WorldCat Identities

Jeffreys, Alec J.

Overview
Works: 16 works in 31 publications in 1 language and 268 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  History  Documentary films 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Alec J Jeffreys
  • DNA( Visual )
 
Most widely held works by Alec J Jeffreys
The evolution of DNA sequences : proceedings of a Royal Society Discussion Meeting, held on 13 and 14 March 1985 by Royal Society (Great Britain)( Book )

9 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 66 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

DNA fingerprinting : state of the science by S. D. J Pena( )

4 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 59 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

DNA fingerprinting had a well-defined birthday. In the March 7, 1985 issue of Nature, Alec Jeffreys and coworkers described the first develop ment ofmu1tilocus probes capable of simultaneously revealing hypervari ability at many loci in the human genome and called the procedure DNA fingerprinting. It was a royal birth in the best British tradition. In a few months the emerging technique had permitted the denouement of hith erto insoluble immigration and paternity disputes and was already heralded as a major revolution in forensic sciences. In the next year (October, 1986) DNA fingerprinting made a dramatic entree in criminal investigations with the Enderby murder case, whose story eventually was turned into a best-selling book ("The Blooding" by Joseph Wambaugh). Today DNA typing systems are routinely used in public and commercial forensic laboratories in at least 25 different countries and have replaced conventional protein markers as the methods of choice for solving paternity disputes and criminal cases. Moreover, DNA fingerprinting has emerged as a new domain of intense scientific activity, with myriad applications in just about every imaginable territory of life sciences. The Second International Conference on DNA Fingerprinting, which was held in Belo Horizonte, Brazil in November of 1992, was a clear proof of this
DNA fingerprinting : approaches and applications by Terry Burke( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 48 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although DNA fingerprinting is a very young branch of molecular genetics, being barely six years old, its recent impact on science, law and politics has been dramatic. The application of DNA finger­ printing to forensic and legal medicine has guaranteed a high public profile for this technology, and indeed, scarcely a week goes by with­ out the press reporting yet another crime successfully solved by molec­ ular genetics. Less spectacularly, but equally importantly, DNA typing methods are steadily diffusing into an ever wider set of applications and research fields, ranging from medicine through to conservation biology. To date, two DNA fingerprinting workshops have been held in the UK, one in 1988 organised by Terry Burke at the University of Leicester, and the second in 1989 at the University of Nottingham, co-ordinated by David Parkin. In parallel with these workshops, which have provided an important focus for researchers, Bill Amos and Josephine Pemberton in Cambridge have established an informal newsletter "Fingerprint News" which is playing a major role as a forum for DNA fingerprinters. By 1989, it was clear that the field had broadened sufficiently to warrant a full international meeting. As a result, Gaudenz Dolf took on the task of organising the first, of what I hope will be many, International Symposium of DNA Fingerprinting held at Bern during Ist-3rd October 1990. The success of the meeting can be judged from the remarkable attendance, with 270 delegates from no less than 30 countries
DNA( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1990, a massive enterprise was launched to map the individual genes in the human genome. Known as the Human Genome Project, it soon turned into a race and a feud. This program tracks the progress of the endeavor, detailing the scientific innovations that led to its completion, as well as its political and economic impact. Among those who discuss the project are initial rivals Francis Collins and J. Craig Venter; Dr. John Sulston; Sir Alex Jeffreys, the discoverer of DNA fingerprinting; Nobel Laureates Fred Sanger and Jim Watson; and former President Bill Clinton
DNA( Visual )

3 editions published between 2004 and 2008 in English and held by 34 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Third in a five-part series. In 1990, a massive enterprise was launched to map the individual genes in the human genome. Known as the Human Genome Project, it soon turned into a race and a feud. This program tracks the progress of the endeavor, detailing the scientific innovations that led to its completion, as well as its political and economic impact. Among those who discuss the project are initial rivals Francis Collins and J. Craig Venter; Dr. John Sulston; Sir Alex Jeffreys, the discoverer of DNA fingerprinting; Nobel Laureates Fred Sanger and Jim Watson; and former President Bill Clinton
DNA( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1990, a massive enterprise was launched to map the individual genes in the human genome. Known as the Human Genome Project, it soon turned into a race and a feud. This program tracks the progress of the endeavor, detailing the scientific innovations that led to its completion, as well as its political and economic impact. Among those who discuss the project are initial rivals Francis Collins and J. Craig Venter; Dr. John Sulston; Sir Alex Jeffreys, the discoverer of DNA fingerprinting; Nobel Laureates Fred Sanger and Jim Watson; and former President Bill Clinton
Studies on the Mitochondria of Cultured Mammalian Cells by A. J Jeffreys( Book )

