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National Research Council (U.S.). Air Force Studies Board

Overview
Works: 35 works in 91 publications in 1 language and 13,042 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  History 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about National Research Council (U.S.).
 
Most widely held works by National Research Council (U.S.).
Improving the efficiency of engines for large nonfighter aircraft by National Research Council (U.S.)( )

6 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 1,490 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Because of the important national defense contribution of large, non-fighter aircraft, rapidly increasing fuel costs and increasing dependence on imported oil have triggered significant interest in increased aircraft engine efficiency by the U.S. Air Force. To help address this need, the Air Force asked the National Research Council (NRC) to examine and assess technical options for improving engine efficiency of all large non-fighter aircraft under Air Force command. This report presents a review of current Air Force fuel consumption patterns; an analysis of previous programs designed to replace aircraft engines; an examination of proposed engine modifications; an assessment of the potential impact of alternative fuels and engine science and technology programs, and an analysis of costs and funding requirements
Assessment of wingtip modifications to increase the fuel efficiency of Air Force aircraft by Committee on Assessment of Aircraft Winglets for Large Aircraft Fuel Efficiency( )

6 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 1,420 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The high cost of aviation fuel has resulted in increased attention by Congress and the Air Force on improving military aircraft fuel efficiency. One action considered is modification of the aircraft's wingtip by installing, for example, winglets to reduce drag. While common on commercial aircraft, such modifications have been less so on military aircraft. In an attempt to encourage greater Air Force use in this area, Congress, in H. Rept. 109-452, directed the Air Force to provide a report examining the feasibility of modifying its aircraft with winglets. To assist in this effort, the Air Force asked the NRC to evaluate its aircraft inventory and identify those aircraft that may be good candidates for winglet modifications. This report-which considers other wingtip modifications in addition to winglets-presents a review of wingtip modifications; an examination of previous analyses and experience with such modifications; and an assessment of wingtip modifications for various Air Force aircraft and potential investment strategies
Evaluation of U.S. Air Force preacquisition technology development by National Research Council (U.S.)( )

6 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 1,420 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From the days of biplanes and open cockpits, the air forces of the United States have relied on the mastery of technology. From design to operation, a project can stretch to 20 years and more, with continuous increases in cost. Much of the delay and cost growth afflicting modern United States Air Force (USAF) programs is rooted in the incorporation of advanced technology into major systems acquisition. Leaders in the Air Force responsible for science and technology and acquisition are trying to determine the optimal way to utilize existing policies, processes, and resources to properly document and execute pre-program of record technology development efforts, including opportunities to facilitate the rapid acquisition of revolutionary capabilities and the more deliberate acquisition of evolutionary capabilities. This book responds to this need with an examination of the current state of Air Force technology development and the environment in which technology is acquired. The book considers best practices from both government and industry to distill appropriate recommendations that can be implemented within the USAF.--Publisher's description
Examination of the U.S. Air Force's aircraft sustainment needs in the future and its strategy to meet those needs by National Research Council (U.S.)( )

5 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 1,362 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The ability of the United States Air Force (USAF) to keep its aircraft operating at an acceptable operational tempo, in wartime and in peacetime, has been important to the Air Force since its inception. This is a much larger issue for the Air Force today, having effectively been at war for 20 years, with its aircraft becoming increasingly more expensive to operate and maintain and with military budgets certain to further decrease. The enormously complex Air Force weapon system sustainment enterprise is currently constrained on many sides by laws, policies, regulations and procedures, relationships, and organizational issues emanating from Congress, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the Air Force itself. Against the back-drop of these stark realities, the Air Force requested the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies, under the auspices of the Air Force Studies Board to conduct and in-depth assessment of current and future Air Force weapon system sustainment initiatives and recommended future courses of action for consideration by the Air Force. Examination of the U.S. Air Force's Aircraft Sustainment Needs in the Future and Its Strategy to Meet Those Needs addresses the following topics: Assess current sustainment investments, infrastructure, and processes for adequacy in sustaining aging legacy systems and their support equipment. Determine if any modifications in policy are required and, if so, identify them and make recommendations for changes in Air Force regulations, policies, and strategies to accomplish the sustainment goals of the Air Force. Determine if any modifications in technology efforts are required and, if so, identify them and make recommendations regarding the technology efforts that should be pursued because they could make positive impacts on the sustainment of the current and future systems and equipment of the Air Force. Determine if the Air Logistics Centers have the necessary resources (funding, manpower, skill sets, and technologies) and are equipped and organized to sustain legacy systems and equipment and the Air Force of tomorrow. Identify and make recommendations regarding incorporating sustainability into future aircraft designs
Pre-milestone A and early-phase systems engineering : a retrospective review and benefits for future Air Force systems acquisition by National Research Council (U.S.)( )

