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National Defense Research Institute (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 927 works in 1,764 publications in 1 language and 148,784 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Handbooks, manuals, etc  History 
Classifications: UB323, 355.2230973
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about National Defense Research Institute (U.S.) Publications about National Defense Research Institute (U.S.)
Publications by National Defense Research Institute (U.S.) Publications by National Defense Research Institute (U.S.)
Most widely held works about National Defense Research Institute (U.S.)
 
Most widely held works by National Defense Research Institute (U.S.)
Military use of drugs not yet approved by the FDA for CW/BW defense lessons from the Gulf War by Richard A Rettig ( )
3 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,710 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The confrontation that began when Iraq invaded Kuwait in August 1990 brought with it the threat that chemical and biological weapons might be used against the more than half a million military personnel the United States deployed to the region. To protect these troops from such threats, the Department of Defense wished to use drugs and vaccines that, not having been tested for use in these specific situations, were considered "investigational" by the federal Food and Drug Administration. This report examines the history of the Interim Rule, adopted in December 21, 1990, that authorized the Commissioner of Food and Drugs to waive informed consent for the use of investigational drugs and vaccines for certain military uses; how this authority was used for pyridostigmine bromide and botulinum toxoid during the Gulf War; and the subsequent controversy surrounding the rule, its application, and its implications. The report then analyzes the issues the Interim Rule raised when investigational drugs are used for such purposes and makes recommendations for dealing with similar situations in the future
Past revolutions, future transformations what can the history of revolutions in military affairs tell us about transforming the U.S. military? by Richard O Hundley ( )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,608 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Advances in technology can bring about dramatic changes in military operations, often termed "revolutions in military affairs" or RMAs. Such technology-driven changes in military operations are not merely a recent phenomenon: they have been occurring since the dawn of history, they will continue to occur in the future, and they will continue to bestow a military advantage on the first nation to develop and use them. Accordingly, it is important to the continued vitality and robustness of the U.S. defense posture for the DoD R & D community to be aware of technology developments that could revolutionize military operations in the future, and for the U.S. military services to be on the lookout for revolutionary ways in which to employ those technologies in warfare. This report examines the history of past RMAs, to see what can be learned from them regarding the challenge confronting the DoD today, when it has set out on a concerted effort to bring about a technology-driven transformation of the U.S. military to achieve the operational goals outlined in Joint Vision 2010. Among its many findings are three of particular note: RMAs are rarely brought about by dominant players (such as the U.S. military is today). For a dominant player to bring about an RMA requires a receptive organizational climate, fostering a continually refined vision of how war may change in the future and encouraging vigorous debate regarding the future of the organization; senior officers with traditional credentials willing to sponsor new ways of doing things and able to establish new promotion pathways for junior officers practicing a new way of war; mechanisms for experimentation, to discover, learn, test and demonstrate new ideas; and ways of responding positively to the results of successful experiments, in terms of doctrinal changes, acquisition programs, and force structure modifications. The DoD has some of these elements today, but is missing others. The report makes specific suggestions regarding ways of filling in the missing elements. Doing these things will facilitate DoD's force transformation activities and help ensure that the next RMA is brought about by the United States. and not some other nation
Attracting college-bound youth into the military toward the development of new recruiting policy options by Beth J Asch ( )
3 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,537 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
One popular program, the Montgomery GI Bill, enrolls large numbers of individuals, but the vast majority of service members use their benefits after separating from service. Thus, the military does not receive the benefits of a more educated and productive workforce, unless the individuals subsequently join a reserve component. The authors suggest the Department of Defense should consider nontraditional policy options to enhance recruitment of college-bound youth. Recruiters could target more thoroughly students on two-year college campuses, or dropouts from two- or four-year colleges. Options for obtaining some college before military service could be expanded by allowing high school seniors to first attend college, paid for by the military, and then enlist. Or the student might serve in a reserve component while in college and then enter an active component after college
A description of U.S. enlisted personnel promotion systems by Stephanie Williamson ( )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,531 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The U.S. armed services have different methods and processes for promoting enlisted personnel. All of the services, however, aim to ensure that promotion outcomes correspond to substantive differences in personnel quality. This report provides a snapshot of how the Army, Navy, Marines, and Air Force go about measuring duty performance, leadership potential, experience, knowledge, and skills to determine who among its enlisted force merits promotion, when they are eligible for promotion, and at what level promotion decisions are made. This report provides an overview of the enlisted promotion system in the 1990s as retention issues again move to the forefront of Defense Department concerns
