WorldCat Identities

Snelson, Franklin F.

Overview
Works: 16 works in 23 publications in 1 language and 365 library holdings
Genres: Classification  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Thesis advisor, Editor, Other
Classifications: QL638.P73, 597.5
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Franklin F Snelson
Ecology and evolution of livebearing fishes (Poeciliidae)( Book )

5 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 299 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Systematics of the subgenus Lythrurus, genus Notropis (Pisces: Cyprinidae) by Franklin F Snelson( Book )

4 editions published between 1970 and 1972 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A new species of Semotilus (Pisces, Cyprinidae) from the Carolinas by Franklin F Snelson( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

*Ecology and evolution of livebearing fishes (Poeciliidae) /edited by Gary K. Meffe and Franklin F. Snelson, Jr( Book )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study of a diverse coastal ecosystem on the Atlantic coast of Florida : annual report, July 72-June 73 by Haven C Sweet( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring space transportation systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center by Franklin F Snelson( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A continuation of base-line studies for environmentally monitoring space transportation systems (STS) at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Sailfin Molly reproduction study by Franklin F Snelson( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Population structure and reproduction in the introduced Florida population of the pike killifish, Belonesox belizanus (Pisces: Poeciliidae) by James S Turner( )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The pike killifish, Belonesox belizanus Kner, is the largest member of the live-bearing family Poeciliidae. The species is native to Central America, and was introduced into Dade County, Florida in 1957. B. belizanus is primarily piscivorous, and has been identified as a potential ecological "problem" species for Florida due to its heavy predation on small native fishes, especially the mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis). The population structure and reproduction of the Florida population were investigated in this study from field samples and aquarium observations. The mean standard length (SL) of mature females was about 103 mm. Most females larger than 75 mm SL contained yolked developing ova, fertilized eggs, or embryos. Mature males averaged about 72 mm SL, and the majority of males larger than 55 mm SL were mature. The sex ratio of mature fish was significantly skewed in favor of females, while immature fish did not differ significantly from a 1:1 sex ratio. The average brood size of field-caught females was about 99, and there was a significant positive correlation of brood size with size of the parent female. The gross morphology of embryological development was described. Although mature unfertilized eggs, abnormal embryos, and degenerating embryos from a previous brood were found at a low frequency in broods of normal embryos, no evidence of superfetation was found. Sizes and weights of embryos and neonates were the largest reported for the family. There was a significant decrease in mean embryo weight as development proceeded, indicating that developing embryos received little or no nutrient input from the maternal system after fertilization. The average interbrood interval of aquarium-held females was 42 days, and females were capable of storing viable sperm. Field-caught females were capable of year-round reproduction. Laboratory-born neonates were immediately piscivorous, and exhibited distinctive behaviors associated with filling of the swim bladder and with avoiding detection by predators. Comparisons of the reproductive patterns of B. belizanus with other members of the family Poeciliidae are discussed
The influence of somatic investment on the pattern of reproduction in Poecilia latipinna (Pisces : Poeciliidae) by Jeffrey D Wetherington( )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In Poecilia latipinna size-specific reproductive and survivorship patterns were correlated with changes in habitat availability. Of the numerous physical, chemical, and biological parameters associated with a reduction in available habitat, probably the most important was reduced food availability. Large (old) females, theoretically with a low reproductive value, allocated energy to reproduction regardless of habitat and, presumably, food availability. When reproductive activities were initiated in March, habitat availability was modest. In association with a severe reduction in available habitat in April, large females were subject to a substantial loss of body weight during the yolk-loading phase of the reproductive cycle. This loss, primarily of somatic tissue, was very costly and heavy mortality ensued. Habitat availability increased during late May and June and survivorship increased. By August the somatic condition of large females had improved significantly. As in April, yolk-leading resulted in a loss of body weight; however, the loss consisted of approximately 70% lipid. Although the cost was lower than April, the necessity of subsidizing reproduction with somatic tissue may account for the slight reduction in survivorship observed in September. Smaller (younger) females, theoretically with a higher reproductive value, allocated energy to reproduction in response to increases in habitat, and presumably food availability. This response was in the form of an increased number of small reproducing females and was not evident until the month following the increase in available habitat. In contrast to large females, reproductive activities among small females were initiated in April. In association with a severe reduction in habitat availability, small females were subject to a loss of dry weight during yolk-loading, which consisted of approximately 44% lipid. The cost of reproduction was reduced and survivorship improved relative to the large females. Despite an increase in available habitat in June, small females curtailed reproduction in favor of survival and increased fecundity afforded by a greater body size. By early August an increase in reproductive activities was evident among small females. The somatic condition of these females was significantly improved in comparison to April females. In contrast to large August females, small females did not subsidize reproduction with somatic tissue. The change in body weight was attributable to a loss of lipid. By early September the available habitat had increased dramatically. In comparison to August, the high number of small reproducing females suggested the response to improved conditions may be rapid. Changes in food availability and, thus the total energy budget (lower in spring, higher in the summer and fall) and the associated cost of reproduction (higher in spring, lower in fall) from April to September were not reflected by changes in fecundity. It appeared that under the conditions that prevailed during this study, a female that made a commitment to reproduction produced a size-specific brood of a fixed quality regardless of food availability and reproduction cost. If a female was able to assimilate excess energy during the gestation period, that energy was allocated in maintenance (i.e. repaying any somatic debt) and growth
