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Virginia Transportation Research Council

Overview
Works: 1,123 works in 1,875 publications in 1 language and 14,107 library holdings
Genres: History  Sources  Genealogy  Local history 
Roles: Other
Classifications: HE5620.S34, 388.109755
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Most widely held works about Virginia Transportation Research Council
 
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Most widely held works by Virginia Transportation Research Council
Electrochemical chloride extraction : influence of concrete surface on treatment by Stephen R Sharp( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 125 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Safety belt and motorcycle helmet use in Virginia : the December 2003 update by Cheryl Lynn( Book )

14 editions published between 2002 and 2008 in English and held by 116 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Virginia Transportation Research Council has been collecting safety belt use data in Virginia since 1974. In 1992, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) published the final guidelines for conducting surveys of belt and helmet use in the states. As of the 1992 survey, Virginia adopted the NHTSA protocol for its statewide survey. The results showed that Virginia's summer 2007 safety belt use rate was 79.9 percent and its motorcycle helmet use rate was 96.1 percent. In the 15 previous surveys, virtually all of the motorcycle drivers and passengers observed were using a helmet. For passenger car drivers and right front passengers observed from 1992 through 2007, use rates varied from a low of 67.1 percent in 1997 to a high of 80.4 percent in the summer of 2005. The summer 2007 use rate was 0.5 percent lower than the rate for summer 2005. It should be noted, however, that any differences between annual use rates might be attributable to differences in travel patterns or other extraneous variables, such as increases in gas prices and the resulting reduction in pleasure trips, rather than solely to changes in driver and occupant behavior
Brunswick County road orders, 1732-1746 by Nathaniel Mason Pawlett( Book )

4 editions published between 1988 and 2008 in English and held by 86 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The establishment and maintenance of public roads were among the most important functions of the county court during the colonial period in Virginia. Each road was opened and maintained by an overseer (or surveyor) of the highways, who was appointed each year by the Gentlemen Justices. The overseer was usually assigned all the able-bodied men (the "Labouring Male Tithables") living on or near the road. These laborers then furnished their own tools, wagons, and teams and were required to work on the roads for six days each year. County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively known as "road orders." The Virginia Transportation Research Council's published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. From 1732 to 1746 Brunswick was a giant parent county; by the end of this time, it had shrunk to very nearly its present size. The scale of the county as originally conceived made administration unwieldy, and like other large frontier counties created as a response to continued westward movement. Brunswick lost the majority of its terrioroty within about twenty-five years of its creation. The road orders contained in this volume cover the period from 1732, when Brunswick's county government first became operational, through the creation of Lunenburg County in 1746. As such they are the principal extant evidence concerning the early development of a vast area of Southside Virginia stretching as far as the Blue Ridge
Orange County road orders, 1750-1800 by Ann Brush Miller( Book )

3 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 73 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The establishment and maintenance of public roads were among the most important functions of the county court during the colonial period in Virginia. Each road was opened and maintained by an overseer (or surveyor) of the highways, who was appointed each year by the Gentlemen Justices. The overseer was usually assigned all the able-bodied men (the "Labouring Male Tithables") living on or near the road. These laborers then furnished their own tools, wagons, and teams and were required to work on the roads for six days each year. County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively known as "road orders." The Virginia Transportation Research Council's published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. The road orders contained in this volume cover the period from 1750 to 1800 during which Orange County still contained within its boundaries Greene County. In addition, this volume also contains data on transportation arteries connecting Orange County of this period with the surrounding counties: Spotsylvania to the east, Louisa and Albemarle to the south, the Blue Ridge and the counties of the Shenandoah Valley to the west, and Culpeper (present-day Culpeper, Madison and Rappahannock counties) to the north. As few road orders for eighteenth century Culpeper County survive, this volume contains the principal extant evidence concerning the later eighteenth-century road development of an area of the Virginia Piedmont stretching from the western border of Spotsylvania County to the Blue Ridge
A History of roads in Virginia : "the most convenient wayes"( Book )

