WorldCat Identities

Combs-Orme, Terri

Overview
Works: 11 works in 34 publications in 1 language and 1,354 library holdings
Genres: Bibliographies  Academic theses  Case studies 
Roles: Author, htt
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Terri Combs-Orme
Multiple regression with discrete dependent variables by John G Orme( )

18 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 822 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Most social work researchers are familiar with linear regression techniques, which are fairly straightforward to conduct, interpret, and present. However, linear regression is not appropriate for discrete dependent variables, and social work research frequently employs these variables, focusing on outcomes such as placement in foster care or not; level of severity of elder abuse or depression symptoms; or number of reoffenses by juvenile delinquents in the year following adjudication." "This book presents detailed discussions of regression models that are appropriate for a variety of discrete dependent variables. The major challenges of such analyses lie in the non-linear relationships between independent and dependent variables, and particularly in interpreting and presenting findings. Clear language guides the reader briefly through each step of the analysis, using SPSS and result presentation to enhance understanding of the important link function." "The book begins with a brief review of linear regression; next, the authors cover basic binary logistic regression, which provides a foundation for the other techniques. In particular, comprehension of the link function is vital in order to later interpret these methods' results. Though the book assumes a basic understanding of linear regression, reviews and definitions throughout provide useful reminders of important terms and their meaning, and throughout the book the authors provide detailed examples based on their own data."--Jacket
Social work practice in maternal and child health by Terri Combs-Orme( Book )

3 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 417 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Outcome-informed evidence-based practice by John G Orme( Book )

3 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 97 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lifespan by Terri Combs-Orme( )

in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mortality in alcoholics by Terri Combs-Orme( )

