WorldCat Identities

Hoeppel, Ronald E.

Overview
Works: 23 works in 48 publications in 1 language and 649 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ronald E Hoeppel
Bioremediation of recalcitrant organics( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 174 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wastewater treatment on soils of low permeability : interim report by Ronald E Hoeppel( Book )

5 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 100 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The study was limited to land treatment as a means of achieving advanced wastewater purification. Land treatment has the advantage of incorporating the recycling concept directly into its treatment mode, resulting in replacement rather than depletion of natural resources. Also, some form of control over ecologically damaging components is retained. This report presents results of a literature review on various methods of treating wastewater on land and also presents results of model tests of the overland flow method, with particular emphasis on nitrification and denitrification. Two types of soil systems for overland flow treatment of wastewater were investigated during these model tests. One soil was from an 8-year-old commercial cannery wastewater treatment site. The other was from an untreated natural site in a national forest that was low in indigenous soil organic matter; consequently, this latter system was amended with sludge in order to increase its organic matter content. Thus, both experimental soils represented soil systems that had more organic matter and biological activity than an average heavy clay soil
Long-term effectiveness of capping in isolating Dutch Kills sediment from biota and overlying water by James M Brannon( Book )

3 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 85 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effectiveness of capping in isolating Dutch Kills sediment from biota and the overlying water by James M Brannon( Book )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 85 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Confined disposal area effluent and leachate control : laboratory and field investigations : final report by Kenneth Y Chen( Book )

2 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Feasibility of the functional use of vegetation to filter, dewater, and remove contaminants from dredged material : final report by Charles R Lee( Book )

4 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An assessment was made of the feasibility of using vegetation to filter, dewater, and remove contaminants from dredged material slurry in confined disposal sites. A summary was developed to provide a listing of plant species that might be propagated on disposal areas. It was concluded that the physical and chemical interactions of selected vegetation with dredged material slurry will improve the quality of discharge water from containment areas. Significant amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus could be removed from discharged waters by use of selected vegetation. The use of vegetation to remove large amounts of heavy metal contaminants from dredged material has limited feasibility. The intolerance of some plants to certain contaminants may preclude their usefulness in dredge material disposal operations. The use of selected vegetation of dewater and consolidate fine-textured dredged material is feasible. The presence of vegetation will improve the appearances of confined disposal areas. The practicality of establishing and using vegetation will depend on the planned future use of disposal areas or the dredged material contained therein
Physical and chemical characterization of dredged material influents and effluents in confined land disposal areas by Ronald E Hoeppel( Book )

4 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Preface -- List of figures -- Conversion factors, U.S. customary to metric (SI) units of measurement -- Part I: Introduction ; Background ; Dredged material composition and modes of dredging and disposal ; Previous confined disposal area studies ; Vegetation interactions ; Objectives of the study -- Part II: literature review ; Introduction ; Interactions of sediments with chemical constituents ; Sources of contaminants ; Biological activity ; Regulation of contaminant mobility ; Organic matter ; Chlorinated hydrocarbon transformations ; Petroleum hydrocarbons ; Sorption reactions by sediments ; Iron compounds in oxidized sediments ; Element scavenging by iron oxides ; Sulfide compounds in reduced sediments ; Carbonate complexes -- Interactions of chemical species in the water column ; Contaminant mobility at the sediment-water interface ; Manganese dilemma ; Ammonium and phosphate release ; Suspended solids interactions ; Colloid flocculation -- Part III: experimental methods ; Disposal area locations and descriptions ; Field sampling procedures ; Sample collection ; Field measurements ; Laboratory procedures ; Sample preparation ; Sample extraction, digestion, and analysis ; Geochemical phase partitioning analysis ; Particle size fractionation of effluent solids ; Standard elutriate test procedures ; Methods of data evaluation -- Part IV: results and discussion ; General characteristics of disposal areas ; Physical and chemical characteristics of influents, effluents and background water ; General trends ; Salinity, conductivity, temperature dissolved oxygen and pH ; Solids, particle size distribution, and cation exchange capacity ; Chlorinated pesticides and PCB's ; Sulfides and deposals area sediment Eh ; Organic carbon and oil and grease ; Nitrogen ; Phosphorus ; Calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chloride, and alkalinity ; Iron and Manganese ; Zinc and copper ; Cadmium and lead ; Nickel, vanadium, chromium, and titanium, Mercury and arsenic ; Geochemical phase partitioning of influent and effluent solids ; General information ; Total metals ; Exchangeable phase ;Carbonate phase ; Easily reducible phase ; Organic-sulfide phase and acid digests ; Summary ; Site specific studies ; Particle size fractionation of effluent solids- Seattle site ; Relation of dredged material texture and solids content to contaminant release -- Richmond site ; Disposal area vegetation -- dredged material -- interactions -- Southport site ; Assessment of the standard elutriate test for land containment areas- Seattle site -- Part V: Major findings and conclusions and recommendations ; Major finding and conclusions ; Influent and effluent characterizations ; Effluent and surface background water characterizations ; Recommendations -- References -- Tables 1-16 ; Photos 1-20 ; Appendix A: dredging logs -- Tables A1-A6 ; Appendix B: field and analytical laboratory data ; Tables B1-B19
Effectiveness of capping in isolating contaminated dredged material from biota and the overlying water by James M Brannon( Book )

