WorldCat Identities

Petraeus, David Howell

Overview
Works: 61 works in 142 publications in 1 language and 12,419 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks, manuals, etc 
Roles: Author of introduction
Classifications: U241, 355.0218
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  David Howell Petraeus Publications about David Howell Petraeus
Publications by  David Howell Petraeus Publications by David Howell Petraeus
Most widely held works about David Howell Petraeus
 
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Most widely held works by David Howell Petraeus
The U.S. Army/Marine Corps counterinsurgency field manual : U.S. Army field manual no. 3-24 : Marine Corps warfighting publication no. 3-33.5 by United States ( Book )
9 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
When the U.S. military invaded Iraq, it lacked a common understanding of the problems inherent in counterinsurgency campaigns. It had neither studied them, nor developed doctrine and tactics to deal with them. It is fair to say that in 2003, most Army officers knew more about the U.S. Civil War than about counterinsurgency. This volume was written to fill that void. The result of unprecedented collaboration among top U.S. military experts, scholars, and practitioners in the field, the manual espouses an approach to combat that emphasizes constant adaptation and learning, the importance of decentralized decision making, the need to understand local politics and customs, and the key role of intelligence in winning the support of the population. The manual also emphasizes the paradoxical and often counterintuitive nature of counterinsurgency operations: sometimes the more you protect your forces, the less secure you are; sometimes the more force you use, the less effective it is; sometimes doing nothing is the best reaction. A new introduction by Sarah Sewall, director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, places the manual in critical and historical perspective, explaining the significance and potential impact of this revolutionary challenge to conventional U.S. military doctrine. An attempt by our military to redefine itself in the aftermath of 9/11 and the new world of international terrorism, "The U.S. Army/Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual" will play a vital role in American military campaigns for years to come
The American military and the lessons of Vietnam : a study of military influence and the use of force in the post-Vietnam era by David Howell Petraeus ( )
7 editions published in 1987 in English and Undetermined and held by 28 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Report to Congress on the situation in Iraq by David Howell Petraeus ( )
3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Counterinsurgency : FM 3-24 (2006) by David Howell Petraeus ( Book )
2 editions published between 2006 and 2009 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Getting the big ideas right : the strategic concepts that helped achieve substantial progress in Iraq by David Howell Petraeus ( Book )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
U.S., coalition, and Iraqi forces have made substantial and durable progress in providing security and stability for the Iraqi people; but security alone is an insufficient foundation for maintaining the hard-fought successes achieved to date, and any assessment should be tempered by an understanding of the numerous economic, diplomatic, political, informational, rule of law, and capacity-building challenges the Iraqis must still address
Learning Counterinsurgency: Observations from Soldiering in Iraq ( )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The Army has learned a great deal in Iraq and Afghanistan about the conduct of counterinsurgency operations, and we must continue to learn all that we can from our experiences in those countries. The insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan were not, in truth, the wars for which we were best prepared in 2001; however, they are the wars we are fighting and they clearly are the kind of wars we must master. America's overwhelming conventional military superiority makes it unlikely that future enemies will confront us head on. Rather, they will attack us asymmetrically, avoiding our strengths -- firepower, maneuver, technology -- and come at us and our partners the way the insurgents do in Iraq and Afghanistan. It is imperative, therefore, that we continue to learn from our experiences in those countries, both to succeed in those endeavors and to prepare for the future. Writing down observations and lessons learned is a time-honored tradition of Soldiers. In an effort to foster learning as an organization, the Army institutionalized the process of collection, evaluation, and dissemination of observations, insights, and lessons some 20 years ago with the formation of the Center for Army Lessons Learned. In subsequent years, the other military services and the Joint Forces Command followed suit, forming their own lessons learned centers. More recently, the Internet and other knowledge-management tools have sped the processes of collection, evaluation, and dissemination enormously. In this article, the author presents the distillation of 14 observations that he recorded while serving as Commander of the 101st Airborne Division and then Commander of the Multi-National Security Transition Command-Iraq and the NATO Training Mission-Iraq during the first 2-1/2 years of U.S. involvement in Iraq
The challenge of counterinsurgency ( Recording )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
On this America Abroad, we examine the insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan, and how American troops are being trained to counter this emerging threat. The program also looks back at the history of US counterinsurgency efforts, from the Philippines to Vietnam, and explores America's efforts to support El Salvador during its war against Marxist guerillas in the 1980's. Segment 1: Ray Suarez examines the US military's response to the threat of insurgency with two leading high-ranking generals. Segment 2: Garrick Utley narrates an archival audio tour of the history of US counterinsurgency efforts, from the Philippines to Vietnam. Segment 3: Steve Roberts looks back at US efforts to support El Salvador in its war against Marxist guerillas in the 1980s. Segment 4: Marvin Kalb is joined by Kojo Nnamdi of WAMU 88.5 to moderate a special town hall event in Washington, DC on US counterinsurgency efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan. - from program website