6 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,218 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Energy reduction at U.S. Air Force facilities using industrial processes : a workshop summary by National Research Council (U.S.)( )

3 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 1,013 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The Department of Defense (DoD) is the largest consumer of energy in the federal government. In turn, the U.S. Air Force is the largest consumer of energy in the DoD, with a total annual energy expenditure of around 10 billion dollars. Approximately 84 percent of Air Force energy use involves liquid fuel consumed in aviation whereas approximately 12 percent is energy (primarily electricity) used in facilities on the ground. This workshop was concerned primarily with opportunities to reduce energy consumption within Air Force facilities that employ energy intensive industrial processes for example, assembly/disassembly, painting, metal working, and operation of radar facilities such as those that occur in the maintenance depots and testing facilities. Air Force efforts to reduce energy consumption are driven largely by external goals and mandates derived from Congressional legislation and executive orders. To date, these goals and mandates have targeted the energy used at the building or facility level rather than in specific industrial processes. In response to a request from the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Energy and the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Science, Technology, and Engineering, the National Research Council, under the auspices of the Air Force Studies Board, formed the Committee on Energy Reduction at U.S. Air Force Facilities Using Industrial Processes: A Workshop. The terms of reference called for a committee to plan and convene one 3 day public workshop to discuss: (1) what are the current industrial processes that are least efficient and most cost ineffective? (2) what are best practices in comparable facilities for comparable processes to achieve energy efficiency? (3) what are the potential applications for the best practices to be found in comparable facilities for comparable processes to achieve energy efficiency? (4) what are constraints and considerations that might limit applicability to Air Force facilities and processes over the next ten year implementation time frame? (5) what are the costs and paybacks from implementation of the best practices? (6) what will be a proposed resulting scheme of priorities for study and implementation of the identified best practices? (7) what does a holistic representation of energy and water consumption look like within operations and maintenance?"--Publisher's description
Assessment to enhance Air Force and Department of Defense prototyping for the new defense strategy : a workshop summary by National Research Council (U. S.)( )

3 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 962 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Assessment to Enhance Air Force and Department of Defense Prototyping for the New Defense Strategy is the summary of a workshop convened by the Air Force Studies Board of the National Academies' National Research Council in September 2013 to enhance Air Force and Department of Defense (DoD) prototyping for the new defense strategy. This workshop examined of a wide range of prototyping issues, including individual recommendations for a renewed prototype program, application of prototyping as a tool for technology/system development and sustainment (including annual funding), and positive and negative effects of a renewed program. Prototyping has historically been of great benefit to the Air Force and DoD in terms of risk reduction and concept demonstration prior to system development, advancing new technologies, workforce enhancement and skills continuity between major acquisitions, dissuasion of adversaries by demonstrating capabilities, maintaining technological surprise through classified technologies, and an overarching strategy of overall risk reduction during austere budget environments. Over the last two decades, however, many issues with prototyping have arisen. For example, the definitions and terminology associated with prototyping have been convoluted and budgets for prototyping have been used as offsets to remedy budget shortfalls. Additionally, prototyping has been done with no strategic intent or context, and both government and industry have misused prototyping as a key tool in the DoD and defense industrial base. Assessment to Enhance Air Force and Department of Defense Prototyping for the New Defense Strategy envisions a prototyping program that encourages innovation in new concepts and approaches and provides a means to assess and reduce risk before commitment to major new programs."--Publisher's description
U.S. Air Force Strategic Deterrence Capabilities in the 21st Century Security Environment : a workshop summary by Norm Haller( )

