WorldCat Identities

Dillwyn, William 1743-1824

Overview
Works: 37 works in 94 publications in 1 language and 1,536 library holdings
Genres: Controversial literature  Records and correspondence  History  Diaries  Trials, litigation, etc 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: Z1215, 326.4
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about William Dillwyn
 
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Most widely held works by William Dillwyn
The case of our fellow-creatures, the oppressed Africans, respectfully recommended to the serious consideration of the legislature of Great-Britain, by the people called Quakers by London Yearly Meeting (Society of Friends)( )

10 editions published between 1783 and 1784 in English and held by 499 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Meditations written during the prevalence of the yellow fever in the city of Philadelphia, in the year 1793 by Joshua Cresson( )

5 editions published in 1803 in English and held by 94 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An essay on slavery by Granville Sharp( )

1 edition published in 1773 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The case of our fellow-creatures, the oppressed Africans by London Yearly Meeting (Society of Friends)( )

1 edition published in 1784 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

<P>Published in 1784, this pamphlet is an early attempt by Quaker groups to ban the slave trade in Great Britain.</p>
Meditations written during the prevalence of the yellow fever, in the city of Philadelphia, in the year 1793; which proved fatal to upwards of 4000 of its inhabitants by John Cresson( Book )

1 edition published in 1793 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The just limitation of slavery in the laws of God, compared with the unbounded claims of the African traders and British American slaveholders by Granville Sharp( )

1 edition published in 1776 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The author and campaigner Granville Sharp (1735-1813) was born in Durham to a religious family. In 1765, a chance encounter with a slave, Jonathan Strong, sparked the serious interest in abolitionism that in due course saw him become a founding member of the London committee of the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade. Due in part to his efforts and writings, the anti-slavery movement in Britain gained public attention and became a more focused and organised campaign. This tract, originally published in 1776, is one of several anti-slavery works that Sharp produced in that year. A rigorous defence of liberty and of 'the honour of holy Scriptures', it is a riposte to the idea that slavery is sanctioned by God, citing the biblical doctrines of 'Thou shalt not oppress a stranger' and 'Love thy neighbour as thyself'. Also included are several appendices of material relating to the abolitionist cause
William Dillwyn copy of letter to John Mehelm by William Dillwyn( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Handwritten copy of letter from William Dillwyn to John Mehelm, dated Burlington, Feb. 16, 1774, giving an account of the letter from Dr. Chandler to Stephen Crane, giving Chandler's view of the bill before the New Jersey Assembly "for the equitable manumission of slaves in New Jersey." Dillwyn then responds to his arguments; unlike Chandler, he thinks slaves are not inherently vicious or lazy, that importation from Africa should stop, that black people are not better off under slavery, etc
Anthony Benezet collection by Anthony Benezet( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Collection of letters, letter extracts, and an article, relating to the transatlantic slave trade, and the enslavement of African peoples in the British colonies. Correspondents include: Daniel Burton, secretary of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, Granville Sharp, William Dillwyn, Benjamin West, and Charlotte, Queen of Great Britain
Papers by Scattergood family( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Scrapbook of Mary (McCollin) Scattergood, containing illustrations and portraits of Biblical and Quaker subjects, famous people and places; scrapbook (1681-1903) of Alfred G. Scattergood containing letters (includes letters of Thomas Scattergood (1668-1745) to his son Joseph), marriage certificates and other documents of Scattergood and related families, as well as facsimiles, broadsides and other papers related to Quakers; misc. family papers include marriage certificates, photographs, poetry, etc
William Dillwyn diary by William Dillwyn( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Diary of a trading voyage from Burlington and Philadelphia to Charleston, South Carolina from 23 October 1772 and 18 January 1773 by William Dillwyn, an American-born Quaker who returned to England in 1774. Entries discuss his social and business activities, his attendance at Quaker meetings, and visits to estates of Thomas Smith and the Middleton family. Includes list of goods taken to sell, list of passengers, etc. Negative photostat
Papers by Gulielma M Howland( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Chiefly correspondence between members of related Quaker families of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware (Allinson, Cox, Dillwyn, Emlen, Hill, Hilles, Howland, Logan, Moore, Morris, Smith and others). Also includes journals, poetry, portraits, legal and business papers. Letters chiefly discuss family, friends, health, spiritual matters and travel. Much of the correspondence is between Quaker women: letters (1821-1859) of Margaret H. Hilles to her mother and sister discuss family, child rearing and health concerns, includes "Account of a Philadelphia Infant School in 1827"; letters (1758-1811) of Margaret Hill Morris to her sister and daughter are concerned with family and health (includes 1793 yellow fever epidemic); also letters (1784-1818) of Gulielma M. Smith, chiefly to her mother, Margaret Hill Morris; letters (1777-1778) of Hannah Moore to her sister; letters (1790-1802) of Hannah Griffitts to Margaret Morris discuss friendship, religious thoughts, family, friends and health concerns
Thomas Clarkson letters and article by Thomas Clarkson( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Letters to William Dillwyn and Alexander Alison, and article by Rev. Thomas Clarkson, regarding his anti-slavery and anti-slave trade efforts in Great Britain. Letter to Mademoiselle Williams, regarding arrangements for a trip to Paris
Richard Peters (1780-1848) letters by Richard Peters( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Four letters from Richard Peters in Philadelphia to Samuel M. Hopkins, William Dillwyn (accompanied by Dillwyn's response), Richard S. Coxe, and Henry C. Carey, dated from 1805 to 1835. Topics include publishing a collection of decisions of the Admiralty Court of Pennsylvania, contributions to the American Convention for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and the copyright lawsuit against Peters brought by Henry Wheaton
Brief considerations on slavery, and the expediency of its abolition : with some hints on the means whereby it may be gradually effected by William Dillwyn( Book )

1 edition published in 1773 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Brief considerations on slavery, and the expediency of its abolition. with some hints on ... the means whereby it may be gradually effected. re by WILLIAM DILLWYN( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Languages
English (83)