2 editions published between 1989 and 1992 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Culpeper County road orders, 1763-1764 : final report by Ann Brush Miller( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The establishment and maintenance of public roads were among the most important functions of the county court during the colonial period in Virginia. Each road was opened and maintained by an overseer (or surveyor) of the highways, who was appointed each year by the Gentlemen Justices. The overseer was usually assigned all the able-bodied men (the "Labouring Male Tithables") living on or near the road. These laborers then furnished their own tools, wagons, and teams and were required to work on the roads for six days each year. County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively known as "road orders." The Virginia Transportation Research Council's published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. At its creation from Orange County in 1749, Culpeper County comprised most of the region between the Rapidan and Rappahannock rivers: the present counties of Culpeper, Madison and Rappahannock. From this territory would be cut the counties of Madison (created in 1793) and Rappahannock (1833), leaving the remainder of Culpeper County at its present boundaries. The Culpeper Court Minute Books for most of the 18th century were destroyed during the Civil War. The partial Minute Book for the years 1763-1764 is the only Court Minute Book to survive for the period when the territory of Culpeper County was at its largest extent. The road orders contained within this volume constitute the sole transportation-related court orders surviving for Culpeper County during this period
Safety belt and motorcycle helmet use in Virginia : the 1996 update by Charles B Stoke( Book )

9 editions published between 1996 and 2000 in English and held by 58 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This series of surveys to determine the safety belt and motorcycle helmet use rates in Virginia was initiated to qualify the Commonwealth for incentive funds in accordance with the requirements of Section 153 of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. To receive the funds, states had to meet specified standards with regard to the existence of pertinent statutes as well as safety belt and motorcycle helmet use rates. The National Highway TrafficSafety Administration specified the survey criteria to be used in determining a state's use rate. Over the 3 years the program was in operation (1991-93), Virginia qualified for approximately $1.6 million in funds. Even though the funding program ended, the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles requested that data collection continue and that the same methods, procedures, and sites be used as were used for the Section 153 program. This report describes the methodology used for site selection and data collection and adds the results of the 1997survey to those for the previous years (1992-96). The results show that Virginia's 1997 safety belt use rate was 67.1% and its motorcycle helmet use rate was 98.7%. The helmet use rate had been 100% in all 5 previous years of the study. For the first 5 years the survey was conducted (1992-96), the safety belt use rates were 71.6%,73.2%,71.8%,70.2%, and 69.6%, respectively. The results for 1997 confirm a downward trend in the use of life-saving and injury-prevention devices (helmets and belts) required by law in Virginia. The drop in safety belt use, from 69.6% in 1996 to 67.1% in 1997, was statistically significant (p <.05). Since 1993, when safety belt use peaked at 73.2%, the rate has declined more than 6 percentage points (8.3%)
Amelia County road orders, 1735-1753 by Nathaniel Mason Pawlett( Book )

3 editions published between 2002 and 2005 in English and held by 55 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The road history projects undertaken by the Virginia Transportation Research Council establish the feasibility of studies of early road networks and their use in the environmental review process. These projects, by gathering and publishing the early road orders of the vast parent counties, also lay the foundation for additional research by local groups over a broad area of Virginia. This volume marks the twentieth entry in the Historic Roads of Virginia series, first initiated by the Virginia Transportation Research Council (then the Virginia Highway & Transportation Research Council) in 1973. Amelia County Road Orders 1735-1753 expands the coverage of the early Southside Virginia transportation records begun in the previously published Brunswick County Road Orders 1732-1749 and Lunenburg County Road Orders 1746-1764
Concrete bridge protection and rehabilitation : chemical and physical techniques : rapid concrete bridge deck protection, repair, and rehabilitation by Michael M Sprinkel( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 53 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents the rapid methods used by state highway agencies for the protection, repair and rehabilitation of bridge decks. The report is based on a review of the literature; the responses to questionnaires sent to state departments of transportation, Canadian provinces, selected turnpike and thruway authorities, technology transfer centers, and material suppliers; and the evaluation of 50 bridge decks located in seven states. Polymer overlays, sealers, high-early strength hydraulic cement concrete overlays, and patches are compared for their performance characteristics and service life
Augusta County road orders, 1745-1769 by Nathaniel Mason Pawlett( Book )

4 editions published between 1998 and 2008 in English and held by 50 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The establishment and maintenance of public roads were among the most important functions of the county court during the colonial period in Virginia. Each road was opened and maintained by an overseer (or surveyor) of the highways, who was appointed each year by the Gentlemen Justices. The overseer was usually assigned all the able-bodied men (the "Labouring Male Tithables") living on or near the road. These laborers then furnished their own tools, wagons, and teams and were required to work on the roads for six days each year. County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively known as "road orders." The Virginia Transportation Research Council's published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. This volume is the nineteenth entry in the Historic Roads of Virginia series, initiated by the Virginia Transportation Research Council (then the Virginia Highway & Transportation Research Council) in 1973. Augusta County Road Orders 1745-1769 is also the first volume of published road orders to be concerned wholly with territory west of the Blue Ridge, although portions of the Shenandoah Valley were covered by a previous publication, Orange County Road Orders 1734-1749, which included the period the territory was part of Orange County, prior to 1745
Fairfax County road orders, 1749-1800 by Beth Mitchell( Book )