4 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 928 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Changes in the 21st century security environment require new analytic approaches to support strategic deterrence. Because current adversaries may be deterred from the use of nuclear weapons differently than were Cold War adversaries, the Air Force needs an analytic process and tools that can help determine those Air Force capabilities that will successfully deter or defeat these new nuclear-armed adversaries and assure U.S. allies. While some analytic tools are available, a coherent approach for their use in developing strategy and policy appears to be lacking. Without a coherent analytic approach that addresses the nuances of today's security environment, Air Force views of its strategic deterrence needs may not be understood or accepted by the appropriate decision makers. A coherent approach will support Air Force decisions about its strategic force priorities and needs, deter actual or potential adversaries, and assure U.S. allies. In this context, the Air Force in 2012 requested that the Air Force Studies Board of the National Research Council undertake a workshop to bring together national experts to discuss current challenges relating strategic deterrence and potential new tools and methods that the Air Force might leverage in its strategic deterrence mission. The workshop consisted of two 3-day sessions held in Washington, DC on September 26-28, 2012 and January 29-31, 2013 and was attended by a very diverse set of participants with expertise in strategic deterrence and a range of analytic tools of potential interest to the Air Force. U.S. Air Force Strategic Deterrence Capabilities in the 21st Century Security Environment summarizes this workshop."--Publisher's description
U.S. Air Force strategic deterrence analytic capabilities : an assessment of tools, methods, and approaches for the 21st century security environment by Air Force Studies Board( )

4 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 913 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Since the early 1960s, the U.S. strategic nuclear posture has been composed of a triad of nuclear-certified long-range bombers, intercontinental ballistic missiles, and submarine-launched ballistic missiles. Since the early 1970s, U.S. nuclear forces have been subject to strategic arms control agreements. The large numbers and diversified nature of the U.S. nonstrategic (tactical) nuclear forces, which cannot be ignored as part of the overall nuclear deterrent, have decreased substantially since the Cold War. While there is domestic consensus today on the need to maintain an effective deterrent, there is no consensus on precisely what that requires, especially in a changing geopolitical environment and with continued reductions in nuclear arms. This places a premium on having the best possible analytic tools, methods, and approaches for understanding how nuclear deterrence and assurance work, how they might fail, and how failure can be averted by U.S. nuclear forces. U.S. Air Force Strategic Deterrence Analytic Capabilities identifies the broad analytic issues and factors that must be considered in seeking nuclear deterrence of adversaries and assurance of allies in the 21st century. This report describes and assesses tools, methods - including behavioral science-based methods - and approaches for improving the understanding of how nuclear deterrence and assurance work or may fail in the 21st century and the extent to which such failures might be averted or mitigated by the proper choice of nuclear systems, technological capabilities, postures, and concepts of operation of American nuclear forces. The report recommends criteria and a framework for validating the tools, methods, and approaches and for identifying those most promising for Air Force usage."--Publisher's description
Development planning : a strategic approach to future Air Force capabilities by National Research Council (U.S.)( )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 907 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Development Planning provides recommendations to improve development planning for near-term acquisition projects, concepts not quite ready for acquisition, corporate strategic plans, and training of acquisition personnel. This report reviews past uses of development planning by the Air Force, and offers an organizational construct that will help the Air Force across its core functions. Developmental planning, used properly by experienced practitioners, can provide the Air Force leadership with a tool to answer the critical question, Over the next 20 years in 5-year increments, what capability gaps will the Air Force have that must be filled? Development planning will also provide for development of the workforce skills needed to think strategically and to defectively define and close the capability gap. This report describes what development planning could be and should be for the Air Force."--Publisher description
Opportunities for the Employment of Simulation in U.S. Air Force Training Environments : a workshop report by Opportunities for the Employment of Simulation in U.S. Air Force Training Environments( )

2 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 586 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Simulators currently provide an alternative to aircraft when it comes to training requirements, both for the military and for commercial airlines. For the U.S. Air Force, in particular, simulation for training offers a cost-effective way, and in many instances a safer way in comparison with live flying, to replicate real-world missions. Current technical issues related to simulation for training include simulation fidelity and multi-level security, among others, which will need to be addressed in order for the Air Force to take full advantage of this technology. The workshop held in November, 2014 examined the current status of simulation training, alternative uses, current and future technologies, and how the combination of simulation and live training can improve aircrew training. The scope of the workshop focused on technologies and practices that could be applicable to high-end aircraft simulations."-- Publisher's description
Selected Directed Energy Research and Development for U.S. Air Force Aircraft Applications : Workshop Summary by National Research Council (U.S.)( )

2 editions published between 1900 and 2013 in English and held by 376 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Selected directed energy research and development for U.S. Air Force aircraft applications : a workshop summary by Robert J. Katt( )

3 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 182 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The U.S. Air force currently invests significantly in science and technology for directed-energy weapon (DEW) systems. Key elements of this investment include high-energy lasers and high-power microwaves. Other DEW research and development efforts include: optical beam control for high-energy lasers; vulnerability and lethality assessments; and advanced non-conventional and innovative weapons. Selected Directed Energy Research and Development for U.S. Air Force Aircraft Applications is the summary of three workshop sessions convened between February and April, 2013 by the Air Force Studies Board of the National Academies' National Research Council. Representatives from the Air Force science and technology community and DEW experts from the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, Office of the Secretary of Defense, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency presented and discussed threats that DEW capabilities might defend against and assessments of foreign progress in DEW. This report examines the current status of DEW capabilities both in the U.S. and abroad, and considers future applications of DEW systems."--Publisher description
Vulnerability assessment of aircraft : a review of the Department of Defense live fire test and evaluation program by National Research Council (U.S.)( )