4 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effectiveness of capping in chemically and biologically isolating contaminated dredged material was investigated using large- (250 pound) and small- (22.6 pound) scale laboratory reactor units. The ability of various cap materials to isolate contaminated dredged material was assessed in the large reactor units by following the movement of chemical contaminants and microbial spores contained in the capped dredged material into the overlying water column and by monitoring the biological uptake of chemical contaminants by clams and polychaetes. The depth of cap material needed to chemically isolate contaminated dredged material was assessed in the small-scale reactor units. Changes in overlying water concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), ammonium nitrogen manganese, and orthophosphate were monitored following isolation of the water column from air by placing a 4-cm layer of mineral oil on the surface. The constituents analyzed were selected due to their mobility under anaerobic conditions, ease of measurement, and generally high concentrations in contaminated dredged material compared to clean cap materials
Nitrogen transformations in wetland soils : interim report by Ronald E Hoeppel( Book )

5 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nitrogen transformation pathways often become complex in soils that are periodically subjected to submergence. Both biochemical and chemical mechanisms can be implicated in these transformations. Nitrate accumulation in the environment has caused much concern recently due to its buildup in animals lacking the ability to reduce it. Young infants and many ruminant animals lack nitrate-reducing enzymes, and eventually this may lead to respiration difficulties. However, nitrate, or intermediates leading to its formation, must first be present in order to remove considerable excesses of combined nitrogen from the soil. The report discusses these processes in Wetlands
Feasibility of transplantation, revegetation, and restoration of eelgrass in San Diego Bay, California by Charles G Boone( Book )

2 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of several methods of eelgrass (Zostera marine L.) transplantation, restoration, and revegetation in San Diego Bay, California. A literature survey was conducted and current state-of-the-art eelgrass transplant methodologies are presented. Two transplant methods are recommended; however, since neither of these has been tested in a large-scale field program, a preliminary pilot transplant study is also recommended. Transplantation costs for each method have been estimated and are also presented
Fate and enumeration problems of fecal coliform bacteria in runoff waters from terrestrial ecosystems : final report by Ronald E Hoeppel( Book )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Field and greenhouse model tests were conducted, using both natural wastewater or tracer fecal coliform bacteria as overland flow system inocula. Greenhouse models contained soils previously uncontaminated or contaminated by human versus cattle fecal wastes: application rates were varied to determine best treatment conditions. The fecal coliform (M-FC) test isolates were identified to determine their origin, fate, and enumeration problems. Modifications to the standard method for fecal coliform testing were conducted to develop improved testing methodology. Escherichia coli was considered the best indicator bacterium for assessing recent fecal pollution and disease potential of overland runoff. The e. coli plate counts were highest in effluent runoff during the hot summer and above-freezing fall period. Enumeration problems of E. coli were less severe during the cool weather because of great reductions in interfering bacteria on test plates at this time. Field and greenhouse observations indicated that the continuously treated plots provided better conditions for protozoan predation of fecal bacteria and also for the development of a surface organic layer on the plots that aided in the removal of wastewater bacteria through filtration and entrapment
Confined disposal area effluent and leachate control : (laboratory and field investigations) by Kenneth Y Chen( Book )

3 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report summarizes the findings of five work units concerned with the impact of dredged material disposal in confined land disposal areas. Three of the work units dealt with active disposal operations at 11 sites; impact was assessed by comparing the quality of influents and effluents at each site with background surface receiving water. Two work units are discussed which evaluated the impact of confined disposal area leachates on groundwaters. The leachate studies included laboratory column elutions (3- to 9-month period) of each of five types of dredged material overlying one of two different soils; four of the 11 field sites were also monitored for changes in leachate and groundwater quality (four onsite, four offsite monitoring, and two offsite background sampling locations at each site) in a 9-month study. The field sites included freshwater (riverrine and lake) and brackish water (estuarine and ship channel) dredging environments located in geographical areas where contamination problems were anticipated. The dredged material and environmental features varied greatly at the different sites. It is suggested that guidelines for evaluation of potential disposal sites be developed in a stepwise progression that will not require complete execution of the total program to determine site suitability. A short discussion of evaluatory scheme is included
Long-term effectiveness of capping in isolating Dutch Kills sediment from biota and the overlying water( Book )