The emergence of noopolitik toward an American information strategy by John Arquilla ( )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,478 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Weapons, concepts of proportional response, and the need to maintain the immunity of noncombatants. Ultimately, the authors call for an innovative turn of mind as policymakers and strategists rethink how best to adapt to the epochal transformations being wrought by the information revolution
Space emerging options for national power by Dana J Johnson ( )
2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1,465 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report presents the results of a study that examined the extent to which both military and economic spacepower will influence national security strategy and the conduct of future military operations. It attempts to articulate the key military space policy issues facing the United States and place them in the larger context of a changing strategic environment to define new options for the exercise of spacepower in the pursuit of national interests. The proliferation of military space forces from the Cold War to the present can be seen in the increasing capabilities of these forces and the expanding roles they are expected to play in future missions. Space forces will be expected to perform an array of space-related functions, including early warning and integrated tactical warning and attack assessment, weather/environmental monitoring, satellite communications, surveillance and reconnaissance, navigation and positioning, space control, and, possibly, ballistic missile defense and force application
Recent recruiting trends and their implications for models of enlistment supply by Michael P Murray ( )
3 editions published between 1997 and 1999 in English and held by 1,464 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The authors estimate an econometric model of high-quality enlistment supply using geographically disaggregated data from two periods, FY83-87 and FY90-93. They find that econometric models based on data from the earlier period do not predict the recruiting difficulties reported by the military in the 1990s. This conforms to a preliminary assessment provided by Asch and Orvis (MR-549-A/OSD, 1994). The authors also find that econometric models estimated with the 1990s data give altered counsel about the effects of at least some policy variables, most notably the number of recruiters
Command concepts a theory derived from the practice of command and control by Carl H Builder ( )
3 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,464 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The qualities of commanders and their ideas are more important to a general theory of command and control than are the technical and architectural qualities of their computers and communications systems. This theory separates the art of command and control (C2) from the hardware and software systems that support C2. It centers on the idea of a command concept, a commander's vision of a military operation that informs the making of command decisions during that operation. The theory suggests that the essential communications up and down the chain of command can (and should) be limited to disseminating, verifying, or modifying command concepts. The theory also suggests, as an extreme case, that an ideal command concept is one that is so prescient, sound, and fully conveyed to subordinates that it would allow the commander to leave the battlefield before the battle commences, with no adverse effect upon the out-come. This report advances a theory about military command and control. Then, through six historical case studies of modern battles, it explores the implications of the theory both for the professional development of commanders and for the design and evaluation of command and control architectures. The report should be of interest to members of the Joint Staff and the services involved in developing command and control doctrine for the U.S. military, and to all of those interested in the military art and science of command and control
Planning America's security lessons from the National Defense Panel by John E Tedstrom ( )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,457 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report identifies key lessons from the first National Defense Panel (NDP) and makes recommendations to the Congress, the administration, and future NDP management teams about how the process can be made more effective. The NDP was established by the 1996 Military Force Structure Review Act as an independent effort to provide guidance to the Secretary of Defense and the Congress on long-term defense strategies and force structure requirements. This report reviews the motivations for creating the NDP, its administrative and logistical experience, the NDP's relationship to the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), and the final NDP report. Some of the principal recommendations are that (1) the NDP should maintain its focus on defense issues, but do more to integrate its recommendations into the broader national security agenda; (2) future NDPs should be better coordinated with the defense planning cycle (i.e., the next NDP, preceding the next QDR, should complete its work before the new administration comes into office in 2001); and (3) future NDPs should deal more systematically with resource constraints than the first NDP
Innovative management in the DARPA high altitude endurance unmanned aerial vehicle program phase II experience by Jeffrey A Drezner ( )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,446 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The U.S. military's development of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) has been hampered by cost overruns, schedule slippage, and disappointing operational results. The High Altitude Endurance UAV (HAE UAV) joint program, initiated under the direction of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), incorporates several innovative elements in its acquisition strategy that depart radically from traditional acquisition approaches. The program's development phase for the Global Hawk and DarkStar air vehicles is analyzed in this research. The HAE UAV program has experienced problems that are typical of newly implemented methods, but it has produced significant benefits, and provides lessons that could improve a wide variety of future acquisition processes
