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Virginia Transportation Research Council

Overview
Works: 1,218 works in 2,059 publications in 1 language and 14,540 library holdings
Genres: History  Genealogy  Sources  Local history 
Roles: Other
Classifications: TE24.V8, 388.109755
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Most widely held works about Virginia Transportation Research Council
 
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Most widely held works by Virginia Transportation Research Council
Electrochemical chloride extraction : influence of concrete surface on treatment by Stephen R Sharp( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 126 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Safety belt and motorcycle helmet use in Virginia : the Summer 2003 update by Cheryl Lynn( Book )

11 editions published between 2002 and 2006 in English and held by 92 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Virginia Transportation Research Council has been collecting safety belt use data in Virginia since 1974. In 1992, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) published the final guidelines for conducting surveys of belt and helmet use in the states. As of the 1992 survey, Virginia adopted the NHTSA protocol for its statewide survey. The results showed that Virginia's summer 2006 safety belt use rate was 78.7 percent and its motorcycle helmet use rate was 99.1 percent. In the 14 previous surveys, virtually all of the motorcycle drivers and passengers observed were using a helmet. For passenger car drivers and right front passengers observed from 1992 through 2005, use rates varied from a low of 67.1 percent in 1997 to a high of 80.4 percent in the summer of 2005. The summer 2006 use rate was 1.7 percent lower than the rate for summer 2005. It should be noted, however, that any differences between annual use rates might be attributable to differences in travel patterns or other extraneous variables, such as increases in gas prices and the resulting reduction in pleasure trips, rather than solely to changes in driver and occupant behavior
Orange County road orders, 1750-1800 by Ann Brush Miller( Book )

3 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 80 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The establishment and maintenance of public roads were among the most important functions of the county court during the colonial period in Virginia. Each road was opened and maintained by an overseer (or surveyor) of the highways, who was appointed each year by the Gentlemen Justices. The overseer was usually assigned all the able-bodied men (the "Labouring Male Tithables") living on or near the road. These laborers then furnished their own tools, wagons, and teams and were required to work on the roads for six days each year. County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively known as "road orders." The Virginia Transportation Research Council's published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. The road orders contained in this volume cover the period from 1750 to 1800 during which Orange County still contained within its boundaries Greene County. In addition, this volume also contains data on transportation arteries connecting Orange County of this period with the surrounding counties: Spotsylvania to the east, Louisa and Albemarle to the south, the Blue Ridge and the counties of the Shenandoah Valley to the west, and Culpeper (present-day Culpeper, Madison and Rappahannock counties) to the north. As few road orders for eighteenth century Culpeper County survive, this volume contains the principal extant evidence concerning the later eighteenth-century road development of an area of the Virginia Piedmont stretching from the western border of Spotsylvania County to the Blue Ridge
Brunswick County road orders, 1732-1746 by Nathaniel Mason Pawlett( Book )

2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 77 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The establishment and maintenance of public roads were among the most important functions of the county court during the colonial period in Virginia. Each road was opened and maintained by an overseer (or surveyor) of the highways, who was appointed each year by the Gentlemen Justices. The overseer was usually assigned all the able-bodied men (the "Labouring Male Tithables") living on or near the road. These laborers then furnished their own tools, wagons, and teams and were required to work on the roads for six days each year. County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively known as "road orders." The Virginia Transportation Research Council's published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. From 1732 to 1746 Brunswick was a giant parent county; by the end of this time, it had shrunk to very nearly its present size. The scale of the county as originally conceived made administration unwieldy, and like other large frontier counties created as a response to continued westward movement. Brunswick lost the majority of its terrioroty within about twenty-five years of its creation. The road orders contained in this volume cover the period from 1732, when Brunswick's county government first became operational, through the creation of Lunenburg County in 1746. As such they are the principal extant evidence concerning the early development of a vast area of Southside Virginia stretching as far as the Blue Ridge
Culpeper County road orders, 1763-1764 : final report by Ann Brush Miller( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The establishment and maintenance of public roads were among the most important functions of the county court during the colonial period in Virginia. Each road was opened and maintained by an overseer (or surveyor) of the highways, who was appointed each year by the Gentlemen Justices. The overseer was usually assigned all the able-bodied men (the "Labouring Male Tithables") living on or near the road. These laborers then furnished their own tools, wagons, and teams and were required to work on the roads for six days each year. County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively known as "road orders." The Virginia Transportation Research Council's published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. At its creation from Orange County in 1749, Culpeper County comprised most of the region between the Rapidan and Rappahannock rivers: the present counties of Culpeper, Madison and Rappahannock. From this territory would be cut the counties of Madison (created in 1793) and Rappahannock (1833), leaving the remainder of Culpeper County at its present boundaries. The Culpeper Court Minute Books for most of the 18th century were destroyed during the Civil War. The partial Minute Book for the years 1763-1764 is the only Court Minute Book to survive for the period when the territory of Culpeper County was at its largest extent. The road orders contained within this volume constitute the sole transportation-related court orders surviving for Culpeper County during this period
A History of roads in Virginia : "the most convenient wayes"( Book )

