WorldCat Identities

Venables, Anthony

Overview
Works: 277 works in 1,036 publications in 3 languages and 9,923 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: HF1025, 330.9
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Anthony Venables
The spatial economy : cities, regions and international trade by Masahisa Fujita( Book )

37 editions published between 1999 and 2014 in English and Spanish and held by 775 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The authors show how seemingly disparate models reflect a few basic themes, and in so doing they develop a common "grammar" for discussing a variety of issues. They show how a common approach that emphasizes the three-way interaction among increasing returns, transportation costs, and the movement of productive factors can be applied to a wide range of issues in urban, regional, and international economics
Multinational firms in the world economy by Giorgio Barba Navaretti( Book )

22 editions published between 2004 and 2006 in English and Italian and held by 634 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"With the contribution of other leading experts, Giorgio Barba Navaretti and Anthony Venables assess the determinants of multinationals' actions, investigating why their activity has expanded so rapidly and why some countries have seen more such activity than others. They analyze their effects on countries that are recipients of inward investments, and on those countries that see multinational firms moving jobs abroad. The arguments are made using modern advances in economic analysis, a case study, and by drawing on the extensive empirical literature that assesses the determinants and consequences of activity by multinationals. The treatment is rigorous, yet accessible to all readers with a background in economics, whether students or professionals. Drawing out policy implications, the authors conclude that multinational enterprises are generally a force for the promotion of prosperity in the world economy."--BOOK JACKET
European integration : trade and industry by L. Alan Winters( Book )

21 editions published between 1991 and 2010 in English and held by 423 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A contribution to our understanding of the effects of the completion of the European internal market in 1992
Plundered nations? : successes and failures in natural resource extraction by Paul Collier( Book )

8 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 377 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The study of natural resource extraction in resource-rich countries often shows that plunder, rather than prosperity, has become the norm. Management of natural resources differs widely in every state; a close examination of the decision-making chains in various states highlights the key principles that need to be followed to avoid distortion and dependence. This book consists of eight case studies investigating the political economy of the decision chain, revealing where various states have met with success, or failed disastrously. This original research provides a unique insight into how different countries have handled their resource extraction. This book is essential reading for students, researchers and policy makers working across development economics and natural resource economics."--Provided by publisher
Spatial inequality and development by S. M. Ravi Kanbur( Book )

18 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 230 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This is an introduction to spatial and regional inequality. Drawing on data from 25 countries from around the world, it examines the questions: What exactly is spatial inequality? Why does it matter? And what should be the policy response to it?"--Résumé de l'éditeur
Spatial disparities in human development : perspectives from Asia( Book )

11 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 217 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Spatial disparities are a measure of the unequal distribution of income, wealth, power and resources between peoples in different locations. This book focuses on issues directly related to the Millennium Development Goals including conflict, poverty, and the causes and consequences of inequality. It applies the latest research techniques including regression-based decomposition, poverty decomposition and computable general equilibrium models."--Jacket
The Economics of the Single European Act by George W McKenzie( Book )

14 editions published between 1991 and 1994 in English and held by 195 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Integration, specialization, and adjustment by Paul R Krugman( Book )

25 editions published between 1992 and 1994 in English and held by 94 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Globalization and the inequality of nations by Paul R Krugman( Book )

22 editions published between 1994 and 1995 in English and held by 90 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A monopolistically competitive manufacturing sector produces goods used for final consumption and as intermediates. Intermediate usage creates cost and demand linkages between firms and a tendency for manufacturing agglomeration. How does globalization affect the location of manufacturing and gains from trade? At high transport costs all countries have some manufacturing, but when transport costs fall below a critical value a core-periphery pattern spontaneously forms, and nations that find themselves in the periphery suffer a decline in real income. At still lower transport costs there is convergence of real incomes, in which peripheral nations gain and core nations may lose
Geographical Disadvantage A Heckscher-Ohlin-- von Thunen Model of International Specialization by Anthony Venables( )

20 editions published in 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Out from economic centers, though reducing the welfare of closer regions. Where will a new activity, such as assembly of a new product, locate? Remote locations are disadvantaged if the product has high transport intensity (perhaps because of heavy requirements for intermediate inputs). But the costs of remoteness are already incorporated into the factor prices of those regions, which makes them more attractive. Which location is chosen depends, therefore, on how existing activities compare with the new activity in transport intensity and factor intensity. This paper - a product of Trade, Development Research Group - is part of a larger effort in the group to study the location of economic activity. The authors may be contacted at avenables@worldbank.org or ngl4@columbia.edu
Trading arrangements and industrial development by Diego Puga( )

14 editions published between 1996 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 81 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