The American military and the lessons of Vietnam : a study of military influence by David Howell Petraeus ( Book )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Interview with LTG David H. Petraeus by David Howell Petraeus ( Book )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This interview with Lieutenant General David H. Petraeus covers his command of Multinational Security Transition Command-Iraq (MNSTC-I) from June 2004 through September 2005, and deals specifically with the deployment of the 98th Division (Institutional Training) to Iraq and the evolving concept of the advisory effort. Right before assuming command of MNSTC-I, at the request of General John Abizaid, Petraeus and other soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division went to Iraq to assess the Iraqi security forces. They found very uneven quality among the forces, a general lack of necessary infrastructure, all sorts of equipment and logistical shortages, and no functional institutions to support them. Following this assessment, Petraeus received a briefing that proposed using one of the institutional training divisions to accomplish the training and advising mission which MNSTC-I was about to undertake. Based on MNSTC-I's joint manning document and request for forces, the 98th Division was identified as the first unit for the training and advisory mission. As Petraeus explains, "There was no active duty division sitting out there that hadn't been tapped at this point in time, so the expectation was that the forces were going to come out of the Reserve Component somewhere." He states that a primary challenge was establishing an ad hoc organization for the training and advisory effort, and the 98th constantly strived to match rank and expertise with requirements. Speaking of the reservists, Petraeus said, "We were just glad to get somebody over there to help us out - and the sooner the better. In some cases," he continued, "the 98th had talent that was just off the charts. For example, we had a comptroller who was an executive vice president with Goldman Sachs, the largest investment banking house in the world." He also added that, since most of the reservists were involved in institutional training and very few had seen combat, they were able to grow in experience along with their Iraqi units. Petraeus notes that the training advisors received before meeting their Iraqi charges continually changed over time, pointing to the Phoenix Academy as an example. Overall, Petraeus assesses the 98th's performance as, "Good. I think they should be justly proud of what they did," adding that, in many cases, it was not possible to distinguish Active from Reserve Component. To future commanders in similar circumstances, he recommends that they read all past lessons learned, learn about the culture in which they will operate and about how the country has worked and should work, and moreover learn a bit of the language. Petraeus closes the interview with praise for the reservists of the 98th
War stories Afghanistan American Special Ops ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
In this 'boots on the ground' episode of "War Stories," you'll see a gripping, inside look at covert intelilgence collection, high risk meets with clandestine informants, and rapid response capture-kill missions. From three month-long embeds with US soldiers and Marines, Special Operations units and the DEA, our "War Stories" team takes you on heart-thumping raids into Taliban strongholds, and you'll meet the unsung heroes who fight in the shadows to take down the Taliban. And from Kabul, General David Petraeus, the commander of all US and NATO forces in Afghanistan, gives Oliver North his assessment of the war
Iraq : the surge is working by David Howell Petraeus ( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Special edition : Counterinsurgency reader ( Book )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Report to Congress on the Situation in Iraq ( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This report presents the testimony of General David H. Petraeus, Commander of the Multi-National Force-Iraq, to Congress on 10-11 September 2007. General Petraeus begins by stating that the military objectives of the surge are, in large measure, being met. In recent months Coalition and Iraqi Security Forces have achieved progress in the security arena. Though the improvements have been uneven across Iraq, the overall number of security incidents has declined in 8 of the past 12 weeks, with the number of incidents in the last two weeks at the lowest level seen since June 2006. One reason for the decline in incidents is that Coalition and Iraqi forces have dealt significant blows to Al Qaeda-Iraq by taking away a number of their sanctuaries and gaining the initiative in many areas. They also have disrupted Shia militia extremists, capturing the head and numerous other leaders of the Iranian-supported Special Groups. Coalition and Iraqi operations also have helped reduce ethno-sectarian violence, bringing down the number of ethno-sectarian deaths substantially in Baghdad and across Iraq since December 2006. The number of overall civilian deaths also has declined during this period, and Iraqi Security Forces have continued to grow and to shoulder more of the load, albeit slowly and amid continuing concerns about the sectarian tendencies of some elements in their ranks. In what may be the most significant development of the past 8 months, the tribal rejection of Al Qaeda that started in Anbar Province and helped produce such significant change there has now spread to a number of other locations as well. In this security assessment, General Petraeus reviews the nature of the conflict in Iraq, recalls the situation before the surge, describes the current situation, and explains the recommendations that he has provided to his chain of command for the way ahead in Iraq. Fourteen briefing charts accompany the testimony
 
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Alternative Names
Howell Petraeus, David 1952-
Petraeus, David 1952-
Petraeus, David H. 1952-
Languages
English (107)
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