2 editions published between 1989 and 1992 in English and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Safety belt and motorcycle helmet use in Virginia : the 1998 update by Charles B Stoke( Book )

9 editions published between 1997 and 2000 in English and held by 55 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This series of surveys to determine the safety belt and motorcycle helmet use rates in Virginia was initiated to qualify the Commonwealth for incentive funds in accordance with the requirements of Section 153 of the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. To receive the funds, states had to meet specified standards with regard to the existence of pertinent statutes as well as safety belt and motorcycle helmet use rates. The National Highway TrafficSafety Administration specified the survey criteria to be used in determining a state's use rate. Over the 3 years the program was in operation (1991-93), Virginia qualified for approximately $1.6 million in funds. Even though the funding program ended, the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles requested that data collection continue and that the same methods, procedures, and sites be used as were used for the Section 153 program. This report describes the methodology used for site selection and data collection and adds the results of the 1997survey to those for the previous years (1992-96). The results show that Virginia's 1997 safety belt use rate was 67.1% and its motorcycle helmet use rate was 98.7%. The helmet use rate had been 100% in all 5 previous years of the study. For the first 5 years the survey was conducted (1992-96), the safety belt use rates were 71.6%,73.2%,71.8%,70.2%, and 69.6%, respectively. The results for 1997 confirm a downward trend in the use of life-saving and injury-prevention devices (helmets and belts) required by law in Virginia. The drop in safety belt use, from 69.6% in 1996 to 67.1% in 1997, was statistically significant (p <.05). Since 1993, when safety belt use peaked at 73.2%, the rate has declined more than 6 percentage points (8.3%)
Augusta County road orders, 1745-1769 by Nathaniel Mason Pawlett( Book )

4 editions published between 1998 and 2008 in English and held by 54 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The establishment and maintenance of public roads were among the most important functions of the county court during the colonial period in Virginia. Each road was opened and maintained by an overseer (or surveyor) of the highways, who was appointed each year by the Gentlemen Justices. The overseer was usually assigned all the able-bodied men (the "Labouring Male Tithables") living on or near the road. These laborers then furnished their own tools, wagons, and teams and were required to work on the roads for six days each year. County court records relating to roads and transportation are collectively known as "road orders." The Virginia Transportation Research Council's published volumes of road orders and related materials contain not only information on early roads, but also the names of inhabitants who lived and worked along the roadways, plantations, farms, landmarks, landforms, and bodies of water. This volume is the nineteenth entry in the Historic Roads of Virginia series, initiated by the Virginia Transportation Research Council (then the Virginia Highway & Transportation Research Council) in 1973. Augusta County Road Orders 1745-1769 is also the first volume of published road orders to be concerned wholly with territory west of the Blue Ridge, although portions of the Shenandoah Valley were covered by a previous publication, Orange County Road Orders 1734-1749, which included the period the territory was part of Orange County, prior to 1745
Concrete bridge protection and rehabilitation : chemical and physical techniques : rapid concrete bridge deck protection, repair, and rehabilitation by Michael M Sprinkel( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 53 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report presents the rapid methods used by state highway agencies for the protection, repair and rehabilitation of bridge decks. The report is based on a review of the literature; the responses to questionnaires sent to state departments of transportation, Canadian provinces, selected turnpike and thruway authorities, technology transfer centers, and material suppliers; and the evaluation of 50 bridge decks located in seven states. Polymer overlays, sealers, high-early strength hydraulic cement concrete overlays, and patches are compared for their performance characteristics and service life
Urban safety restraint use by infants and children under 16 years of age in Virginia : the 2002 survey results by Cheryl Lynn( Book )