The effect of food on reproduction in the sailfin molly, poecilia latipinna (poeciliidae) by Rebecca Bolt Smith( )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sailfin molly populations often experience a midsummer slump in reproduction, and it has been suggested that this slump is caused by food shortage. A food supplementation experiment on a natural population of mollies was done in 1983. Excess food did not directly affect the fecundity of females in the field. A laboratory experiment was designed to determine the food level on reproduction in females. Ration had the greatest effect on somatic condition and growth, indirectly influencing fecundity. Two explanations for this strategy are suggested. A significant difference in brood size and size of young was observed between the field and lab broods at all ration levels. The possibility of plasticity being an integral component of the sailfin molly⁰́₉s life history strategy is discussed
Reproductive life history of the Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina (Pisces, Dasyatidae), in the freshwater St. Johns River, Florida by Michael R Johnson( )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A population of the Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina, resides in the freshwater St. Johns River system, Florida. The reproductive life history of the species in Lake Monroe near Sanford, Florida, was studied from November 1990 to January 1992. No major differences in reproductive timing or performance were noted between this freshwater population and marine populations studied elsewhere in Florida. Females matured at approximately 22 cm disk width (DW), and mature ovarian eggs were ovulated in early April. Embryos were obtained from pregnant females from 15 May to 17 July, and parturition occurred in late July, when embryos attained approximately 100 mm DW. Males matured at approximately 21 cm DW. Male gonadosomatic index peaked in November and declined continually through the spring, but fluid was retained in the seminal vesicles until May. This population experienced total reproductive failure during the 1991/1992 season. Extremely low conductivity in the lake during the fall and winter of 1991 is suggested as a possible stressor
Reproductive life history of the Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina (Pisces: Dasyatidae), in the freshwater St. Johns River, Florida by Michael R Johnson( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Life history tactics of the sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna) in contrasting environments by Helen L Large( )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Life history tactics of three Central Florida populations of Poecilia latipinna were compared to those predicted by life history selection theory. The three populations were sampled monthly for one year. At each sampling period a series of physicochemical measurements were taken to determine the degree of spatial and temporal environmental heterogeneity within each site. Life history traits determined for each population included size at maturity, size specific fecundity, reproductive effort, and length, weight, and condition of offspring. The population inhabiting the most variable environment was characterized by smaller size at maturity, lower size specific fecundity, lower overall reproductive output, and larger, more robust young. In all cases reproductive effort decreased with increasing female length, although the exact nature of this relationship varied between sites. The observed life history tactics do not fit the hypotheses of bet hedging or r-and K- selection theory, but support the idea that life history traits may vary independently rather than being inherited as coadapted units
Summer-season populations of epibenthic marine fishes : in the Indian River lagoon system, Florida by Timothy James Mulligan( )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Epibenthic marine fish populations were sampled in order to establish quantitative base-line data for use in long term monitoring of the northern Indian River lagoon system, Florida. Fish samples were taken by trawling monthly at 8 fixed stations from June through September, 1979 and 1980. Fifty-seven fish species representing 29 families were collected. The fish community was numerically dominated by a very few species. Anchoa mitchilli alone accounted for 87% of the 105,853 individuals collected. Abundance, domin ance, and species diversity were compared among the three lagoon subdivisions, Mosquito Lagoon, Indian River, and Banana River. Greater numbers of fishes were collected in the Indian River, while the highest diversity levels were in the Banana River. Although most species were collected in all three subareas, gross inequities occurred in the numbers of individuals taken. For example, Mosquito Lagoon produced significantly more Micropogonias undulatus and Leiostomus xanthurus than either the Indian or Banana rivers. Significantly more Syngnathus scovelli and Anchoa mitchilli were collected in the Indian River than in the Banana River, and the Banana River produced significantly more Lagodon rhomboides than the Indian River. The only measured environmental parameters that appeared to play significant roles in determining fish populations were vegetative cover and salinity. An importance value (IV) index, combining relative abundance, relative frequency of capture, and relative size (biomass) per individual, was calculated for each species in the community. Dominance ranking by IV has advantages over dominance ranking by relative abundance alone and is calculable for making comparisons in a long-term monitoring study
Population structure, reproduction and laboratory behavior of the introduced Belonesox belizanus (Poeciliidae) in Florida by James S Turner( )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Seasonal Maturation and Growth of Males in a Natural Population of Poecilia latipinna by Franklin F Snelson( )

1 edition published in 1984 in Undetermined and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Languages
English (22)