3 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 146 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Zero-sustainment aircraft for the U.S. Air Force : a workshop summary by Greg Eyring( Book )

3 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Overall Air Force weapon system sustainment (WSS) costs are growing at more than 4 percent per year, while budgets have remained essentially flat. The cost growth is due partly to aging of the aircraft fleet, and partly to the cost of supporting higher-performance aircraft and new capabilities provided by more complex and sophisticated systems, such as the latest intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) platforms. Furthermore, the expectation for the foreseeable future is that sustainment budgets are likely to decrease, so that the gap between budgets and sustainment needs will likely continue to grow wider. Most observers accept that the Air Force will have to adopt new approaches to WSS if it is going to address this problem and remain capable of carrying out its missions. In this context, the original intent of this 3-day workshop was to focus on ways that science and technology (S & T) could help the Air Force reduce sustainment costs. However, as the workshop evolved, the discussions focused more and more on Air Force leadership, management authority, and culture as the more critical factors that need to change in order to solve sustainment problems. Many participants felt that while S & T investments could certainly help--particularly if applied in the early stages ("to the left") of the product life cycle--adopting a transformational management approach that defines the user-driven goals of the enterprise, empowers people to achieve them, and holds them accountable, down to the shop level. Several workshop participants urged Air Force leaders to start the process now, even though it will take years to percolate down through the entire organization. These sustainment concerns are not new and have been studied extensively, including recent reports from the National Research Council's Air Force Studies Board and the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board."--Publisher's website
25 years of service 1962-1987 : proceedings of the Air Force Studies Board Symposium on Air Force Research and Development, 16 November 1987 by Air Force Studies Board Symposium on Air Force Research & Development( Book )

3 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Advanced robotics for Air Force operations( Book )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Accuracy of time transfer in satellite systems by National Research Council (U.S.)( Book )

2 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report evaluates and determines adequacy of corrections for relativistic effects in present Air Force programs to perform their mission, e.g., the global positioning system (GPS). Report determines adequacy of present methods for meeting Air Force mission needs and explains future uses and needs for time transfer, including use of time transfer to test the postulates of relativity theory. Keywords include: global positioning system, NAVSTAR, relativistic effects, and time transfer
Optimizing U.S. Air Force and Department of Defense review of Air Force acquisition programs by National Research Council (U.S.)( )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Department of Defense (DOD) spends over $300 billion each year to develop, produce, field and sustain weapons systems (the U.S. Air Force over $100 billion per year). DOD and Air Force acquisitions programs often experience large cost overruns and schedule delays leading to a loss in confidence in the defense acquisition system and the people who work in it. Part of the DOD and Air Force response to these problems has been to increase the number of program and technical reviews that acquisition programs must undergo. This book looks specifically at the reviews that U.S. Air Force acquisition programs are required to undergo and poses a key question: Can changes in the number, content, or sequence of reviews help Air Force program managers more successfully execute their programs? This book concludes that, unless they do it better than they are now, Air Force and DOD attempts to address poor acquisition program performance with additional reviews will fail. This book makes five recommendations that together form a gold standard for conduct of reviews and if implemented and rigorously managed by Air Force and DOD acquisition executives can increase review effectiveness and efficiency. The bottom line is to help program managers successfully execute their programs
Adapting software development policies to modern technology by National Research Council (U.S.)( Book )

2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Improving the efficiency of engines for large nonfighter aircraft
Covers
Assessment of wingtip modifications to increase the fuel efficiency of Air Force aircraftEvaluation of U.S. Air Force preacquisition technology developmentPre-milestone A and early-phase systems engineering : a retrospective review and benefits for future Air Force systems acquisitionOptimizing U.S. Air Force and Department of Defense review of Air Force acquisition programs
Alternative Names

controlled identityAssembly of Engineering (U.S.). Air Force Studies Board

National Research Council Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems Air Force Studies Board

National Research Council Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences Air Force Studies Board

National Research Council (U.S.). Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems. Air Force Studies Board

National Research Council (U.S.). Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences. Air Force Studies Board

Languages
English (70)