WorldCat Identities

Nichol, James P.

Overview
Works: 152 works in 480 publications in 1 language and 5,658 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by James P Nichol
Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia : political developments and implications for U.S. interests by James P Nichol( Book )

53 editions published between 2001 and 2012 in English and held by 323 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The United States recognized the independence of all the former Soviet republics by the end of 1991, including the South Caucasus states of Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia. The United States has fostered these states' ties with the West, including membership in the Organization on Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and NATO's Partnership for Peace (PFP), in part to end the dependence of these states on Russia for trade and security. The United States pursued close ties with Armenia to encourage its democratization. Close ties with Georgia have evolved from U.S. contacts with former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze, Georgia's president. Growing U.S. private investment in Azerbaijan's oil resources have strengthened U.S. interests there. The United States has been active in diplomatic efforts to end conflicts in the region, many of which remain unresolved. Faced with calls in Congress and elsewhere that the Administration develop policies for assisting the Eurasian states of the former Soviet Union, then-President Bush proposed the Freedom Support Act in early 1992. Signed into law in 1992, P.L. 102-511 authorized funds for the Eurasian states for humanitarian needs, democratization, creation of market economies, trade, and investment. Sec. 907 of the Act prohibited most U.S. government-to-government aid to Azerbaijan until it ceases blockades and other offensive use of force against Armenia. This provision was partly altered over the years to permit humanitarian, democratization, border security, and customs aid; Trade and Development Agency aid; OPIC insurance; Eximbank financing; and other commercial activities. The current Bush Administration appealed for a national security waiver of the prohibition on aid to Azerbaijan because of Azerbaijan's assistance to the international coalition to combat terrorism. In Dec 2001, Congress approved foreign appropriations for FY2002 that authorizes the President to waive Sec. 907 through Dec 2002
Central Asia's new states : political developments and implications for U.S. interests by James P Nichol( Book )

24 editions published between 1994 and 2003 in English and held by 298 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics and established diplomatic relations with each by mid-March 1992. The United States also supported their admission to the Organization on Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) and other Western organizations, and elicited Turkish support in countering Iranian influence in the region. Congress was at the forefront in urging the formation of coherent U.S. policies for aiding these and other Eurasian states of the former Soviet Union, and approved the Freedom Support Act and other legislation for this purpose. After the terrorist attacks on America on September 11, 2001, all the Central Asian states offered overflight and other support to coalition anti-terrorist efforts in Afghanistan. Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan have hosted coalition troops and provided access to airbases. Since then, the United States has boosted its security assistance throughout the region for anti-terrorism, counter-narcotics, non-proliferation, border and customs, and defense cooperation programs, while also increasing aid for democratization and free market reforms. U.S. policy goals in Central Asia include fostering stability, democratization, free market economies, free trade and transport throughout the Eurasian corridor, denuclearization in the non-Russian states, and adherence to international human rights standards. An over-arching U.S. priority is to discourage attempts by extremist regimes and groups to block or subvert progress toward these goals. Administration policy also aims to integrate these states into the international community so that they follow responsible security and other policies, and to discourage xenophobic and anti-Western orientations that threaten peace and stability. The Administration is concerned about human rights and civil liberties problems in all the states
Diplomacy in the former Soviet Republics by James P Nichol( Book )

7 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 238 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kyrgyzstan : basic facts by James P Nichol( Book )

11 editions published between 1992 and 1995 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nation by Nation.com, a service of MultiEducator, Inc., presents basic facts about Kyrgyzstan. These facts cover such topics as the geography, government, and history of the country
Azerbaijan : basic facts by James P Nichol( Book )

11 editions published between 1992 and 1996 in English and held by 189 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nation by Nation.com, a service of MultiEducator, Inc., presents basic facts about Azerbaijan. These facts cover such topics as the geography, government, and history of the country
Kazakhstan : basic facts by James P Nichol( Book )

9 editions published between 1992 and 1995 in English and held by 143 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nation by Nation.com, a service of MultiEducator, Inc., presents basic facts about Kazakhstan. These facts cover such topics as the geography, government, and history of the country
Turkmenistan : basic facts by James P Nichol( Book )

8 editions published between 1992 and 1995 in English and held by 142 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nation by Nation.com, a service of MultiEducator, Inc., presents basic facts about Turkmenistan. These facts cover such topics as the geography, government, and history of the country
Uzbekistan : basic facts by James P Nichol( Book )

9 editions published between 1993 and 1996 in English and held by 132 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Stalin's crimes against the non-Russian nations : the 1987-1990 revelations and debate by James P Nichol( Book )