3 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Multiple Regression with Discrete Dependent Variables. Pocket Guides to Social Work Research Methods( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Most social work researchers are familiar with linear regression techniques, which are fairly straightforward to conduct, interpret, and present. However, linear regression is not appropriate for discrete dependent variables, and social work research frequently employs these variables, focusing on outcomes such as placement in foster care or not; level of severity of elder abuse or depression symptoms; or number of reoffenses by juvenile delinquents in the year following adjudication. This book presents detailed discussions of regression models that are appropriate for a variety of discrete dependent variables. The major challenges of such analyses lie in the non-linear relationships between independent and dependent variables, and particularly in interpreting and presenting findings. Clear language guides the reader briefly through each step of the analysis, using SPSS and result presentation to enhance understanding of the important link function. The book begins with a brief review of linear regression; next, the authors cover basic binary logistic regression, which provides a foundation for the other techniques. In particular, comprehension of the link function is vital in order to later interpret these methods' results. Though the book assumes a basic understanding of linear regression, reviews and definitions throughout provide useful reminders of important terms and their meaning, and throughout the book the authors provide detailed examples based on their own data, which readers may work through by accessing the data and output on companion website. Social work and other social sciences faculty, students, and researchers who already have a basic understanding of linear regression but are not as familiar with the regression analysis of discrete dependent variables will find this straightforward pocket guide to be a terrific boon to their bookshelves
Parenting Perceptions of Low-Income Mothers( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to gain understanding of perceptions of low-income pregnant women and mothers about parenting. Study Design and Methods: Participants were 65 low-income, primarily African American, women in their 20s and 30s who were recruited from a faith-based social service center in Memphis, Tennessee. Interviews were conducted by nursing, social work, and psychology students. The existential phenomenological method was used to analyze verbatim responses of participants to vignettes depicting parenting behaviors of hypothetical mothers. Results: Five global themes were identified: (a) Focus on baby's development: "Because I'm the Mother, I'm the First Teacher"; (b) Focus on baby's safety/security: "The Baby Could Be Hurt"; (c) Focus on conveying love: "She Just Wants the Baby to Feel Her Love"; (d) Focus on learning the rules of good childcare: "It's Important to Know the Do's and Don'ts"; and (e) Focus on doing it differently (better) than parents did: "When You Know Better, You Do Better." Clinical Implications: Findings suggest that these mothers care deeply about providing a better life for their children than the life they have had. They desire to learn about being the best parents they can be. As nurses, we can help to provide educational opportunities for mothers through a variety of evidence-based interventions delivered across the childbearing years
A deep breathing intervention for stress reduction in 5-year-old children by Tara Jean Veerman( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This multi-manuscript dissertation concentrates on child stress, an important area of attention for social workers. Many children we work with are exposed to chronic stressors such as poverty, child maltreatment, and other forms of stressors and/or trauma. These experiences can be damaging to a child's development, especially if they occur early in life, and the effects may be long-lasting. The first manuscript provides an overview of the human stress response and its potential deleterious effects on child brain development. It highlights specific brain regions affected by stress, and possible physical and mental health consequences of stress later in life.Building on this knowledge, and acknowledging the importance of the biological underpinnings of stress, the second manuscript examines the ways in which physiological stress is being measured in school-based intervention research. 20 studies that used physiological measures of stress, over the last ten years, identified the following physiological stress measures: salivary cortisol (11 studies), serum cortisol (1 study), heart rate (4 studies), ambulatory heart rate (2 studies), heart rate variability (2 studies), resting blood pressure (3 studies), ambulatory blood pressure (3 studies), sodium handling (2 studies), alpha amylase (1 study), and skin conductance (1 study). I discuss each biological measure, its role in the human stress response, sensitivity to intervention effects and feasibility issues of each measure in a school setting.The third manuscript presents results of a deep breathing intervention for stress reduction in 5-year-old children using a multiple-baseline across individuals design. Five children in pre-kindergarten or kindergarten received a 5-minute deep breathing intervention daily for four weeks. Salivary cortisol, pulse rate and a perceived stress faces scale were used to measure stress. Although results were inconclusive, I found that deep breathing may be beneficial for stress reduction in some children and five-year-olds are able to participate in a deep breathing intervention. A scripted deep-breathing protocol is presented and limitations for stress measurement with young children and barriers to intervention delivery in a school setting are discussed
Effects of prenatal stress and poverty on fetal growth by Teresa Anne Lefmann( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Background. Prenatal stress has negative effects on the developing fetus through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Programming of the stress response system during gestation has lifelong effects that put the infant at risk for multiple stress-related pathologies. Populations most vulnerable to prenatal stress are African-Americans and individuals of low socioeconomic status. Methods. The Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) research project, a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and individual state health departments, was utilized for this study. Tennessee data from 2009 were compiled from individual birth certificates and PRAMS questionnaire responses to examine three constructs: fetal development, stressful life events, and poverty in order to examine the influence of maternal stressors and poverty on fetal development. Results. Latent class analysis revealed two classes of mothers with quantitative and qualitative differences in stressful life events, but class membership was not a significant predictor of problematic birth outcomes. The number of stressors was only a significant predictor of having an infant small for gestational age when moderated by Medicaid status. Medicaid status proved to be a significant predictor of all four measures of fetal growth. The relationship between race and problematic birth overall was moderated by age, with young African-American mothers less likely than European-Americans and older African-American mothers to have problematic births. Conclusion. Stressors, as measured in the field of social work through life events and daily hassles, could potentially be inadequate measures. Further examination of prenatal stress measures is needed
Mediation and moderation of intergenerational epigenetic effects of trauma by Stefanie Renee Pilkay( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Trauma and early-life stress have been linked to poor mental and physical health outcomes. In fact, research has identified trauma and stress can influence epigenetic marks on genes that can alter gene activity. It is suspected that epigenetically altered gene activity is involved in behavior and mental health. This may help explain why some individuals don't experience great benefit from treatment for the effects of stress, and severe mental health symptoms can be chronic for decades or a lifetime. Moreover, some trauma-related mental health symptoms have shown generational patterns that appear linked to epigenetic marks. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the potential inter-generational influence of mother's trauma history and mental health on her offspring's DNA methylation and gene expression in umbilical cord blood. Standardized measures were used to assess mother's trauma history and cumulative experienced fear (TLEQ), as well as mother's mental health status during pregnancy (BSI). Genome-wide and candidate gene analyses were conducted after standard quality control data cleaning procedures. Batch and chip adjustments were made using the Combat package in R software, and the False Discovery Rate was employed to control for multiple comparisons. Results indicate mother's exposure to trauma in childhood predicts DNA methylation and gene expression in offspring. Additionally, mother's mental health status during pregnancy significantly predicts differential gene expression on 245 genes in males only. Finally, mother's fear completely mediates the influence of trauma on her mental health functioning. In conclusion, a mother's traumatic experience has potential to influence gene regulation in her offspring. Most importantly, mother's mental health during pregnancy appears to exert a great influence on gene regulation in males compared to female offspring
Measuring effort to interview and track mothers of newborns by Elizabeth E Wilson( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Maintaining a longitudinal sample is methodologically important to the integrity of research conclusions. The amount of effort devoted to retaining samples varies across research studies. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the effort needed to interview and track longitudinal respondents and the respondents' demographic characteristics, their collateral information, and various measures of the respondents' stability. The sample consisted of 246 mothers of newborns who were interviewed twice over 6 to 12 months as a part of the Volunteer Infant Parent Study. By using eight variables and latent class analysis, mothers of newborns were categorized into three mutually exclusive interview and tracking effort (ITE) groups. The three groups consisted of 149 easy-to-interview and track women, 54 difficult-to-track women who required more telephone calls and 43 difficult-to-track women who required more unscheduled home visits. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine what demographic characteristics, collateral characteristics, and stability measures were associated with each ITE group membership
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.31 (from 0.26 for Multiple r ... to 0.95 for A deep bre ...)

Multiple regression with discrete dependent variables
Covers
Outcome-informed evidence-based practice
Alternative Names
Combs-Orme, Terri

Orme Terri Combs-

Languages
English (34)