WorldCat Identities

Druger, Marvin

Overview
Works: 20 works in 47 publications in 1 language and 2,717 library holdings
Genres: Juvenile works  Poetry  Academic theses  Abstracts  Fiction  Outlines and syllabi 
Roles: Editor, Author
Classifications: Q183.3.A1, 507.11073
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Marvin Druger
 
Most widely held works by Marvin Druger
Explore the world using protozoa by O. Roger Anderson( )

13 editions published between 1997 and 2000 in English and held by 1,800 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Teaching tips : innovations in undergraduate science instruction( Book )

4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 253 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Science for the fun of it : a guide to informal science education by Marvin Druger( Book )

4 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 146 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Grade level: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, k, p, e, i, s
Practical perspectives on science education by Marvin Druger( )

5 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 145 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Individualized biology by Marvin Druger( Book )

3 editions published between 1971 and 1989 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Strange creatures and other poems by Marvin Druger( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Strange Creatures and Other Poems is Druger's look at everyday experiences in a new way
Even stranger creatures & other poems by Marvin Druger( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Selection and body size in Drosophila pseudoobscura at different temperatures by Marvin Druger( )

2 editions published in 1961 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mr. Money and the Lucky Chicken by Marvin Druger( Book )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An illustrated tale about a wealthy, greedy old man who is transformed into a philanthropist by his new wife and a lucky chicken
Introduction to biological principles laboratory exercises by Marvin Druger( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mr. Moocho and the lucky chicken by Marvin Druger( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Sad, unlucky Mr. Moocho finds happiness after sharing his new found lucky chickens
Individualized biology units 1-13 and script 9 by Marvin Druger( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Biology units 14-18 by Marvin Druger( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Insulin injection site selection and cognitive factors associated with diabetes mellitus in children by Timothy Elwood Rickabaugh( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purposes of this dissertation were to: examine the effect of pre-exercise insulin injection site on post-exercise blood glucose (BG) concentration in children with insulin dependent diabetes (IDDM) (physiological component); and, to explore the knowledge and attitudes related to diabetes mellitus (DM) and exercise guidelines of selected children with IDDM, parents of IDDM children, and physical education (PE) teachers (survey component). In the physiological component, 14 normally active IDDM children (8 male, 6 female) completed 2 treadmill exercise bouts (30 minutes at 65% of V0 peak) using either an arm or leg insulin injection site prior to exercise. Although exercise prompted significant (<.05) BG reductions over time (60 minutes post-exercise), a 2-way ANOVA indicated that BG values were not significantly different between injection site trials. However, leg injection resulted in 7 cases of post-exercise hypoglycemia as compared to 2 cases of hypoglycemia with arm injection. It was concluded that similar trends in BG concentration are observed for up to 60 minutes post-exercise whether an arm or leg injection site was used, and that the greater incidence of post-exercise hypoglycemia, occurring between 60 to 120 minutes post-exercise following leg injection (as compared to arm injection), may have been due to a difference in insulin receptor mechanics in exercising muscle. In the survey component, 25 IDDM children, 28 parents, and 32 PE teachers completed the 20 item Diabetes & Exercise Knowledge and Attitude Test (DEKAT) along with a brief informational survey of their personal background and IDDM history. Responses to the DEKAT indicated that noticeable knowledge deficits of DM and exercise guidelines were present in all three groups, with overall scores on the knowledge items being 36.0% for IDDM children, 26.4% for parents, and 23.1% for PE teachers. A chi square analysis indicated that there was a significant difference between groups on overall score for the knowledge items and that IDDM children and their parents performed better on level-1 knowledge items (basic concepts) than on level-2 and level-3 items, which required the application of basic DM and exercise concepts to a daily DM management regimen. The DEKAT also uncovered several DM and exercise concepts that appeared to be: well understood; poorly understood: or, in need of resolution by future research
The academic and nonacademic characteristics of science and nonscience majors in Yemeni high schools by Mahyoub Ali Anaam( )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purposes of this study were: (a) to identify the variables associated with selection of majors; (b) to determine the differences between science and nonscience majors in general, and high and low achievers in particular, with respect to attitudes toward science, integrated science process skills, and logical thinking abilities; and (c) to determine if a significant relationship exists between students' majors and their personality types and learning styles. Data were gathered from 188 twelfth grade male and female high school students in Yemen, who enrolled in science (45 males and 47 females) and art and literature (47 males and 49 females) tracks. Data were collected by the following instruments: Past math and science achievement (data source taken from school records), Kolb's Learning Styles Inventory (1985), Integrated Science Process Skills Test, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Attitude Toward Science in School Assessment, Group Assessment of Logical Thinking, Yemeni High School Students Questionnaire. The Logistic Regression Model and