WorldCat Identities

Citizens for Kennedy (Organization)

Overview
Works: 47 works in 53 publications in 1 language and 54 library holdings
Genres: Political platforms 
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Citizens for Kennedy (Organization) Publications about Citizens for Kennedy (Organization)
Publications by Citizens for Kennedy (Organization) Publications by Citizens for Kennedy (Organization)
Most widely held works by Citizens for Kennedy (Organization)
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy visits with a retired couple, the MacNamaras, to discuss the high cost of their medical care, Newport, Kentucky] ( Visual )
3 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Various shots of the empty front porch of the house, showing the camera crew setting up, Kennedy entering the house, etc. Kennedy walks onto the porch from the house with the MacNamaras, crew sets up, Kennedy chats with the MacNamaras, discussing what they do, making small talk, etc. (ca. 4 min.). The spot: Kennedy introduces himself and the MacNamaras. Mr. MacNamara explains his injury and the resultant medical bills which caused him to go into debt. Kennedy points out that no legislation on the books addresses this problem, and states that he favors a plan under which senior citizens could receive assistance with their medical bills from the Social Security fund, thus preventing the situation described here. Kennedy asks Mr. MacNamara his opinion; MacNamara concurs with Kennedy. Kennedy thanks the couple. "The choice for medical aid to the elderly is clear: the Pauper's Oath program of the Republicans, or Senator Kennedy's plan through Social Security. Choose the Democratic way. Vote for Senator John F. Kennedy"--Voice over. (4 min., 15 sec.) Microphones are removed, Kennedy says his goodbyes, thanks his hosts, etc. (ca. 1 min.) Various shots of two different houses. (ca. 5 min.)
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Eleanor Roosevelt endorses John F. Kennedy and his position on civil rights] ( Visual )
2 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy visits with three women who have lost their sons to war, Newport, Kentucky] ( Visual )
2 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In Newport, Kentucky, Mrs. Stiles, Mrs. Shay, and Mrs. Wagner, each of whom lost a son to war, are seated at a dining table, awaiting Senator Kennedy's arrival. They arrange the table, have coffee poured, note the arrival of a charter bus, and that "the kids are all out there screaming" (with enthusiasm at Kennedy's appearance out front). They rise to greet Kennedy when he enters the room. Introductions are made all around; Kennedy combs his hair. The Gold Star mothers discuss with Kennedy their sons' military service and death. The director instructs Kennedy on how to proceed, the subject matter to be discussed, the length of the spot, how to sustain the discussion for that length of time, etc. Kennedy confirms names and hometowns. To begin the spot itself, Kennedy introduces himself, then the three women, explaining that each lost a son to war. Each woman speaks briefly about her son's military service and death. Kennedy states his own brother died in service, and that peace is a central concern of the 1960s. Khrushchev is unstable and the Chinese Communists have dedicated themselves to destruction of the U.S., believing that war is the way to communize the world. The best way to maintain peace is to be strong and to make sure that lines of commitment are clearly drawn and known. He cites examples of Hitler and North Korea. He looks with some optimism at the chances of maintaining peace in the sixties. If elected, he will devote all his energies to that. "We've had enough war." The women concur; Mrs. Stiles says she has three grown grandsons and wouldn't want anything to happen to them. Kennedy is hopeful that if the U.S. can keep its strength and nerves and persevere, the country can remain at peace. "John Kennedy, a man who knows the suffering of war but who is dedicated to the pursuit of peace ... This country needs new American leadership; the world needs it. John Kennedy for president"--Voice over. Spot is followed by 15 seconds of fragments
John F. Kennedy speaks on the Middle East ( Visual )
2 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
John F. Kennedy calls to the young at heart to be pioneers on the New Frontier and to demonstrate leadership and courage, in excerpts from his presidential nomination acceptance speech at the Los Angeles Coliseum
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Kennedy-Nixon debate--excerpts. New American leadership] ( Visual )
2 editions published in 1960 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Excerpts from a Kennedy-Nixon debate present Kennedy's belief that America "can do better." Kennedy believes the U.S. is a great and powerful country, but that it could be greater and more powerful. He is not satisfied with current steel production, the low economic growth rate, or the fact that the U.S. has over 9 billion dollars of food, some of it rotting, even though there is a hungry world and every month four million Americans wait for a government food package that averages five cents a day per individual. He is not satisfied when the Soviet Union turns out twice as many scientists and engineers as the U.S., when many teachers are underpaid, when children go to school in part-time shifts. He is not satisfied until every American enjoys his full constitutional rights. He compares a Negro baby's chances for future success with those of a white baby. Contrary to what some say, Kennedy does not want to turn everything over to the government; he wants the individuals to meet their responsibilities, and the states to meet theirs, but there is also a national responsibility. Those who feel the status quo is satisfactory should vote for Nixon. "The question before us all ... is can freedom, in the next generation, conquer, or are the communists going to be successful? ... If we meet our responsibilities, I think freedom will conquer ... If we fail to move ahead ... to develop sufficient military and economic and social strength here in this country, then I think the tide could begin to run against us ... I want [historians ten years from now] to say these were the years when the ... United States started to move again ... Only you can decide what you want, what you want this country to be, what you want to do with the future." "Vote for new American leadership; the country needs it, the world needs it. John Kennedy for president"--Voice over. Includes several unflattering cut-in shots of Nixon listening to Kennedy