June 1997 A new approach to analyzing the role of trade in promoting industrial development. How do different trading arrangements influence the industrialization process of developing countries? Can preferential trading arrangements (PTAs) be superior to multilateral liberalization, or at least an alternative when multilateral liberalization proceeds slowly? If so, what form should the PTAs take? Are developing countries better advised to seek PTAs with industrial countries or among themselves? Traditional analysis of these issues has been based on the ideas of trade creation and trade diversion. The problem with this analysis is that it starts from assuming a pattern of comparative advantage. This stands in sharp contrast to the apparently changing comparative advantage of newly industrialized countries. The experience of these countries suggests the need for an analysis in which the pattern of comparative advantage is not set in stone but is potentially flexible, and in which less developed countries can develop and converge in both income and economic structure to industrial economies. Puga and Venables outline an alternative approach for analyzing the role of trade in promoting industrial development. There are few fundamental differences between countries that generate immutable patterns of comparative advantage. Instead the pattern of trade and development in the world economy is determined mainly by history. Cumulative causation has created concentrations of industrial activity in particular locations (industrial countries) and left other areas more dependent on primary activities. Economic development can be thought of as the spread of these concentrations from country to country. Different trading arrangements may have a major impact on this development process. By changing the attractiveness of countries as a base for manufacturing production they can potentially trigger or postpone industrial development. This approach explains why firms are reluctant to move to economies that have lower wages and labor costs, and shows how trade liberalization can change the incentives to become established in developing countries. It provides a mechanism through which import liberalization can have a powerful effect in promoting industrialization. And it suggests that import liberalization may create or amplify differences between liberalizing countries with the possible political tensions this may create. While these features are consistent with the world economy, they fall short of providing convincing empirical support for the approach. Using the approach, the authors derive a number of conclusions about the effects of trade liberalization. First, that unilaterally liberalizing imports of manufactures can promote development of the local manufacturing industry. The mechanism is forward linkages from imported intermediates, but this may be interpreted as part of a wider package of linkages coming from these imports. Second, the gains from liberalization through PTA membership are likely to exceed those obtained from unilateral action. South-South PTAs will be sensitive to the market size of member states, and North-South PTAs seem to offer better prospects for participating Southern economies, if not for North and excluded countries. Third, the effects of particular schemes (such as the division of benefits between Southern economies) will depend on the characteristics of the countries and cross-country differences in these characteristics. This paper-a product of the International Trade Division, International Economics Department-was prepared for the research project on regional integration
The seamless world : a spatial model of international specialization by Paul R Krugman( Book )

19 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 80 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper is an effort to do international trade theory without mentioning countries. Nearly all models of the international economy assume that trade takes place between nations or regions which are themselves dimensionless points. We develop a model in which economic space is instead assumed to be continuous, and in which this 'seamless world' spontaneously organizes itself into industrial and agricultural zones because of the tension between forces of agglomeration and disagglomeration. One might expect such a model to be analytically intractable, but we are able to gain considerable insight through a combination of simulations and an analytical approach originally suggested in a biological context by Alan Turing
The theory of endowment, intra-industry, and multinational trade by James R Markusen( Book )

22 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 80 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We consider a trade model combining a 2x2x2 Heckscher-Ohlin structure, monopolistic competition, transport costs, and multinational corporations. We demonstrate how the mix of national and multinational firms that operate in equilibrium depends on technology and on the division of the world endowment between countries. Multinationals are more likely to exist the more similar are countries in both relative and absolute endowments. Where multinationals exist they reduce the volume of trade and raise world welfare (although not necessarily that of both countries). They also reduce the agglomeration forces that arise when international factor mobility is allowed
Foreign direct investment as a catalyst for industrial development by James R Markusen( Book )

12 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How does an FDI project affect local firms in the same industry? Competition in the" product and factor markets tends to reduce profits of local firms, but linkage effects to supplier" industries may reduce input costs and raise profits. This paper develops an analytical framework" to assess these effects. Circumstances in which FDI is complementary to local industry are" established, and it is shown how FDI may lead to the establishment of local industrial sectors." These sectors may grow to the point where local production overtakes and forces out FDI plants." Our results are consistent with the experience of a number of industrial sectors in the NICs."
Geography and development by J. Vernon Henderson( )

11 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 67 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Why are some spatial differences in land rents and wages not bid away by firms and individuals in search of low-cost or high-income locations? Why does economic activity cluster in centers of activity? And what are the consequences of remoteness from existing centers?
Infrastructure, Geographical Disadvantage, and Transport Costs by Nuno Limão( )

14 editions published in 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 67 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