the Linear Discriminant Analysis identified several variables that are associated with selection of majors. Moreover, some of the characteristics of science and nonscience majors that were revealed by these models include the following: Science majors seem to have higher degrees of curiosity in science, high interest in science at high school level, high tendency to believe that their majors will help them to find a potential job in the future, and have had higher achievement in science subjects, and have rated their math teachers higher than did nonscience majors. In contrast, nonscience majors seem to have higher degrees of curiosity in nonscience subjects, higher interest in science at elementary school, higher anxiety during science lessons than did science majors. In addition, General Linear Models allow that science majors generally demonstrate more positive attitudes towards science than do nonscience majors and they outperform nonscience majors on integrated science process skills and logical thinking abilities. High achievers in science majors have a significantly higher attitude toward science, higher integrated science process skills, and higher logical thinking abilities than high and low achievers in nonscience majors. No gender differences were found on these variables. Chi-Square tests indicate that no significant relationships exist between students' majors and their personality types and learning styles. However, it was found that majority of students prefer extroversion over introversion, sensing over intuition, thinking over feeling, and judging over perceiving. Moreover, the most common learning styles among science and nonscience majors were the divergent and the assimilative learning styles. Finally, the educational implication of these findings were discussed and future research that need to be conducted were proposed
Student and instructor perceptions of teaching and the impact of learning styles on these perceptions by George Walter Allen( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This research compared college student perceptions about teaching with their teaching assistants' self-perceptions about their own teaching. How these perceptions changed over time, and the effect of student and instructor learning style matches on these perceptions was also examined. This data was collected in a large introductory biology class using a combination of student evaluations, TA self-evaluations, and student interviews. To ascertain learning style preferences, the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory was also administered to the students and the TAs. Student perceptions and TA self-perceptions held relatively stable over the semester, showing neither convergence nor divergence. Students perceived the TAs as being better at classroom management and teaching than the TAs perceived themselves. TAs perceived themselves as being better in areas of dealing with students on the individual level than the students did. These effects were especially pronounced for inexperienced TAs. Learning style similarities between students and TAs had little effect on how these two sets of perceptions changed over the semester. The students whose perceptions most closely match their TA's perceptions shared no MBTI traits with them. Students who had completely dissimilar MBTI profiles from their TA evaluated their TA as being better than students who had the same MBTI profile as their TA. The results of this study suggest easily implemented methods to improve student learning in and satisfaction with their courses, especially in larger introductory science courses involving TAs. The results also suggest ways of improving TA training
College student perceptions of science teachers and the effect on science teaching as a career path by Michael George Cost( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Past research documented that student perceptions of scientists constituted a stereotypical image that had a negative effect on the students' attitudes towards science and resulted in low numbers of students studying to become scientists and engineers in college. The present study paralleled the research on student perceptions of scientists to investigate to what extent student perceptions of science teachers affect their willingness to consider science teaching as a career. This was accomplished by surveying 91 college students and 25 science teachers at the beginning, middle, and end of the collegiate career path of becoming a science teacher. Each survey contained quantitative data utilizing seven-point semantic differential scales and written open response questions. In-depth interviews with two members of each level were conducted to supplement the survey data. The study found that college students begin college with a positive perception of teaching as a career and highly rank teachers, especially science teachers, as having a positive influence on their career path. The qualities of job enjoyment, job stability, and helping others that are characteristic of teaching were also found to be of high importance. Perceptions of the personal, social, professional, and career qualities of a science teacher were found to differ from a scientist. While both science teachers and scientists were found to be responsible, persistent, and productive, science teachers were perceived as being a distinct career possessing qualities that make them more personable, sociable, and wise than scientists. Some gender differences were detected but there was no evidence of gender bias affecting students choosing a career path to science teaching. Science teachers were perceived to be very supportive of females pursuing scientific career paths. The study also found evidence that some introductory level college students steer away from science teaching because of low salary, the lack of promotion, and the efforts of influential people including science teachers. The study calls for departments of science education to take a more active role in the recruitment of new science teachers and the improvement of undergraduate science education
 
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Teaching tips : innovations in undergraduate science instruction
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Teaching tips : innovations in undergraduate science instructionPractical perspectives on science education
Languages
English (47)