3 editions published between 2002 and 2008 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The road history projects undertaken by the Virginia Transportation Research Council establish the feasibility of studies of early road networks and their use in the environmental review process. These projects, by gathering and publishing the early road orders of the vast parent counties, also lay the foundation for additional research by local groups over a broad area of VirginiaThis volume marks the twenty-first entry in the Historic Roads of Virginia series, first initiated by the Virginia Transportation Research Council (then the Virginia Highway & Transportation Research Council) in 1973. Fairfax County Road Orders 1749-1800 is a cooperative effort of the Virginia Transportation Research Council and the Fairfax County History Commission and is the first volume in the series to cover the early transportation records for Northern Virginia
Testing of selected metallic reinforcing bars for extending the service life of future concrete bridges : summary of conclusions and recommendations by G. G Clemeña( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report summarizes the major conclusions drawn from its companion reports, which described investigations conducted using a stainless steel-clad bar, selected stainless steel bars (304, 316LN, and duplex 2205), and a carbon steel bar in concrete and in simulated concrete pore solutions (with various concentrations of chloride and pH) to assess the comparative corrosion resistance of the clad bar. The most important conclusion is that stainless steel cladding serves as an excellent protection for the carbon steel core. The clad bars and the solid stainless steel bars tolerated the same concentration of chloride ions without corroding, a level that was at least 15 times more than the corrosion threshold for carbon steel bars. Simple cost comparisons demonstrated that the clad bar is also a cost-effective reinforcement for extending the service life of future concrete bridges. Based on its excellent corrosion resistance and reasonable price, the study recommends that the clad bars be used in the construction of new concrete bridges in Virginia as long as the mechanical and physical characteristics of the bars are at least equivalent to those specified by the American Society for Testing and Materials in ASTM A 615
New Kent County and Hanover County Road Orders, 1706-1743 : transcribed from the vestry book of St. Paul's Parish by Ann Brush Miller( Book )

5 editions published between 2004 and 2008 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The road history projects undertaken by the Virginia Transportation Research Council establish the feasibility of studies of early road networks and their use in the environmental review process. These projects, by gathering and publishing the early road orders of the vast parent counties, also lay the foundation for additional research by local groups over a broad area of Virginia. This volume marks the twenty-second entry in the Historic Roads of Virginia series, first initiated by the Virginia Transportation Research Council (then the Virginia Highway & Transportation Research Council) in 1973. New Kent County and Hanover County Road Orders 1706-1743 expands the coverage of early Piedmont transportation records begun in the previously-published Goochland County Road Orders 1728-1744, Louisa County Road Orders 1742-1748, Albemarle County Road Orders 1744-1748, Albemarle County Road Orders 1783-1816, and Albemarle County Roads 1725-1816
Urban safety restraint use by infants and children under 16 years of age in Virginia : the 2002 survey results by Cheryl Lynn( Book )

4 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The principal goal of this child restraint survey has always been to estimate compliance with the relevant statutes in place at the time. Each summer, data were collected in the four metropolitan areas of Virginia (northern, eastern, central, and western) at the same sites, on the same day of the week, and at the same hour of the day. In 1997, sites in three mid-size cities with a population between 50,000 and 100,000 were added, as was data collection on safety belt use by occupants under 16 years of age. In 2002, additional sites in the existing mid-size cities were added to increase the sample size and a new mid-size city, Harrisonburg, was added. In addition, in 2002, the age categories used in the survey were changed to (1) infants and toddlers 0 through 3 years old, (2) preschoolers 4 through 5 years old, and (3) children 6 through 15 years old. These categories allowed the investigators to continue to analyze the longitudinal restraint use data and to evaluate the impact of the legislative changes made in 2002. A total of 2,823 children were observed during the 2002 summer survey of child restraint and safety belt use among persons under 16 years of age: 594 children under age 4 and 2,229 children aged 4 to 16. In 2002, total child safety seat use for metropolitan areas and mid-size cities combined was 93.2% and correct use was 70.8%. Total seat belt use among 4 to 16 year olds in metropolitan areas and mid-size cities combined was 65.6%, and correct use was 55.4%
Guidelines for the retrofit installation of accessible pedestrian signals by the Virginia Department of Transportation : Phase II report by E. D Arnold( Book )

