WorldCat Identities

Mace, G. M. (Georgina M.)

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Most widely held works about G. M Mace
 
Most widely held works by G. M Mace
Conservation in a changing world by Zoological Society of London and Conservation International Symposium( Book )

13 editions published between 1996 and 2009 in English and held by 391 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book will be a source of information for postgraduates, researchers and professionals in conservation biology, wildlife management and ecology
Biotechnology and the conservation of genetic diversity : the proceedings of a symposium held at the Zoological Society of London on 4th and 5th September 1990 by H. D. M Moore( Book )

9 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 310 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Creative conservation : interactive management of wild and captive animals by Peter J. S Olney( Book )

16 editions published between 1993 and 1994 in English and held by 289 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Through contributions from most of the leading experts from around the world, this book presents a full review of the biological, logistic and economic concerns that exist in all efforts to manage populations
1994 IUCN red list of threatened animals by Brian Groombridge( Book )

5 editions published in 1993 in Undetermined and English and held by 117 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lijst van soorten die bedreigd worden met uitsterven en soorten die zeer schaars voorkomen in het wild
Is there a crisis?( Visual )

2 editions published between 2001 and 2003 in English and held by 49 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The most striking feature of life on Earth is its richness and variety. But research shows that the planet's biodiversity is seriously threatened with destruction by human activities. From the depths of the oceans to the tops of rainforest canopies, from the African savannas to the soil underfoot, this program ... reveals the extent of that living bounty -- and the chilling rate at which species are becoming extinct. The research of paleontologist Peter Ward, marine biologist Sylvia Earle, entomologist Terry Erwin, and biologists Sir Robert May, Edward Wilson, and John Lawton is featured."--Http://ffh.films.com
Proposals for future monitoring of British mammals by David W Macdonald( Book )

8 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The evolutionary ecology of small mammals by G. M Mace( )

3 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reviews : a collection of papers( Book )

3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Conservation of exploited species( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Personal perspectives in the life sciences for the Royal Society's 350th anniversary( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Evolution lost : status and trends of the world's vertebrates( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It's time to work together and stop duplicating conservation efforts by G. M Mace( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Preserving the tree of life by G. M Mace( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Towards a risk register for natural capital( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Natural capital is essential for goods and services on which people depend. Yet pressures on the environment mean that natural capital assets are continuing to decline and degrade, putting such benefits at risk. Systematic monitoring of natural assets is a major challenge that could be both unaffordable and unmanageable without a way to focus efforts. Here we introduce a simple approach, based on the commonly used management tool of a risk register, to highlight natural assets whose condition places benefits at risk. We undertake a preliminary assessment using a risk register for natural capital assets in the UK based solely on existing information. The status and trends of natural capital assets are assessed using asset–benefit relationships for ten kinds of benefits (food, fibre (timber), energy, aesthetics, freshwater (quality), recreation, clean air, wildlife, hazard protection and equable climate) across eight broad habitat types in the UK based on three dimensions of natural capital within each of the habitat types (quality, quantity and spatial configuration). We estimate the status and trends of benefits relative to societal targets using existing regulatory limits and policy commitments, and allocate scores of high, medium or low risk to asset–benefit relationships that are both subject to management and of concern. The risk register approach reveals substantial gaps in knowledge about asset–benefit relationships which limit the scope and rigour of the assessment (especially for marine and urban habitats). Nevertheless, we find strong indications that certain assets (in freshwater, mountain, moors and heathland habitats) are at high risk in relation to their ability to sustain certain benefits (especially freshwater, wildlife and climate regulation). Synthesis and applications. With directed data gathering, especially to monitor trends, improve metrics related to asset–benefit relationships, and improve understanding of nonlinearities and thresholds, the natural capital risk register could provide a useful tool. If updated regularly, it could direct monitoring efforts, focus research and protect and manage those natural assets where benefits are at highest risk
Reviews : a collection of papers( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Patterns of mammalian population decline inform conservation action( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Evaluations of wildlife population dynamics have the potential to convey valuable information on the type of pressure affecting a population and could help predict future changes in the population's trajectory. Greater understanding of different patterns of population declines could provide a useful mechanism for assessing decline severity in the wild and identifying those populations that are more likely to exhibit severe declines. We identified 93 incidences of decline within 75 populations of mammalian species using a time‐series analysis method. These included linear, quadratic convex (accelerating) declines, exponential concave (decelerating) declines and quadratic concave declines (representing recovering populations). Excluding linear declines left a data set of 85 declines to model the relationship between each decline‐curve type and a range of biological, anthropogenic and time‐series descriptor explanatory variables. None of the decline‐curve types were spatially or phylogenetically clustered. The only characteristic that could be consistently associated with any curve type was the time at which they were more likely to occur within a time series. Quadratic convex declines were more likely to occur at the start of the time series, while recovering curve shapes (quadratic concave declines) were more likely at the end of the time series. Synthesis and applications . The ability to link certain factors with specific decline dynamics across a number of mammalian populations is useful for management purposes as it provides decision‐makers with potential triggers upon which to base their conservation actions. We propose that the identification of quadratic convex declines could be used as an early‐warning signal of potentially severe decline dynamics. For such a population, increased population monitoring effort should be deployed to diagnose the cause of its decline and avert possible extinctions. Conversely, the presence of a quadratic concave decline suggests that the population has already undergone a period of serious decline but is now in the process of recovery. Such populations will require different types of conservation actions, focussing on enhancing their chances of recovery
Biotechnology and the conservation of genetic diversity : Symposium : Papers( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Partula '94 : an action plan for the conservation of the family Partulidae : report of a workshop held at the Zoological Society of London, 11-13th February 1994 by Partula '94 (Workshop)( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The development of new criteria for listing species on the IUCN red list by G. M Mace( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Conservation in a changing world
Alternative Names
Georgina Mace British ecologist

Mace Georgina

Mace, Georgina M.

乔治娜·梅斯

Languages
English (71)

Covers
Creative conservation : interactive management of wild and captive animalsConservation of exploited species