5 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The principal goal of this child restraint survey has always been to estimate compliance with the relevant statutes in place at the time. Each summer, data were collected in the four metropolitan areas of Virginia (northern, eastern, central, and western) at the same sites, on the same day of the week, and at the same hour of the day. In 1997, sites in three mid-size cities with a population between 50,000 and 100,000 were added, as was data collection on safety belt use by occupants under 16 years of age. In 2002, additional sites in the existing mid-size cities were added to increase the sample size and a new mid-size city, Harrisonburg, was added. In addition, in 2002, the age categories used in the survey were changed to (1) infants and toddlers 0 through 3 years old, (2) preschoolers 4 through 5 years old, and (3) children 6 through 15 years old. These categories allowed the investigators to continue to analyze the longitudinal restraint use data and to evaluate the impact of the legislative changes made in 2002. A total of 2,823 children were observed during the 2002 summer survey of child restraint and safety belt use among persons under 16 years of age: 594 children under age 4 and 2,229 children aged 4 to 16. In 2002, total child safety seat use for metropolitan areas and mid-size cities combined was 93.2% and correct use was 70.8%. Total seat belt use among 4 to 16 year olds in metropolitan areas and mid-size cities combined was 65.6%, and correct use was 55.4%
New Kent County and Hanover County Road Orders, 1706-1743 : transcribed from the vestry book of St. Paul's Parish by Ann Brush Miller( Book )

5 editions published between 2004 and 2008 in English and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The road history projects undertaken by the Virginia Transportation Research Council establish the feasibility of studies of early road networks and their use in the environmental review process. These projects, by gathering and publishing the early road orders of the vast parent counties, also lay the foundation for additional research by local groups over a broad area of Virginia. This volume marks the twenty-second entry in the Historic Roads of Virginia series, first initiated by the Virginia Transportation Research Council (then the Virginia Highway & Transportation Research Council) in 1973. New Kent County and Hanover County Road Orders 1706-1743 expands the coverage of early Piedmont transportation records begun in the previously-published Goochland County Road Orders 1728-1744, Louisa County Road Orders 1742-1748, Albemarle County Road Orders 1744-1748, Albemarle County Road Orders 1783-1816, and Albemarle County Roads 1725-1816
Amelia County road orders, 1735-1753 by Nathaniel Mason Pawlett( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The road history projects undertaken by the Virginia Transportation Research Council establish the feasibility of studies of early road networks and their use in the environmental review process. These projects, by gathering and publishing the early road orders of the vast parent counties, also lay the foundation for additional research by local groups over a broad area of Virginia. This volume marks the twentieth entry in the Historic Roads of Virginia series, first initiated by the Virginia Transportation Research Council (then the Virginia Highway & Transportation Research Council) in 1973. Amelia County Road Orders 1735-1753 expands the coverage of the early Southside Virginia transportation records begun in the previously published Brunswick County Road Orders 1732-1749 and Lunenburg County Road Orders 1746-1764
Risk assessment and management of critical highway infrastructure( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study expands upon the scope of a previous contract study for the Virginia Transportation Research Council (VTRC) concluded in March 2002. The objective is to develop methodologies for risk analysis of critical highway infrastructure at two levels: (1) system level and (2) asset level. The system-level analysis conducts risk assessment from a statewide perspective. The goal is to evaluate and prioritize infrastructure from a considerable inventory of assets. The definition of critical infrastructure offered by Presidential Decision Directive (PDD) 63 is used to determine the set of attributes that help differentiate critical from non-critical infrastructure. These attributes correspond to national, regional, and local impact of a structure's damage or complete loss. In addition, the levels of impact are utilized in prioritization: infrastructure that has potential national and regional impact is considered more important than infrastructure with local impact. Further prioritization is conducted based on the asset's need for risk management actions. The asset's current state or condition, in terms of resilience, robustness, redundancy, and security against willful threat is used to evaluate the need for management actions. A set of criteria and corresponding metrics is identified, and supporting data are gathered using information from the FHWA National Bridge Inventory and other sources. Once the most critical infrastructure is prioritized, an in-depth risk assessment of particular assets is performed to determine specific risks and vulnerabilities. Eight case studies on selected VDOT sites are conducted. The details of these case studies are not presented in this report. Instead, general findings are presented that can serve as a guideline for policy implementation to other similar assets. Since a small number of case studies are performed by the project team, another important goal of this study is for effective knowledge transfer of the methodology to VDOT in order to facilitate risk assessment of other critical infrastructure. For this purpose, a prototype computer tool is developed, which is designed to guide facility managers in risk assessment and management. The case studies and documentation of the computer tool are provided in supplemental documents available by request from the authors
Wet night visibility of pavement markings by Ronald B Gibbons( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes an investigation into the performance of pavement markings in wet night conditions. The performance of a typical pavement marking will degrade when it gets wet. This is a result of the flooding of the marking optics, thereby reducing retroreflectivity. Several technologies are available to improve wet marking performance. In this project, six technologies were tested using both standard measurement methods and participant evaluations. The results show that two of the marking technologies, raised retroreflective markers and wet retroreflective tape, outperformed the group under all conditions. These markings were also highly accepted by the participants. The results also show that the standard paint and glass beads technology is the worst performing and the least desirable of those evaluated. A comparison of the ASTM retroreflectivity measurement methods and the measured luminance results also indicates that the methods are suitable for the conditions used in the evaluation; however, possible additions and corrections to the methods are outlined in this report. A follow-up study is underway to allow development of a performance-based specification for pavement markings for wet night visibility
Intellectual property : a handbook for employees of the Virginia Department of Transportation by Catherine E Colyer( Book )