3 editions published between 2003 and 2005 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In late 2000, the Northern Virginia District of the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) received a request from a visually impaired citizen to install accessible pedestrian signals (APS) at an intersection in Falls Church. Since there were no national or state guidelines for this type of installation, the district was asked to install APS at an intersection in a pilot effort and to develop appropriate guidelines that VDOT could use statewide for future installations. The Virginia Transportation Research Council was asked to assist in developing the guidelines. Further, a committee composed of representatives from VDOT, the Federal Highway Administration, the Virginia Department for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the blind and visually impaired community (formal organizations and individual citizen activists) was established to provide overall guidance and advice. A Phase I report documented the initial efforts to develop the guidelines and described the following sections of the guidelines: (1) a procedure for requesting APS, (2) the basic requirements for retrofitting, (3) an intersection evaluation methodology, and (4) a funding process. In addition, the report recommended that the procedures in these four sections be piloted by using them to identify other appropriate intersections at which different types of APS equipment could be installed. This Phase II report describes the results of the pilot with regard to the first four sections of the guidelines and the development of the final two sections of the guidelines: the basic statewide specifications for APS equipment, and the installation procedures. The final guidelines for installing APS at an existing intersection are included in an appendix
Risk assessment and management of critical highway infrastructure( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study expands upon the scope of a previous contract study for the Virginia Transportation Research Council (VTRC) concluded in March 2002. The objective is to develop methodologies for risk analysis of critical highway infrastructure at two levels: (1) system level and (2) asset level. The system-level analysis conducts risk assessment from a statewide perspective. The goal is to evaluate and prioritize infrastructure from a considerable inventory of assets. The definition of critical infrastructure offered by Presidential Decision Directive (PDD) 63 is used to determine the set of attributes that help differentiate critical from non-critical infrastructure. These attributes correspond to national, regional, and local impact of a structure's damage or complete loss. In addition, the levels of impact are utilized in prioritization: infrastructure that has potential national and regional impact is considered more important than infrastructure with local impact. Further prioritization is conducted based on the asset's need for risk management actions. The asset's current state or condition, in terms of resilience, robustness, redundancy, and security against willful threat is used to evaluate the need for management actions. A set of criteria and corresponding metrics is identified, and supporting data are gathered using information from the FHWA National Bridge Inventory and other sources. Once the most critical infrastructure is prioritized, an in-depth risk assessment of particular assets is performed to determine specific risks and vulnerabilities. Eight case studies on selected VDOT sites are conducted. The details of these case studies are not presented in this report. Instead, general findings are presented that can serve as a guideline for policy implementation to other similar assets. Since a small number of case studies are performed by the project team, another important goal of this study is for effective knowledge transfer of the methodology to VDOT in order to facilitate risk assessment of other critical infrastructure. For this purpose, a prototype computer tool is developed, which is designed to guide facility managers in risk assessment and management. The case studies and documentation of the computer tool are provided in supplemental documents available by request from the authors
Intellectual property : a handbook for employees of the Virginia Department of Transportation by Catherine E Colyer( Book )

7 editions published between 1997 and 2006 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This handbook is a guide to intellectual property issues that VDOT employees may encounter during the scope of their employment. However, because intellectual property is a dynamic field of law, this handbook is neither a comprehensive guide nor an accurate predictor of legal developments. This handbook is merely an effort by the Virginia Transportation Research Council to provide VDOT employees guidance in addressing the intellectual property issues they may face during the scope of their employment. This handbook is not a substitute for professional legal advice. If you need more detail concerning your individual rights and duties, you should consult an attorney. This handbook will be reviewed annually and revised periodically as warranted by changes in the law and governmental policy. This updated handbook is intended to replace the August 2005 edition. The organization of the handbook has been modified to focus on intellectual property issues related to VDOT
An observational survey of safety belt and child safety seat use in Virginia : final report : the 1990 update by Charles B Stoke( Book )

