WorldCat Identities

Li, Wai-yee

Overview
Works: 40 works in 141 publications in 2 languages and 4,718 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Records and correspondence  Sources 
Roles: Author, Translator, Editor, win, Contributor
Classifications: PL2297, 895.1090048
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Wai-yee Li
Enchantment and disenchantment : love and illusion in Chinese literature by Wai-yee Li( )

18 editions published between 1993 and 2016 in English and held by 1,181 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Li begins by defining the context of these issues through the study of an entire poetic tradition, placing special emphasis on the role of language and of the feminine element. Then, focusing on the "dream plays" by Tang Hsien-tsu, she turns to the late Ming, an age which discovers radical subjectivity, and goes on to explore a seventeenth-century collection of classical tales, Records of the Strange from the Liaochai Studio by Pu Sung-ling. The latter half of the book is devoted to a thorough analysis of The Dream of the Red Chamber, the most profound treatment of the dialectic of enchantment and disenchantment, love and enlightenment, illusion and reality
The Columbia anthology of Yuan drama by Chih-tsing Hsia( )

7 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 1,022 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This anthology features translations of ten seminal plays written during the Yuan dynasty (1279?1368), a period considered the golden age of Chinese theater. By turns lyrical and earthy, sentimental and ironic, Yuan drama spans a broad emotional, linguistic, and stylistic range. Combining sung arias with declaimed verses and doggerels, dialogues and mime, and jokes and acrobatic feats, Yuan drama formed a vital part of China's culture of performance and entertainment in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. To date, few Yuan-dynasty plays have been translated into English. Well-known
Zuo tradition = Zuozhuan : commentary on the "Spring and autumn annals" by Andrew H Plaks( )

27 editions published in 2016 in 3 languages and held by 764 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Zuo Tradition (Zuozhuan; sometimes called The Zuo Commentary) is China's first great work of history. It consists of two interwoven texts: the Spring and Autumn Annals (Chunqiu, a terse annalistic record) and a vast web of narratives and speeches that add context and interpretation to the Annals. Completed by about 300 BCE, it is the longest and one of the most difficult texts surviving from pre-imperial times. It has been as important to the foundation and preservation of Chinese culture as the historical books of the Hebrew Bible have been to the Jewish and Christian traditions. It has shaped notions of history, justice, and the significance of human action in the Chinese tradition, perhaps more so than any comparable work of Latin or Greek historiography with respect to Western civilization. This translation, accompanied by the original text with an introduction and annotations, will finally make Zuozhuan accessible to all"--Provided by publisher
The letter to Ren An & Sima Qian's legacy by Stephen W Durrant( )

5 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 466 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"'Surely, a man has but one death. That death may be as heavy as Mount Tai or as light as a goose feather. It is how he uses that death that makes all the difference!' So wrote Sima Qian (first century BCE), author of Record of the Historian (Shiji), the first comprehensive history of China's past, in his 'Letter to Ren An.' In this, the most famous letter in Chinese history, he explains his decision to finish his life's work, the first comprehensive history of the Chinese past, which was begun by his late father, rather than to honorably commit suicide following his castration for 'deceiving the emperor.' The authenticity of the letter, which is included in Sima Qian's biography in Ban Gu's (CE 32-92) History of the Han Dynasty, has been debated for millennia. Is it a genuine piece of writing by Sima Qian addressed to a fellow sufferer who was himself languishing in prison and would die in 91 BCE? Or is it a very early work of literary impersonation whereby Ban Gu or a still earlier author sought to elucidate Sima Qian's reasoning through an epistle? Conceived as a text for Chinese history courses, this compact volume provides a full translation of the letter (along with the original Chinese text) and uses different interpretations of this key document to explore issues in textual history, epistolary culture, Han politics, and Han thought. It shows how ideas about friendship, loyalty, factionalism, and authorship encoded in the letter have far-reaching implications for the study of China"--Provided by publisher
The readability of the past in early Chinese historiography by Wai-yee Li( Book )

10 editions published between 2005 and 2016 in English and Chinese and held by 361 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The past becomes readable when we can tell stories and make arguments about it. It is when we can tell more than one story or make divergent arguments that the readability of the past becomes an issue. Therein lies the beginning of history, the sense of inquiry that heightens our awareness of the grounds for interpretation. How do interpretive structures develop and disintegrate? What are the possibilities and limits of historical knowledge, or the scope and meaning of skepticism?" "This book explores these issues through a study of the Zuozhuan, a foundational text in the Chinese tradition, whose rhetorical and analytical self-consciousness reveals much about the contending ways of thought unfolding during the period of the text's formation (ca. 4th. c. BCE). But in what sense is this vast collection of narratives and speeches covering the period from 722 to 468 BCE "historical"? If one can speak of an emergent sense of history in this text, Wai-yee Li argues, it lies precisely at the intersection of varying conceptions of interpretation and rhetoric brought to bear on the past, within a larger context of competing solutions to the instability and disintegration represented through the events of the 255 years covered by the Zuozhuan. Even as its accounts of proliferating disorder and disintegration challenge the boundaries of readability, the deliberations on the rules of reading in the Zuozhuan probe the dimensions of historical self-consciousness."--Jacket
Trauma and transcendence in early Qing literature( Book )

