WorldCat Identities

University of Chicago Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Overview
Works: 11 works in 28 publications in 1 language and 2,290 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  History  Conference papers and proceedings  Essays  Sources 
Roles: Degree grantor, Other
Classifications: DS41, 492.05
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by University of Chicago
Journal of Near Eastern studies by University of Chicago( )

in English and held by 2,025 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Organization of power : aspects of bureaucracy in the ancient Near East by McGuire Gibson( Book )

5 editions published between 1987 and 1991 in English and held by 254 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Arts & the public by Saul Bellow( Book )

1 edition published in 1967 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On an Egyptian/Asiatic frontier : an archaeological history of the Wadi Tumilat by Carol Ann Redmount( Book )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The fortress of Dorginarti and Lower Nubia during the seventh to fifth centuries B.C. by Lisa Ann Heidorn( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mortality, monuments and mobility : ancestor traditions and the transcendence of space by Anne Porter( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This view enlarges upon traditional interpretations founded on the premise that mortuary practices are a direct reflection of social organization, where variation equals status representation, in the recognition that social ideologies as well as attitudes to life and death also play a part in mortuary behavior. Ancestor traditions provide a key to unlocking the processes of urbanization and state formation along the Euphrates river valley, Syria, in the third millennium BC, and point to the socio-economic system from which this derived. In some places ancestor traditions were part of a complex dynamic of representations of the social group in relation to place, expressed in the physical containment of ancestors in monumental and visible burial mounds
The decline and fall of the Western Zhou dynasty : a historical, archaeological, and geographical study of China from the tenth to the eight centuries B.C. by Feng Li( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

On an Egyptian/Asiatic frontier : an archaeological history of the wadi Tumilat by Carol Ann Redmount( )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The suffix conjugation of Early Egyptian as evidenced in the "Underworld Books" by Andrew J Baumann( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The suffix conjugation of early Egyptian is described by use of five of the ancient Egyptian "Underworld Books," illustrated texts found mainly in the royal tombs of the New Kingdom and describing the sun-god's nightly journey through the nether regions of the earth. In contrast with many textual corpora that have been utilized in the study of Egyptian grammar--which tend to consist of collections of texts of potentially diverse origins--the Underworld Books are particularly well-suited to the purposes of grammatical analysis in that, as a genre, they are unusually unified (each having been composed as a whole), they are exceptionally long (ensuring an ample number of examples and a broad range of syntactic constructions), and they moreover contain illustrated scenes which facilitate their translation. A grammatical study of these texts may help to settle the debate regarding their date of composition and original function, since there is good evidence that they are much older than their first occurrence in the New Kingdom royal tombs and were not originally intended for use as royal funerary literature. The methodological approach is fundamentally an inductive one: the tense of each form is determined by its context and its function inferred from its paradigmatic (substitutional) relationship with other forms and sentence patterns. Like most recent discussions of Egyptian grammar, the dissertation operates within the parameters of Polotsky's transpositional theory of the verb, which holds that most, if not all, forms of the Egyptian suffix conjugation represent conversions of the verb into one of three parts of speech: noun, adverb, or adjective. Simultaneously, the grammatical analysis is influenced by current trends in the field of Egyptian linguistics, incorporates recent contributions to this field, and also serves as a vehicle for criticisms of these contributions. Because all forms of the suffix conjugation arguably express one of three inherent tenses (past, present, or future), and the suffix conjugation is thus fundamentally a tripartite tense system, the material is organized primarily according to tense
Abu Hamid al-Ghazali's juristic doctrine in al-Mustasfa min 'ilm al-usul with a translation of volume one of al-Mustasfa min 'ilm al-usul by Aḥmad Zakī Manṣūr Ḥammād( Book )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityUniversity of Chicago

Chicago, University Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Chicago. University. Dept. of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Department of Near Easter Languages and Civilizations University of Chicago.

University of Chicago Department of oriental languages and civilizations

University of Chicago Department of oriental languages and literatures

University of Chicago. Dept. of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Languages
English (28)