surrogate models for the time averaged thrust and swirl produced by each blade element are trained from a database of time-accurate, high-fidelity 3D CFD propeller simulations. Since the surrogate models are trained from these high-fidelity CFD simulations, various 3D effects on propellers are inherently accounted for such as tip loss, hub loss, post stall effect, and element interaction. These efficient polynomial response surface surrogate models are functions of local flow properties at the blade elements and are embedded into 3D CFD simulations as locally adaptive momentum source terms. Results of the radial distribution of thrust and swirl for the steady-state surrogate propeller model are compared to that of time-dependent, high-fidelity 3D CFD propeller simulations for various aircraft-propeller coupled situations. This surrogate propeller model which is dependent on local flow field properties simulates the time-averaged flow field produced by the propeller at a momentum source term level of detail. Due to the nature of the training cases, it also captures the accuracy of time-dependent 3D CFD propeller simulations but at a much lower cost
Development of intermediate and high strain rate experimentation and material modeling of viscoplastic metals by Wilburn Ray Whittington( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This work presents a combined theoretical-experimental study of strain rate behavior in metals. The method is to experimentally calibrate and validate an Internal State Variable (ISV) constitutive model with a wide range of strain rate sensitivity. Therefore a practical apparatus and methodology for performing highly sought-after intermediate strain rate experimentation was created. For the first time in reported literature, the structure-property relations of Rolled Homogeneous Armor is quantified at the microscale and modeled with varying strain rates, temperatures, and stress states to capture plasticity and damage with a single set of constants that includes intermediate strain rates. A rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) was used as a material system to prove the methodology. In doing so, a newly implemented strain rate dependent nucleation parameter for RHA was implemented to transition the dominant damage mechanism from void growth to void nucleation as strain rate increased. The ISVs were utilized in finite. element analysis for robust predictability of mechanical performance as well as predictability of microstructural evolution with regards to void size and number distribution. For intermediate strain rate experiments, robust load acquisition was achieved using a novel serpentine transmittal bar that allowed for long stress waves to traverse a short bar system; this system eliminated load- ringing that plagues servo-hydraulic systems. A direct hydraulic loading apparatus was developed to provide uniform strain rates throughout intermediate rate tests to improve on the current limitations of the state-of-the-art. Key recommendations on the advancement of predictive modeling of dynamic materials, as well as performing advanced dynamic experimentation, are elucidated
A proposal for the establishment of a doctorial program in mechanical engineering [at] Mississippi State University by Mississippi State University( Book )

1 edition published in 1964 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Strategies for optimization of diesel-ignited propane dual fuel combustion in a heavy duty compression ignition engine by Chad Duane Carpenter( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A 12.9 L heavy duty compression ignition engine was tested with strategies for dual fuel optimization. The effects of varied intake manifold pressure as well as split-injection strategies at a load of 5 bar BMEP and 85 PES were observed. These results were used to allow testing of split-injection strategies at a higher load of 10 bar BMEP at 70 PES that were void of MPRR above 2000 kPa/CAD. The split-injection strategies at 5 bar BMEP showed that lower BSNOx can be achieved with minimal drop in FCE. Varying intake manifold pressure revealed that combustion occurs earlier in a cycle with increasing intake manifold pressure and indirectly increasing FCE. A load of 10 bar BMEP at 70 PES should only use split-injection strategy to maintain load without high MPRR as efficiency drops with dependency on the second injection
Mississippi State University EcoCAR extended range electric vehicle thermal system design, integration, optimization, and validation by Michael Lynn Barr( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A continued increase in government regulations for fuel economy and emissions has driven automakers and suppliers to take a large interest in hybridizing vehicles to help them achieve the new requirements. This increased vehicle electrification has resulted in unconventional vehicle cooling requirements. Electrified vehicle batteries and motors operate under different temperature regimes and cooling loads change drastically with driving styles and conditions. A variable-load cooling system was designed, implemented and tested on the Mississippi State University EcoCAR extended-range electric vehicle (E-REV). This system, utilizing variable flow pumps and variable speed fans, was shown to successfully cool the electronic components under the worst-case design conditions, while providing low energy consumption under normal conditions. When compared to a baseline system utilizing no variable duty cycle components, the variable cooling power system reduced energy consumption during testing both on-road at MSU's facility and on-road at General Motors proving grounds in Michigan
 
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