6 editions published between 1997 and 2006 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This handbook is a guide to intellectual property issues that VDOT employees may encounter during the scope of their employment. However, because intellectual property is a dynamic field of law, this handbook is neither a comprehensive guide nor an accurate predictor of legal developments. This handbook is merely an effort by the Virginia Transportation Research Council to provide VDOT employees guidance in addressing the intellectual property issues they may face during the scope of their employment. This handbook is not a substitute for professional legal advice. This handbook will be reviewed annually and revised periodically as warranted by changes in the law and governmental policy. This updated handbook is intended to replace the March 2002 edition. The organization of the handbook has been modified to focus on intellectual property issues related to VDOT
Business process modeling for the Virginia Department of Transportation : a demonstration with the integrated six-year improvement program and the statewide transportation improvement program by James Hamilton Lambert( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This effort demonstrates business process modeling to describe the integration of particular planning and programming activities of a state highway agency. The motivations to document planning and programming activities are that: (i) resources for construction projects are used effectively; (ii) employees know where projects are in their construction life cycles and how projects may have been changed; (iii) the time of agency employees is used effectively; and (iv) the employees are working together to complete transportation projects in a reasonable time. The effort adopts the IDEF modeling capability of the BPWin software (also known as the AllFusion Process Modeler). IDEF modeling encourages consistent documentation of who generates what information, products, services; for whom; how; and for what reasons. Across the agency, the modeling is useful in prioritizing processes for change and maintenance. The modeling empowers employees at all levels, makes institutional knowledge relevant and accessible, and removes bottlenecks. It also encourages the development of integrated systems along functional lines, including administration, engineering, and operations, and focuses agency personnel on the good rather than the perfect system. Highway agencies have multiple business processes that can benefit from an integrated description of business and technology in process models. For example, the information technology division of a large highway agency maintains and develops around sixty software applications at any one time. Business process modeling helps the division improve their allocation of resources and priorities to these applications. This document provides the purpose and scope of the effort, the method behind IDEF modeling and the AllFusion software, the results and discussion of the effort, the deliverables, and the recommendations for future work. Twelve appendices provide the technical results. The authors identify some significant benefits that can be realized by an implementing agency in exchange for modest costs
A laboratory and field study of composite piles for bridge substructures by Miguel Angel Pando( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Typically, foundation piles are made of materials such as steel, concrete, and timber. Problems associated with use of these traditional pile materials in harsh marine environments include steel corrosion, concrete deterioration, and marine borer attack on timber piles. It has been estimated that the U.S. spends over $1 billion annually in repair and replacement of waterfront piling systems. Such high repair and replacement costs have led several North American highway agencies and researchers to investigate the feasibility of using composite piles for load bearing applications, such as bridge substructures. As used here, the term "composite piles" refers to alternative pile types composed of fiber reinforced polymers (FRPs), recycled plastics, or hybrid materials. Composite piles may exhibit longer service lives and improved durability in harsh marine environments, thereby presenting the potential for substantially reduced total costs. Composite piles have been available in the North American market since the late 1980's, but have not yet gained wide acceptance in civil engineering practice. Potential disadvantages of composite piles are high initial cost and questions about engineering performance
Issues concerning the adoption of an administrative per se statute by the Commonwealth of Virginia by Salil R Virkar( Book )