7 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 91 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Crime in Russia : situation update by James P Nichol( Book )

6 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 89 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Central Asia : regional developments and implications for U.S. interests by James P Nichol( Book )

28 editions published between 2003 and 2014 in English and held by 86 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the United States recognized the independence of all the former Central Asian republics, supported their admission into Western organizations, and elicited Turkish support to counter Iranian influence in the region. Congress was at the forefront in urging the formation of coherent U.S. policies for aiding these and other Eurasian states of the former Soviet Union. Soon after the terrorist attacks on America on September 11, 2001, all the Central Asian states offered overflight and other support to coalition anti-terrorist efforts in Afghanistan. Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan hosted coalition troops and provided access to airbases. In 2003, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan endorsed coalition military action in Iraq, and Kazakhstan provided about two dozen troops for rebuilding. After September 11, U.S. policy emphasized bolstering the security of the Central Asian states to help them combat terrorism, proliferation, and arms trafficking. Other strategic U.S. objectives include promoting democratization, free markets, human rights, and energy development. Administration policy also aims to integrate these states into the international community so that they follow responsible security and other policies, and to discourage the growth of xenophobic, fundamentalist, and anti-Western orientations that threaten peace and stability. The Administration's diverse goals in Central Asia reflect the differing characteristics of these states. Some observers call for different emphases or levels of U.S. involvement in the region. There are differing views on whether to strengthen or weaken conditions linking aid to progress in improving human rights and making adequate progress in democratization and the creation of free markets. There is debate regarding the importance of energy resources in the region to U.S. national security
Georgia--current issues and historical background( Book )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 80 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Russia's religion law : assessments and implications by James P Nichol( Book )

5 editions published between 1997 and 1998 in English and held by 76 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Central Asia's security : issues and implications for U.S. interests by James P Nichol( Book )

14 editions published between 1999 and 2010 in English and held by 67 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Central Asian states (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan) face common security challenges from crime, corruption, terrorism, and faltering commitments to economic and democratic reforms. Security in the region is likely in the near term to vary by country, since cooperation among them remains halting. Kyrgyzstan s and Tajikistan s futures are most clouded by ethnic and regional tensions, and corruption in Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan could spoil benefits from the development of their ample energy resources. Authoritarianism and poverty in Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan could contribute to succession crises. Kyrgyzstan s emerging civil society may help the relatively small nation to safeguard its independence, and Turkmenistan s ethnic homogeneity could put it in good stead, but both contain fractious regions and clans. Uzbekistan could become a regional power able to take the lead on policy issues common to Central Asia and to resist undue influence from more powerful outside powers, because of its large territory and population (57 million) and energy and other resources. However, tensions between Uzbekistan and other Central Asian states stymy regional cooperation
Kirghiz Republic : basic facts by James P Nichol( Book )

3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Soviet emigration and travel law : assessments and implications for U.S. interests by James P Nichol( Book )

3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kazakh Republic : basic facts by James P Nichol( Book )

3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bringing peace to Chechnya? : assessments and implications by James P Nichol( Book )

7 editions published between 2004 and 2006 in English and held by 48 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Russia's then-Premier (and current President) Vladimir Putin ordered military, police, and security forces to enter the breakaway Chechnya region in September 1999, and these forces occupied most of the region by early 2000. The conflict has resulted in thousands of military and civilian casualties and the massive destruction of housing and infrastructure. Putin's rise to power and continuing popularity have been tied at least partly to his perceived ability to prosecute this conflict successfully. In the run-up to Russian legislative elections in December 2003 and a presidential election in March 2004, Putin endeavored to demonstrate that peace had returned to the region."--Page 2
Uzbekistan : recent developments and U.S. interests by James P Nichol( Book )

8 editions published between 2005 and 2010 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Uzbekistan is a potential Central Asian regional power by virtue of its relatively large population, energy and other resources, and location in the heart of the region. However, it has failed to make progress in economic and political reforms, and many observers criticize its human rights record. This report discusses U.S. policy and assistance and basic facts and biographical information are provided
Kazakhstan: Recent Developments and U.S. Interests by James P Nichol( Book )

4 editions published between 2006 and 2012 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report examines Kyrgyzstan's uneven political and economic reform efforts. It discusses U.S. policy and assistance for democratization and other programs. Basic facts and biographical information are provided. This report may be updated. Related products include CRS Report RL33458, Central Asia: Regional Developments and Implications for U.S. Interests, by Jim Nichol
 
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Diplomacy in the former Soviet Republics
Alternative Names
Nichol, James P.

Nichol, Jim.

Languages
English (223)

Covers
Georgia--current issues and historical background