A review of the scientific literature as it pertains to Gulf War illnesses by Lee H Hilborne ( )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 1,422 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Numerous Gulf War veterans have reported a range of illnesses and symptoms after serving in the Persian Gulf. Some of the reported symptoms are similar to those caused by diseases known to be prevalent in that region. This report discusses these infectious diseases and considers them as potential causes of the symptoms reported by the veterans. The authors present a short summary of etiology, diagnosis, and treatment for several infectious diseases and infectious organisms, including bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. Two biological agents, anthrax and botulinum toxin, are also discussed
Using the force and support costing system an introductory guide and tutorial ( )
3 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 1,421 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Force and Support Costing (FSC) System is a set of models and databases that helps analysts project the cost implications of proposed changes in defense forces, infrastructure, and assets. The user interface and many of the models are implemented in Excel; most of the database resides on a network. The illustrated study projects effects on defense costs arising from the deactivation of an Army division. The FSC system allows the user to view the force structure in the current Army program, select the division to be cut, and specify when the deactivation will occur. The system then translates that deactivation into reductions in personnel and equipment assets, and costs out the implications. In addition to stepping through the specific procedures for the simulation, the authors show other ways the FSC System can be used to analyze the cost effects of various policy actions
Increasing a sense of community in the military the role of personnel support programs by Colette Van Laar ( )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,418 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A universally accepted definition of what a sense of community is remains elusive, but policymakers agree that increasing that sense has tangible benefits for the U.S. military in improvements to commitment, performance, retention, and readiness. This report examines the role of the Defense Department's personnel support programs and focuses on nine tools for increasing sense of community: group symbols, rewards and honors, common external threat, making military membership attractive, group size and individuality, personal influence, personal investment, contact and proximity, and group activities. The report also analyzes which groups would most benefit from programs to increase a sense of community and how to avoid pitfalls when attempting to increase that sense
Married to the military the employment and earnings of military wives compared with those of civilian wives by James R Hosek ( )
3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 1,414 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Today's military is a military of families; many service members are married, and many of their spouses work and contribute to family income. But military wives earn less than civilian wives, and this study seeks to understand why. The authors find that military wives, knowing they are likely to move frequently, are willing to accept jobs that offer a lower wage rather than to use more of their remaining time at a location to find a higher-wage job. Compared with civilian wives, military wives tend to work somewhat less if they have young children but somewhat more if their children are older. The probability that military wives work declines with age, although it changes little with age in the civilian world. This probability declines more rapidly for wives with a college education, most of whom are officers' wives. Although it is often assumed that military families live in rural areas where the job opportunities for wives are poor, the authors found fairly small differences in the location of civilian versus military families. Finally, whereas in the civilian world an increase in the unemployment rate leads to a slight increase in the probability that wives worked during the year and the probability that they worked full-time (responding as "added workers" to the loss or threat of loss of their husbands' work), military wives appear to respond as workers with a more permanent attachment to the labor force
The arsenal ship acquisition process experience contrasting and common impressions from the contractor teams and joint program office by Robert S Leonard ( )
3 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 1,407 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Arsenal Ship acquisition program was unique in two respects: it represented a new operational concept for Navy weapon systems, and its management structure and process represented a significant departure from traditional military ship-building programs. The Arsenal Ship program was, in effect, an experiment; while the Navy envisioned an array of mission capabilities for the ship, it set the project budget as the single immovable requirement. In the end, political and financial constraints caused the program's cancellation. Nevertheless, its acquisition approach and technical innovations have already had--and will continue to have--significant influence on other Navy ship-building programs. The lessons learned from the Arsenal Ship program, applied to existing and planned systems, should more than recover the money spent on it
The European Security and Defense Policy NATO's companion - or competitor? by Robert Edwards Hunter ( )
