WorldCat Identities

Hankinson, R. J.

Overview
Works: 51 works in 270 publications in 5 languages and 5,951 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  History  Conference papers and proceedings  Humor  Criticism, interpretation, etc 
Roles: Author, Translator, Editor, Other, Author of introduction, 070
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by R. J Hankinson
The sceptics by Robert J Hankinson( )

42 editions published between 1994 and 2016 in English and held by 1,852 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Cause and explanation in ancient Greek thought by R. J Hankinson( )

34 editions published between 1998 and 2004 in English and Italian and held by 1,665 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

R.J. Hankinson traces the history of ancient Greek thinking about causation and explanation, from its earliest beginnings around 600 BC through to the middle of the first millennium of the Christian era. The ancient Greeks were the first Western civilization to subject the ideas of cause and explanation to rigorous and detailed analysis, and to attempt to construct theories about them on the basis of logic and experience. Hankinson examines the ways in which they dealt with questions about how and why things happen as and when they do, about the basic constitution and structure of things, about function and purpose, laws of nature, chance, coincidence, and responsibility. Such diverse questions are unified by the fact that they are all demands for an account of the world that will render it amenable to prediction and control; they are therefore at the root of both philosophical and scientific enquiry. Hankinson draws on a wide range of original sources, in philosophy, natural sciences, medicine, history, and the law, in order to create a synoptic picture of the growth and development of these central concepts in the Graeco-Roman world
The Cambridge companion to Galen by R.J Hankinson( Book )

23 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 541 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Galen of Pergamum (AD 129?c.216) was the most influential doctor of later antiquity, whose work was to influence medical theory and practice for more than fifteen hundred years. He was a prolific writer on anatomy, physiology, diagnosis and prognosis, pulse-doctrine, pharmacology, therapeutics, and the theory of medicine; but he also wrote extensively on philosophical topics, making original contributions to logic and the philosophy of science, and outlining a scientific epistemology which married a deep respect for empirical adequacy with a commitment to rigorous rational exposition and demonstration. He was also a vigorous polemicist, deeply involved in the doctrinal disputes among the medical schools of his day. This volume offers an introduction to and overview of Galen's achievement in all these fields, while seeking also to evaluate that achievement in the light of the advances made in Galen scholarship over the past thirty years
On Aristotle's "On the heavens 1.10-12" by Simplicius( Book )

23 editions published between 2003 and 2014 in English and held by 411 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In these three chapters of On the Heavens, Aristotle argues that the universe in ungenerated and indestructible. In Simplicius's commentary there is a battle between the Neoplatonist Simplicius and the Aristotelian Alexander, whose lost commentary on Aristotle's On the Heavens Simplicius partly preserves." "Simplicius's rival, the Christian Philoponus, had conducted a parallel battle in his Against Proclus, but had taken the side of Alexander against Proclus and other Platonists, arguing that Plato's Timaeus gives a beginning to the universe. Simplicius takes the Platonist side, denying that Plato intended a beginning. The origin to which Plato refers is, according to Simplicius, not a temporal origin, but the divine cause that produces the world without beginning."--Jacket
Galen on antecedent causes by Claudi Galè( Book )

8 editions published between 1998 and 2004 in English and held by 312 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On Aristotle's "On the heavens 1.1-4" by Simplicio( Book )

22 editions published between 2001 and 2014 in English and held by 295 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In Chapter 1 of On the Heavens, Aristotle defines "body" and then notoriously ruptures dynamics by introducing a fifth element, beyond Plato's four, to explain the rotation of the heavens, which, like nearly all Greeks, Aristotle took to be real, not apparent. Even a member of his school, Xenarchus, we are told, rejected his fifth element. The Neoplatonist Simplicius seeks to harmonize Plato and Aristotle. Plato, he says, thought that the heavens were composed of all four elements but with the purest kind of fire, namely light, predominating. That Plato would not mind this being called a fifth element is shown by his associating with the heavens the fifth of the five convex regular solids recognized by geometry."--Jacket
On the therapeutic method by Galen( Book )