9 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 300 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Oxford handbook of classical Chinese literature (1000 BCE-900 CE)( Book )

13 editions published in 2017 in English and held by 286 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This volume introduces readers to classical Chinese literature from its beginnings (ca. 10th century BCE) to the tenth century CE. It asks basic questions such as: How did reading and writing practices change over these two millennia? How did concepts of literature evolve? What were the factors that shaped literary production and textual transmission? How do traditional bibliographic categories, modern conceptions of genre, and literary theories shape our understanding of classical Chinese literature? What are the recurrent and evolving concerns of writings within the period under purview? What are the dimensions of human experience they address? Why is classical Chinese literature important for our understanding of pre-modern East Asia? How does the transmission of this literature in Japan, Korea, and Vietnam define cultural boundaries? And what, in turn, can we learn from the Chinese-style literatures of Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, about Chinese literature? In addressing these questions, the Oxford Handbook of Classical Chinese Literature departs from standard literary histories and sourcebooks. It does not simply categorize literary works according to periods, authors, or texts. Its goal is to offer a new conceptual framework for thinking about classical Chinese literature by defining a four-part structure. The first section discusses the basics of literacy and includes topics such as writing systems, manuscript culture, education, and loss and preservation in textual transmission. It is followed by a second section devoted to conceptions of genre, textual organization, and literary signification throughout Chinese history. A third section surveys literary tropes and themes. The final section takes us beyond China to the surrounding cultures that adopted Chinese culture and produced Chinese style writing adapted to their own historical circumstances. The volume is sustained by a dual foci: the recuperation of historical perspectives for the period it surveys and the attempt to draw connections between past and present, demonstrating how the viewpoints and information in this volume yield insights into modern China and east Asia."--Publisher's description
Women and National Trauma in Late Imperial Chinese Literature by Wai-yee Li( Book )

6 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 275 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Studies works by women and by men assuming a woman's voice and works where women are significant drawn from the period of the transition between the Ming and Qing dynasties
Rhetoric of fantasy and rhetoric of irony : studies in Liao-chai chih-i and Hung-lou meng by Wai-yee Li( )

9 editions published between 1988 and 1992 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women and national trauma in late imperial Chinese literature by Wai-yee Li( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Oxford handbook of classical Chinese literature (1000 BCE-900 CE)( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women as emblems of dynastic fall in Qing literature by Wai-yee Li( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The crisis of witnessing in Du Fu's "A song of my thoughts when going from the capital to Fengxian : five hundred words" by Wai-yee Li( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Languages of love and parameters of culture in Peony pavilion and the story of the stone by Wai-yee Li( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chonjae Sŏnsaeng munjip by Hwi-il Yi( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in Chinese and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

History and memory in Wu Weiye's poetry by Wai-yee Li( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Zhi du jun heng yu zhi du yan jin( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in Chinese and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On making noise in Qi wu lun by Wai-yee Li( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Confronting history and its alternatives in early Qing poetry : an introduction by Wai-yee Li( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women and national trauma in Late Imperial Chinese literature by Wai-yee Li( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Ming–Qing dynastic transition in seventeenth-century China was an epochal event that reverberated in Qing writings and beyond; political disorder was bound up with vibrant literary and cultural production. This book focuses on the discursive and imaginative space commanded by women. Encompassing writings by women and by men writing in a feminine voice or assuming a female identity, as well as writings that turn women into a signifier through which authors convey their lamentation, nostalgia, or moral questions for the fallen Ming, the book delves into the mentality of those who remembered or reflected on the dynastic transition, as well as those who reinvented its significance in later periods. It shows how history and literature intersect, how conceptions of gender mediate the experience and expression of political disorder. Why and how are variations on themes related to gender boundaries, female virtues, vices, agency, and ethical dilemmas used to allegorize national destiny? In pursuing answers to these questions, Wai-yee Li explores how this multivalent presence of women in different genres provides a window into the emotional and psychological turmoil of the Ming-Qing transition and of subsequent moments of national trauma.0
 
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WorldCat IdentitiesRelated Identities
Enchantment and disenchantment : love and illusion in Chinese literature
Covers
The readability of the past in early Chinese historiographyTrauma and transcendence in early Qing literature
Alternative Names
Li, Hui yi 1959-

Li, Huiyi 1959-

Li Wai-yee

Li, Waiyee

Li, Waiyee 1959-

Wai-yee Li.

Wai-yee Li 1959-

李, 惠儀 1959-

李惠仪

李惠儀 1959-

Languages
English (108)

Chinese (8)