4 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The most effective measures to deter drunken driving are legal actions that provide for certain, serious, and swift sanctions. An administrative per se statute that summarily revokes or suspends a driver's license for a DUI offense satisfies these criteria. Because the revocation would be imposed by an administrative, rather than a judicial, system, concerns about due process violations have been raised. Although the Supreme Court has never directly ruled on the constitutionality of an administrative per se statute, its rulings in other cases provide indications of what would be required for such a statute to be found constitutional. This report reviews the relevant cases on the issues of due process and double jeopardy. It also discusses the statutes and experience of states with per se laws and studies that document the impact of such laws. In addition to deterring drunken driving, enactment of an administrative per se statute would benefit Virginia by bringing the Commonwealth one step closer to qualifying for additional federal funds
A study of the proposed Virginia Rail Transportation Development Authority by Roger W Howe( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Virginia Senate Bill 1279 (2003) calls for the creation of the Virginia Rail Transportation Development Authority. The purpose of this authority is "to finance or assist in the financing of the construction, repair, renovation, restoration, acquisition, and extension of rail lines, equipment, and facilities in the Commonwealth, including rolling stock, shops, terminals, bridges, tunnels, and any other passenger rail or freight rail facilities, equipment or infrastructure, upon a determination by the Authority that such action is in the public interest." Virginia Senate Joint Resolution 354 provided the argument for creating the new rail authority: (1) appropriate investments in railroad infrastructure will divert passenger and freight traffic from the highways to the railroads; (2) this will reduce the need for highway maintenance and construction, and it will reduce congestion, promote safety, and make it possible to avoid significant air and water pollution; (3) the railroads in Virginia do not have the financial resources to make the needed investments; thus, (4) a new rail authority is needed to finance or assist in the financing of the needed investments. The authors investigated rail authorities in other states in hopes of finding a model for the new rail authority. This survey did not provide any straightforward and unambiguous model for the "appropriate" structures and powers of the new authority. An examination of the Virginia Port Authority proved to be illuminating. It seems reasonable to attribute a significant part of the Virginia Port Authority's success to its "independence" from state government. Its "independence" allows it to function as a business with little interference from state government. The authors examined three options for satisfying the needs that were to be fulfilled by creating the new authority: (1) create an independent rail authority, (2) create a new rail agency within the government, or (3) provide the powers needed (such as bonding) to a rail agency that already exists: the Department of Rail and Public Transportation. A range of financial options that could be used by the new authority to mobilize additional capital for investment in rail is discussed. The authors also discuss the different ways that an authority could involve itself in the rail transport sector. Finally, the report addresses the question whether the new rail authority would violate the Constitution of Virginia. The authors argue that the chances (with some caveats) of withstanding a constitutional challenge are good
An evaluation of red light camera (photo-red) enforcement programs in Virginia : a report in response to a request by Virginia's Secretary of Transportation( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Red light running, which is defined as the act of a motorist entering an intersection after the traffic signal has turned red, caused almost 5,000 crashes in Virginia in 2003, resulting in at least 18 deaths and more than 3,800 injuries. In response to a June 2, 2004, directive from Virginia Secretary of Transportation Whittington W. Clement, an evaluation of the photo-red enforcement programs that operate in Virginia was undertaken. Generally, Virginia's photo-red programs are technically feasible. Case law strongly indicates that the programs pass legal muster in the three key areas: privacy, equal protection, and due process, and public opinion surveys suggest that roughly two-thirds of respondents support red light cameras. There is, however, a practical issue with regard to issuing citations for out-of-state motorists, as noted in the report. Although an economic analysis was not feasible in the study time frame, a limited fiscal analysis suggests that, in general, Virginia localities are not generating net revenue. Finally, an operational analysis based on violations and crashes shows a potential but not definite safety improvement. The cameras clearly affect driver behavior; across the 23 intersections where reliable citation data could be obtained, citations decreased by an average of 21% per intersection. Further the data show that the cameras are correlated with a definite decrease in crashes that are directly attributable to red light running, a definite increase in rear-end crashes, a possible decrease in angle crashes, a net decrease in injury crashes attributable to red light running, and an increase in total injury crashes. More time is needed to determine whether the severity of the eliminated red light running crashes was greater than that of the induced rear-end crashes. The report recommends that Virginia's photo-red enforcement programs be continued for an additional year to resolve this question and to collect additional data that was not feasible during the 6-month time frame of this report
 
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New Kent County and Hanover County Road Orders, 1706-1743 : transcribed from the vestry book of St. Paul's Parish
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New Kent County and Hanover County Road Orders, 1706-1743 : transcribed from the vestry book of St. Paul's Parish
Alternative Names

controlled identityUniversity of Virginia

controlled identityVirginia Center for Transportation Innovation and Research

controlled identityVirginia. Department of Transportation

controlled identityVirginia Highway & Transportation Research Council

University of Virginia Virginia Transportation Research Council

Virginia. Department of Transportation. Virginia Transportation Research Council

Virginia. Transportation Research Council

Virginia Virginia Transportation Research Council

VTRC

VTRC (Virginia Transportation Research Council)

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English (93)