WorldCat Identities

Reagan, Joey

Overview
Works: 9 works in 21 publications in 1 language and 159 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks and manuals  Academic theses 
Roles: Author
Classifications: P91.3, 001.4
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Joey Reagan
Applied research methods for mass communicators by Joey Reagan( Book )

5 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 110 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Applications of research to media industries( Book )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Communication research primer : measuring and evaluating organizational communication by Joey Reagan( Book )

5 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Media exposure and community integration as predictors of political activity by Joey Reagan( )

5 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using Grunig's "Indices for Models of Public Relations" to Differentiate Job Functions within Organizations by Joey Reagan( Book )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study was conducted to determine the function of a firm within the context of public relations practice. The assessment of James E. Grunig's "Indices for Models of Public Relations" (an instrument for measuring the type of public relations practiced by an organization) was of primary concern. This instrument places public relations practice into four models: (1) one-way asymmetrical primarily serves propaganda purposes; (2) one-way symmetrical provides dissemination of information; (3) two-way asymmetrical attempts to persuade; and (4) two-way symmetrical tries to develop mutual understanding. A sampling of 136 public relations practitioners from the state of Washington responded to the 16-item "Indices" questionnaire in order to describe their job. Results indicated there is no significant relation between the one-way scales and the two-way scales and an inability to clearly distinguish job functions. This information indicates that the "Indices" may not be able to distinguish among the four types of organizations. These "Indices," however, are clearly useful in distinguishing between the two types (one-way or two-way) of public relations organizations. The low explained variance and the low loadings on two items suggest that a more fully developed scale may be more useful. A larger number of items may not only increase the reliabilities, but they may also increase the differentiation among the four models. (Four tables of data are included; 10 notes and a copy of the "Indices" and a Job Function List are attached.) (Mg)
Community Integration, Media Use and Political Activity by Joey Reagan( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study examined data from 1,828 adults in 17 cities in the United States to test a model of how community integration (sense of community) and use of media affected voting and other political participation. The portion of the model dealing with mass media included the new concept "quasi-mass media," which involves more personalized types of communication that still maintain standardized forms of content and distribution (such as public access cable television, trade magazines, professional journals, newsletters, church bulletins, and specialized newspapers). A linear structural relations (lisrel) analysis of the data revealed that (1) length of residence, education, use of print mass media, and use of quasi-mass media were positive predictors of voting; (2) use of electronic mass media was a negative predictor of voting; (3) use of print mass media, use of quasi-mass media, and community integration were positive predictors of political participation; and (4) length of residence and use of quasi-mass media were positive predictors of community integration, while use of electronic mass media was a negative predictor of community integration. Overall, the study illustrated the importance of specifying a process model of communication effects, and demonstrated the value of the concept of quasi-mass media. (Rl)
Quasi-Mass Media as Community Communication Channels by Joey Reagan( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Quasi-mass media," refers to a type of communication and communication media that lies between mass media and interpersonal communication. This paper defines quasi-mass communication in terms of its messages, how it is generated, and audience membership, and discusses its uses in promoting political and community development, information flow, and decision making. The paper suggests quasi-mass media as a possible solution to problems related to the limited usefulness and accessibility of mass media and as a means of resolving the debate over elitist versus pluralist control of community government in the United States. A list of references is included, along with suggestions for further research for areas of possible assessment. (Mai)
Apples and Oranges The Credibility of Local Television and Newspaper News Sources by Jayne W Zenaty( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Telephone surveys were conducted in Detroit and Grand Rapids, Michigan, to assess both the relative credibility of news presentations by the local news media and respondents' reasons for using these media. The results supported previous research on local news credibility, suggesting that television was the more believable medium, even in a local context. Although similar instruments were used in both cities, differences between Detroit and Grand Rapids credibility data suggested that cross-city comparisons may not always be valid. Different reasons for using media were found in the two cities, suggesting that future research in media credibility should consider the effects of media environment, life-cycle position, community size, and community structure on media use before considering credibility. The lack of perceived conflict in news presentation between local television and newspapers suggested that hypothetical conflict situations may not be valid assessments of credibility. (Author/RL)
Sources for State Government News by Rick Ducey( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study was conducted to assess the sources used by a metropolitan population for news about state government. Telephone interviews were conducted with 714 adult subjects in a metropolitan area in Michigan. Subjects were asked how much time they spent reading newspapers and watching television, how interested they were in state government, and their main source for news about state government, as well as demographic questions. The results indicated that the subjects viewed television an average of three hours and read newspapers an average of 52 minutes each day. Forty-seven percent of the subjects said they were interested in state government news, and 42% said they were somewhat interested. The majority, 59%, got their state news from television, while only 33% read newspapers for their state news. Heavier newspaper readers were more likely than lighter readers to be interested in state government news, while there was no difference in interest between lighter and heavier television viewers. (Hth)
 
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Audience level: 0.55 (from 0.51 for Applied re ... to 0.84 for Quasi-Mass ...)

Applied research methods for mass communicators
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English (21)