2 editions published in 1975 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Digital DNA typing : [abstract] by C. L Koh( )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

These minisatellite variant repeats (MVR) are interspersed along the alleles. By means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with appropriately designed primers, followed by agarose gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization, the patterns of interspersion of repeats can be assayed to produce the internal or MVR map of variant repeat units within minisatellite alleles. For examples, the alleles of the hypervariable human minisatellite MS32 (locus D1S8) have two major types of varient 29 bp-repeat units, designated a-type and t-type repeat units. Other variant repeat units having additional sequences variations are designed null or O-type repeat units
Hump1 site variation in the DNA flanking the hypervariable minisatellite MS32 (locus D1S8) in the Malaysian population by C. L Koh( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The genotype and allele frequencies of the Hump1 site in the flanking DNA of the minisatellite MS32 (locus D1S8) in 74 Chinese, 71 Indians, and 69 Malays in Malaysia were determined. In all three ethnic groups, the numbers observed for the three Hump1 site genotypes were in accordance with those expected from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The allele frequencies observed in these three groups were about the same. Heterozygosity values at this site and values of the power of discrimination were calculated.[Authors' abstract]
Hypervariable 'minisatellite' regions in human DNA by A. J Jeffreys( )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The human genome contains many dispersed tandem-repetitive "minisatellite: regions detected via a shared 10-15 base poir regions "core" sequence similar to the generalized recobination segnal (X) of Escherichia coli
DNA "fingerprints" and segregation analysis of multiple markers in human pedigrees by A. J Jeffreys( )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Tandem-repetitive DNA hybridization probes based on a putative human recombination signal detect multiple polymorphic minisatellite fragments in human DNA. The genetic complexity of the resulting individual-specific DNA "fingerprints" was investigated by studying a large sibship affected by neurofibromatosis and a more extensive pedigree segregating for two different hemoglobinopathies. The segregation of up to 41 different heterozygous DNA fragments from each parent could be analyzed in a single sibship, using two different repeat probes. Most of these variable DNA fragments could not be paired as alleles, to an extent which suggests that the DNA fingerprints are together derived from ~ 60 heterozygous loci (~ 120 variable fragments), only a proportion ofwhich can be scored in a given individual. Two or three of the DNA fragments detected by one probe showed tight linkage and may be derived from long minisatellite(s) that are cleaved to produce more than one polymorphic DNA fragment. Excluding allelic and linked DNA fragments, almost all remaining scorable fragments segregated independently, allowing up to 34 unlinked loci to be examined simultaneously. These loci are scattered over most or all of the human autosomes. Minisatellite probes are therefore suitable for rapid marker generation and can be applied to linkage analysis in human pedigrees
UK biobank project( Recording )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Tom Fielden reports on the UK Biobank Project and hears from those both for and against it
HgaI site variation in the DNA flanking the hypervariable minisatellite MS31 (locus D7S21) in the Malaysian population by C. L Koh( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The genotype variation allele frequencies of the HgaI site in the flanking DNA of the minisatellite MS31 (locus D7S21) in 77 Chinese, 71 Indians, and 69 Malays in Malaysia were determined. In all three ethnic groups, the numbers observed for the three HgaI site genotypes were in accordance with those expected from Hardy-Weiberg equilibrium. Heterozygosity values at this site and values of the power of discrimination were calculated. [Authors' abstract]
The efficiency of multilocus DNA fingerprint probes for individualization and establishment of family relationships, determined from extensive casework by A. J Jeffreys( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Recent studies of gene evolution using recombinant DNA( )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Individual-specific "fingerprints" of human DNA by A. J Jeffreys( Book )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Alternative Names
Alec J. Jeffreys

Alec J. Jeffreys britisk genetiker

Alec Jeffreys British geneticist

Alec Jeffreys Brits klinische genetica

Alec Jeffreys brytyjski genetyk

Alec Jeffreys généticien britannique

Alec Jeffreys genetista británico

Alec Jefreys genetista británico

Alec John Jeffreys britischer Genetiker

Alek Džefriz

Jeffreys, A. J.

Алек Джеффрис британский генетик

Алек Џефриз

Джеффрис, Алек

أليك جيفريز

أليك جيفريز عالم وراثة من المملكة المتحدة

الک جان جفریز

アレック・ジェフェリーズ

亚历克·杰弗里斯

Languages
English (31)