2 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effectiveness of capping in chemically and biologically isolating contaminated dredged material over a 1-year period was investigated using large (250-l) laboratory reactor units. The ability of Edgewater cap material to isolate contaminated Dutch Kills sediment was assessed by following the movement of chemical contaminants and microbial spores contained in the Dutch Kills sediment into the water columnand by monitoring the biological uptake of chemical contaminants by the clam, Mercenaria mercenaria. At the conclusion of the year study, sediment cores were obtained from the experimental units and analyzed for chemical contaminants to determine if contaminant movement into the cap had occurred. Results of water column, animal bioaccumulation, and core sampling indicate that capping of contaminated Dutch Kills sediment with either 10 or 50 cm of clean cap material will prevent the movement of detectable amounts of contaminants through the cap material. It is highly that the greatest value of a cap is in physically isolating contaminated dredged material from the overlying water and biota. In the absence of bioturbation or physical disturbance, core data revealed that the cap maintained its integrity over the course of a year without mixing with the contaminated sediment. Addition of a 10 cm Edgewater cap, along with a suitable thickness of material to isolate burrowing benthic organisms from the dredged material and prevent current and wave action from removing the cap, should prevent movement of contaminants into the water and biota in the field
Bioremediation of recalcitrant organics( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Determination of chemical threshold concentrations using 2,4-D to control selected aquatic macrophytes--a pilot study to evaluate a laboratory system by Howard E Westerdahl( )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Capping Contaminated Dredged Material( Book )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Capping contaminated dredged material with clean material to reduce the ecological impact of dredged material disposal in open water has been utilized by the New England and New York Districts. Monitoring of capped disposal sites has shown that capping is technically feasible and that the caps are stable under normal tidal and wave conditions (O'Connor and O'Connor 1983; Science Applications, Inc. 1982). Bioaccumulation studies conducted in the field have been inconclusive as to the ability of capping to prevent contaminant uptake by organisms (O'Connor and O'Connor 1983). In the New York Bight, a mussel bioaccumulation study at the capping site showed low body burdens which could have been due to bioconcentration of contaminant for ambient water as much as from the nearby sediments (O'Connor and O'Connor 1983). In Long Island Sound, mussels were also suspended in the water column at the sand and silt capped sites of the Stanford-Norwalk capping project. Concentrations of Co, Cu, HG, Zn, and V fluctuated in the mussels over time, but these changes were thought to be unrelated to the caps because no differences in spatial concentration were detected (Morton and Kemp 1980). Determining the ability of caps to isolate contaminated dredged material from the water column has, therefore, proven to be a difficult field problem (Morton and Kemp 1980; O'Connor and O'Connor 1983). Contaminants that organisms encounter and bioaccumulate in the water column can originate from many sources other than dredged material
The 2,4-D threshold concentrations for control of Eurasian watermilfoil and Sago pondweed by Jerry F Hall( )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. Effectiveness of Capping in Isolating Dutch Kills Sediment from Biota and the Overlying Water( Book )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The effectiveness of capping in chemically and biologically isolating contaminated dredged material was investigated using laboratory reactor units. The ability of Buttermilk Channel cap materials to isolate contaminated dredged material was assessed in the large reactor units by following the movement of chemical contaminants and microbial spores contained in the capped dredged material into the overlying water column and by monitoring the biological uptake of chemical contaminants by clams and polychaetes. The depth of cap material needed to chemically isolate contaminated dredged material was assessed in small-scale reactor units. Changes in overlying water concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), ammonium nitrogen, manganese, and orthophosphate were monitored following isolation of the water column from air by placing a 4-cm layer of mineral oil on the surface. The constituents analyzed were selected due to their mobility under anaerobic conditions, ease of measurement, and generally high concentrations in contaminated dredged material compared to clean cap materials
Highlights of research on overland flow for advanced treatment of wastewater : final report( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Overland flow treatment of municipal wastewater was studied in greenhouse grass-soil models. The response of overland flow treatment of nitrogen, phosphorus, and heavy metals to various operating conditions was determined. Nitrogen removal from applied wastewater was exceptionally efficient, with best removal being obtained whenever the applied wastewater was allowed sufficient time to interact with the components of the overland flow system. Sufficient time for adequate treatment of wastewater could be obtained by increasing the application period from 6 to 18 hr, by decreasing the amount of applied wastewater from 1 to 1/2 in./acre, by decreasing the slope of application surface from 8 to 2 percent, or by combinations thereof. Greater than 90 percent nitrogen and heavy metal removal could be obtained during overland flow treatment. Generally, 80 percent of the applied phosphorus was removed with overland flow treatment. Up to 98 percent phosphorus removal could be obtained by addition of stoichiometric amounts of aluminum sulfate to the wastewater prior to land treatment. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and heavy metals were found to accumulate on the soil surface in the organic mat with little movement into lower soil depths. Heavy metals accumulated on the soil surface nearest the point of wastewater application. Elevated levels of heavy metals were correspondingly found in the grass harvested nearest the point of wastewater application. The results of this modeling study indicate that overland flow is a feasible method for treating municipal wastewater to achieve a tertiary level of water quality. (Author)
Capping contaminated dredged material by James M Brannon( )

1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Bioremediation of recalcitrant organics
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English (45)