6 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 1,385 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The European Union's new European Security and Defense Policy (ESDP) is a major step toward full European integration, in parallel with progress toward a Common Foreign and Security Policy. As ESDP develops a rapid reaction force, it can, in time, enable European allies to take military action when NATO--meaning the United States--chooses not to become engaged. But unless done right, ESDP risks weakening the ties of Atlantic Alliance. The United States supports ESDP--but on the basis that it is created within NATO, "separable but not separate" from the Alliance, and drawing mainly on NATO's military assets. In particular, Washington has been concerned that the Europeans will "unnecessarily duplicate" NATO's military capabilities, including the critical function of operational planning; that they will begin developing a "European caucus" within NATO that will detract from the effectiveness of its decisionmaking; and that, in the end, they will not spend enough on defense to make a difference, while competing with NATO. America wants acknowledgment of "NATO first"; the Europeans respond that ESDP must be capable of "autonomous" action but will only act "where NATO as a whole is not engaged." This book tells the story of ESDP's relationship to NATO--and what must be done to ensure that the storehouse of European security is increased and transatlantic cohesion is preserved, especially in the wake of September 11, 2001, and the aftermath
Arms trafficking and Colombia by Kim Cragin ( )
5 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 1,380 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Colombia has experienced significant political instability and violence over the past century due to a number of factors, including the proliferation of small-arms trafficking. The authors identify the sources and routes used by arms traffickers to acquire, buy, sell, receive, transfer, and ship weapons. They also examine the various groups and individuals who purchase and use these munitions. The authors examine Colombia?s political conflict through the lens of small-arms trafficking and conclude with policy implications for the United States
Gaining new military capability an experiment in concept development by J. L Birkler ( )
3 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1,379 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The process of modernizing U.S. military forces is the focus of this report. This process requires reinvigorating concept development efforts, thinking broadly about alternatives, and pursuing concept development before decisions are made about which services, which platforms, or which technologies are best suited for accomplishing current or new military tasks. In February and March 1996, RAND convened a concept options group (COG), which included broadly knowledgeable technologists drawn from a variety of scientific and engineering backgrounds, experienced military operators, and senior analysts and planners. By focusing on two specific military tasks, the COG considered options for using technologies that could enable U.S. forces to perform an existing military mission better, perform it differently, or gain a new capability. This report presents highlights from the COG discussions as well as some suggestions for convening future COGs
A review of the scientific literature as it pertains to Gulf War illnesses by William S Augerson ( )
5 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 1,376 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
That Iraq had already used chemical warfare agents led coalition forces to take protective action. Yet many Gulf War veterans have reported a host of symptoms that could be construed as coming from exposure to chemical or biological weapons. The scientific literature on the effects of exposure to such agents suggests the following: Militarily effective doses of any of the agents reviewed would have produced severe health effectsthat would have required clinical treatment or resulted in death. However, since low-level exposures could have produced mild clinical signs that could have been overlooked or misinterpreted, it is not possible to rule out low-dose exposures to one or several classes of agents or the possibility of some resultant contribution to some of the symptoms Gulf War veterans have experienced. Still, it is difficult to believe that exposures affecting largenumbers of persons would escape clinical recognition. Further, no references in the literature report clinical symptoms developing years after exposure, as was the case in about 50 percent of the health problems Gulf War veterans have reported
A review of the scientific literature as it pertains to Gulf War illnesses by Grant N Marshall ( )
7 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 1,367 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The confrontation that began when Iraq invaded Kuwait in August 1990 brought with it the threat that chemical and biological weapons might be used against the more than half a million military personnel the United States deployed to the region. To protect these troops from such threats, the Department of Defense wished to use drugs and vaccines that, not having been tested for use in these specific situations, were considered "investigational" by the federal Food and Drug Administration. This report examines the history of the Interim Rule, adopted in December 21, 1990, that authorized the Commissioner of Food and Drugs to waive informed consent for the use of investigational drugs and vaccines for certain military uses; how this authority was used for pyridostigmine bromide and botulinum toxoid during the Gulf War; and the subsequent controversy surrounding the rule, its application, and its implications
 
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Alternative Names
N.D.R.I.
NDRI
Rand Corporation. National Defence Research Institute
Rand Corporation. National Defense Research Institute
Rand Corporation. National Research Defense Institute
Rand Corporation. National Security Research Division. National Defense Research Institute
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English (69)
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