4 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 211 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Simplicius On Aristotle's "On the Heavens 1.5-9" by Simplicius( )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Method, medicine and metaphysics : studies in the philosophy of ancient science by R. J Hankinson( Book )

12 editions published between 1988 and 1998 in English and held by 132 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On Aristotle on the heavens 1.5-9 by Simplicius( Book )

19 editions published between 2002 and 2015 in English and held by 112 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Aristotle argues in On the Heavens 1.5-7 that there can be no infinitely large body, and in 1.8-9 that there cannot be more than one physical world. As a corollary in 1.9, he infers that there is no place, vacuum or time beyond the outermost stars. As one argument in favour of a single world, he argues that his four elements, earth, air, fire and water, have only one natural destination apiece. Moreover they accelerate as they approach it and acceleration cannot be unlimited. However, the Neoplatonist Simplicius, who wrote the commentary translated here in the sixth century AD, tells us that this whole world view was to be rejected by Strato, the third head of Aristotle's school. At the same time, he tells us the different theories of acceleration in Greek philosophy."--Bloomsbury Publishing
On the therapeutic method : books I and II by Claudius Galenus( Book )

16 editions published between 1991 and 2011 in English and held by 74 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On antecedent causes by Claudi Galè( Book )

11 editions published between 1998 and 2004 in 3 languages and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The bluffer's guide to philosophy by Jim Hankinson( Book )

5 editions published between 1999 and 2007 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Simplicius : on Aristotle's "on the heavens 1.1-4"( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In chapter 1 of On the Heavens Aristotle defines body, and then notoriously ruptures dynamics by introducing a fifth element, beyond Plato's four, to explain the rotation of the heavens, which, like nearly all Greeks, Aristotle took to be real, not apparent. Even a member of his school, Xenarchus, we are told, rejected his fifth element. The Neoplatonist Simplicius seeks to harmonise Plato and Aristotle. Plato, he says, thought that the heavens were composed of all four elements but with the purest kind of fire, namely light, predominating. That Plato would not mind this being called a fifth e
Bluff your way in Paris by Jim Hankinson( Book )

5 editions published between 1987 and 1992 in English and Danish and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Alles Bluff? Mitreden beim Thema: Philosophie by Jim Hankinson( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in German and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Of science, skepticism and sophistry : the pseudo-Hippocratic On the art in its philosophical context by Joel Eryn Mann( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Simplicius : on Aristotle on the heavens 1.10-12 by Simplicius( )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the three chapters of On the Heavens dealt with in this volume, Aristotle argues that the universe is ungenerated and indestructible. In Simplicius' commentary, translated here, we see a battle royal between the Neoplatonist Simplicius and the Aristotelian Alexander, whose lost commentary on Aristotle's On the Heavens Simplicius partly preserves. Simplicius' rival, the Christian Philoponushad conducted a parallel battle in his Against Proclus but had taken the side of Alexander against Proclus and other Platonists, arguing that Plato's Timaeus gives a beginning to the universe. Simplicius t
The bluffer's guide to Paris by R. J Hankinson( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Apeiron : a journal for ancient philosophy and science( )

in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Focuses on ancient Greek and Roman philosophy and classical studies
 
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The sceptics
Covers
Cause and explanation in ancient Greek thoughtThe Cambridge companion to GalenOn Aristotle's "On the heavens 1.10-12"Galen on antecedent causesOn Aristotle's "On the heavens 1.1-4"Simplicius On Aristotle's "On the Heavens 1.5-9"On Aristotle on the heavens 1.5-9On antecedent causes
Alternative Names
Hankinson Jim

Hankinson, Jim 1957-

Hankinson, R. J.

Hankinson, R. J. (Robert James)

Hankinson, Robert James

Hankinson, Robert James 1957-

Hankinson, Robert Jim 1957-

Languages
English (228)

German (2)

Danish (1)

Italian (1)

Latin (1)