5 editions published between 1989 and 1992 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report was prepared in response to a request from the Transportation Safety Administration of the Virginia Department ofMotor Vehicles for data concerning the use of safety belts and child safety seats by the occupants of vehicles bearing Virginia license plates. In an effort to track changes in safety belt use as a result of various statutory enactments, enforcement campaigns, and public information efforts, a series of surveys were conducted over two time periods: (1) 1974 through 1977, and (2) 1983 through 1990. Until 1987, data were collected in only the four major metropolitan areas of the state. In 1987, survey sites were added in nine smaller communities. These communities are referred to as "towns," although several are legally classified as cities. Prior to enactment of the child safety seat law in 1982 and the safety belt mandatory use law in 1987, safety seat and belt use by the affected groups (children under 4 years of age and all front seat occupants, respectively) showed small yearly increases. After the effective date of each of the statutes, there was a markedly large increase in use by both target groups. The safety seat use rate remained relatively stable over the entire 8-year postlaw period, at approximately 66% of those surveyed. The front seat occupant rate peaked at nearly 62% in the first 6 months after the effective date of the law, declined to about 55% (p <.01) in 1989, and was nearly 57% in 1990. A number of other findings are presented in the report. Among these are the following: (1) belt use was highest in the northern area of the state; (2) there was little difference in use rates throughout the day; (3) a large proportion of child safety seats were misused in an obvious way; and (4) with the exception of infants, older adults had the highest rates of use. It was concluded that the major reason for the increase in safety seat and belt use was the passage of the statutes. Several actions are recommended to increase statewide safety belt use. These include (1) directing public information and enforcement efforts toward residents of smaller communities and rural areas, occupants of the rear seat, young males, and areas of the state where use rates are below 50%, and (2) amending the safety belt mandatory use law to include rear seat occupants
Business process modeling for the Virginia Department of Transportation : a demonstration with the integrated six-year improvement program and the statewide transportation improvement program by James Hamilton Lambert( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This effort demonstrates business process modeling to describe the integration of particular planning and programming activities of a state highway agency. The motivations to document planning and programming activities are that: (i) resources for construction projects are used effectively; (ii) employees know where projects are in their construction life cycles and how projects may have been changed; (iii) the time of agency employees is used effectively; and (iv) the employees are working together to complete transportation projects in a reasonable time. The effort adopts the IDEF modeling capability of the BPWin software (also known as the AllFusion Process Modeler). IDEF modeling encourages consistent documentation of who generates what information, products, services; for whom; how; and for what reasons. Across the agency, the modeling is useful in prioritizing processes for change and maintenance. The modeling empowers employees at all levels, makes institutional knowledge relevant and accessible, and removes bottlenecks. It also encourages the development of integrated systems along functional lines, including administration, engineering, and operations, and focuses agency personnel on the good rather than the perfect system. Highway agencies have multiple business processes that can benefit from an integrated description of business and technology in process models. For example, the information technology division of a large highway agency maintains and develops around sixty software applications at any one time. Business process modeling helps the division improve their allocation of resources and priorities to these applications. This document provides the purpose and scope of the effort, the method behind IDEF modeling and the AllFusion software, the results and discussion of the effort, the deliverables, and the recommendations for future work. Twelve appendices provide the technical results. The authors identify some significant benefits that can be realized by an implementing agency in exchange for modest costs
Wet night visibility of pavement markings by Ronald B Gibbons( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes an investigation into the performance of pavement markings in wet night conditions. The performance of a typical pavement marking will degrade when it gets wet. This is a result of the flooding of the marking optics, thereby reducing retroreflectivity. Several technologies are available to improve wet marking performance. In this project, six technologies were tested using both standard measurement methods and participant evaluations. The results show that two of the marking technologies, raised retroreflective markers and wet retroreflective tape, outperformed the group under all conditions. These markings were also highly accepted by the participants. The results also show that the standard paint and glass beads technology is the worst performing and the least desirable of those evaluated. A comparison of the ASTM retroreflectivity measurement methods and the measured luminance results also indicates that the methods are suitable for the conditions used in the evaluation; however, possible additions and corrections to the methods are outlined in this report. A follow-up study is underway to allow development of a performance-based specification for pavement markings for wet night visibility
 
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Fairfax County road orders, 1749-1800
Alternative Names

controlled identityUniversity of Virginia

controlled identityVirginia Center for Transportation Innovation and Research

controlled identityVirginia. Department of Transportation

controlled identityVirginia Highway & Transportation Research Council

University of Virginia Virginia Transportation Research Council

Virginia. Department of Transportation. Virginia Transportation Research Council

Virginia. Transportation Research Council

Virginia Virginia Transportation Research Council

VTRC

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Amelia County road orders, 1735-1753Augusta County road orders, 1745-1769Fairfax County road orders, 1749-1800New Kent County and Hanover County Road Orders, 1706-1743 : transcribed from the vestry book of St. Paul's Parish