December 1999 - The median landlocked country has only 30 percent of the trade volume of the median coastal economy. Halving transport costs increases that trade volume by a factor of five. Improving the standard of infrastructure from that of the bottom quarter of countries to that of the median country increases trade by 50 percent. Improving infrastructure in Sub-Saharan Africa is especially important for increasing African trade. Limão and Venables use three different data sets to investigate how transport depends on geography and infrastructure. Landlocked countries have high transport costs, which can be substantially reduced by improving the quality of their infrastructure and that of transit countries. Analysis of bilateral trade data confirms the importance of infrastructure. Limão and Venables estimate the elasticity of trade flows with regard to transport costs to be high, at about -2.5. This means that: · The median landlocked country has only 30 percent of the trade volume of the median coastal economy. · Halving transport costs increases the volume of trade by a factor of five. · Improving infrastructure from the 75th to the 50th percentile increases trade by 50 percent. Using their results and a basic gravity model to study Sub-Saharan African trade, both internally and with the rest of the world, Limão and Venables find that infrastructure problems largely explain the relatively low levels of African trade. This paper - a product of Trade, Development Research Group - is part of a larger effort in the group to investigate the effects of geography on economic performance. The authors may be contacted at ngl4@columbia.edu or avenables@worldbank.org
Multinational firms and the new trade theory by James R Markusen( Book )

12 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 64 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A model is constructed in which multinational firms may arise endogenously. Multinationals exist in equilibrium when transport and tariff costs are high, incomes are high, and firm-level scale economies are important relative to plant-level scale economies. Less obvious, multinationals are more important in total economic activity when countries are more similar in incomes, relative factor endowments, and technologies. The model may thus be useful in explaining several stylized facts, including (a) the growing importance of direct investment relative to trade among the developed countries over time and (b) the greater ratio of investment to trade among the developed countries relative to this ratio for 'north-south' or 'south-south' economic relationships. The model offers predictions about the volume of trade that contrast with those of the 'new trade theory', predicting that trade at first rises and then falls as countries converge in incomes, relative endowments, and technologies. Welfare is also considered, and it is shown that direct investment makes the smaller (or high cost) country better off, but may make the larger (or low cost) country worse off
Toward a microeconomics of growth by Robin Burgess( )

14 editions published between 2003 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

What drives growth at the microeconomic level? The authors divide the factors that determine a location's growth performance into two groups, "1st advantage" and "2nd advantage." The term 1st advantage refers to the conditions that provide the environment in which new activities can be profitably developed, including most of the factors on which traditional theory has focused, such as access to inputs (labor and capital), access to markets, provision of basic infrastructure, and the institutional environment. The term 2nd advantage refers to factors that increase returns to scale and can lead to cumulative causation processes. They may be acquired by learning, through technological spillovers, or by the development of thick markets of suppliers and local skills. The authors' analysis suggests that empirical investigation of the drivers of growth must shift down to a more microeconomic level. Such an analysis has become more feasible as data at the subnational level have become more available. By viewing recent empirical evidence on drivers of growth through their analytical framework, the authors are able to begin to sketch out a microeconomic agenda for growth. They emphasize that it is the manner in which 1st and 2nd advantages interact that shapes the pattern of development. The authors then turn to the example of how policy has affected manufacturing growth performance in India. They analyze links between the direction of state-level labor regulation and growth in the organized manufacturing sector, how state-led expansion of bank branches into rural areas has affected unregistered or informal manufacturing, and how the pre-reform technological capability of industries affected their response to liberalization in 1991. The analysis suggests that policy choices at the local level affect growth. Both theory and empirics need to downshift to the microeconomic level if we are to make advances in identifying specific means of encouraging innovation and growth
Geography and export performance : external market access and internal supply capacity by Stephen Redding( Book )

20 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper investigates the determinants of countries' export performance looking in particular at the role of international product market linkages. We begin with a novel decomposition of the growth in countries' exports into the contribution from increases in external demand and from improved internal supply-side conditions. Building on the results of this decomposition we move on to an econometric analysis of the determinants of export performance. Results include the finding that poor external geography, poor internal geography, and poor institutional quality contribute in approximately equal measure to explaining Sub-Saharan Africa's poor export performance
 
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The spatial economy : cities, regions and international trade
Alternative Names
Anthony Venables British economist and the BP Professor of Economics

Anthony Venables britisk økonom

Anthony Venables Brits econoom

Anthony Venables brittisk ekonom

Vanables, Tony

Venables, A. J.

Venables, A. J. 1953-

Venables, A. J. (Anthony James)

Venables, Anthony J.

Venables, Anthony J. 1953-

Venables, Anthony J. (Anthony James)

Venables, Anthony J. (Anthony James), 1953-

Venables, Anthony James 1953-

Venables, Tony

Venables, Tony 1953-

ベナブルズ, アンソニー・J

Languages
English (328)

Italian (3)

Spanish (1)

Covers
Multinational firms in the world economyEuropean integration : trade and industryPlundered nations? : successes and failures in natural resource extractionSpatial inequality and developmentSpatial disparities in human development : perspectives from AsiaThe Economics of the Single European Act