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Kennedy-Nixon debate--excerpt. Democratic legislation, called extreme by Richard Nixon, is defended by John F. Kennedy] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Bills not passed by Congress but defended by Kennedy as moderate were to provide minimum wage increases, federal aid to education, and medical care for the aged
A message from Adlai Stevenson ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
According to Stevenson, the United States can and must win the great struggle between its system and that of the communists, and it must win it without nuclear war. The years 1952 through 1960 have been years of declining power and influence for the country. Senator Kennedy offers the vigorous and principled leadership which will answer Khrushchev's bluster not with words, and not with bombs, but by summoning forth the strength of the world's people for peace. Stevenson's points are illustrated by excerpts from Kennedy's presidential nomination acceptance speech at the Los Angeles Coliseum
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy asks New York viewers to register to vote, then asks their support] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy asks the support of Pennsylvania viewers] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Hubert Humphrey speaks to viewers on the decline of agricultural income] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The decline of agricultural income is the number one economic domestic issue and must be stopped; the Democratic Party and its standardbearer, John F. Kennedy, are determined that agricultural income will go up. The country's food abundance is a blessing, not a problem. It should be put to work, at home and abroad, to help humanity. The Party believes in the family farm as the best system of agriculture, and that an economic program for agriculture that will protect it must be sought. Humphrey believes that if American farms can be profitable, then America's cities will have full employment
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy speaks to viewers to say that full employment builds a stronger America] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. John F. Kennedy asks the support of California viewers] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. To see things as they are is the test of a man; to see what must be done and do it is the test of a democracy] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
John F. Kennedy speaks on domestic issues. The Republican Party has said no to progress, has vetoed progress; the country has been standing still. Kennedy will send to the Congress specific programs designed to carry out the following objectives: develop the country's resources (clean rivers, build roads, and put people to work in companies and businesses which have the resources to use the great wealth the Lord gave us); stimulate private investment by eliminating the artificial restrictions which the current Administration's high interest rate-tight money policy has placed on the economy's growth; and provide more federal aid to education
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Hubert H. Humphrey speaks to John F. Kennedy about the decline in agricultural income] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Kennedy outlines his farm program. He intends to continue programs with which he has been associated in the Senate for a number of years, including the Food for Peace program. He supports better distribution of surpluses to needy Americans and through the United Nations, as well as better research, and conservation of the land. Supply and demand must be balanced. Kennedy is committed to improving farmers' income; his goal is parity of income. Humphrey and Kennedy deride Nixon's proposed policies. Humphrey asserts that the president must outline a program and lay it before the Congress. In addition, the country needs a Secretary of Agriculture who will work for the farmer
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Adlai Stevenson speaks to viewers in support of John F. Kennedy] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Adlai Stevenson asserts that the 1960 election is more than a testing of two parties and two men; it is a test of whether both at home and abroad the U.S. will live up to its image of honor, liberty, and dignity for all people or if it will become soft, complacent, and apathetic. Kennedy has led the fight for a better minimum wage, for Social Security-funded medical care for the aged, and for federal aid to education. Under his leadership, the United States will win the fight for human rights
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Social programs for the elderly] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
John F. Kennedy vows to follow in the footsteps of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the provision of social services to the retired and elderly. He advocates passage of a federal medical care bill, changes in Social Security benefits, improvements in vocational guidance for retired persons and housing for the aged, and more research into the causes and prevention of diseases associated with advancing age. Includes excerpts from Kennedy's August 14, 1960 speech to senior citizens at Hyde Park National Shrine, the home of Roosevelt, on the 25th anniversary of the signing of the Social Security law
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Federal aid to education] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
In response to a question from the audience, John F. Kennedy points to barriers which have prevented passage of an effective federal aid to education bill, in particular, the Administration's threat of veto
[Political spots. Kennedy presidential campaign. Adlai Stevenson speaks to viewers about peace policies] ( Visual )
1 edition published in 1960 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Adlai Stevenson asserts that two policies for peace are being offered the United States. Rather than follow the current policy of backtalk, bickering, and obsession with Khrushchev's activities, the United States should reassert its own position. The majority of the world's nations wait for the United States to assume leadership for liberty and peace
 
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Languages
English (29)