WorldCat Identities

Hubbell, Ken

Overview
Works: 281 works in 281 publications in 1 language and 305 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Author
Classifications: F417.A67, 976.78
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Ken Hubbell
 
Most widely held works by Ken Hubbell
The Arkansas delta : a historical look at our land and people by Ken Hubbell( Book )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

First television at Huttig, Ark., ca. 1953( Visual )

1 edition published in 1953 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Negative of children watching the first television in Hutting, Union County, Arkansas
Edward S. Lockhart, founder and editor of the ECHO, 1905-42( Visual )

and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Edward S. Lockhart posed in suit, head propped on left hand. The Hot Springs ECHO was published in Hot Springs, Garland County, Arkansas. Born in 1880 in Mississippi, Edward S. Lockhart was the founder and editor of the Echo from 1905 until his death August 2, 1941. In 1912, he was secretary of the Review Publishing Company and editor of the Arkansas Review
Classroom in St. Bartholomew's School, Little Rock, Ark., February 10, 1949( Visual )

1 edition published in 1949 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Negative taken inside of classroom with sudents in desks at Saint Bartholomew's School, located at 1617 Marshall Street in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas. St. Bartholomew's School was founded in Little Rock for African American students by Bishop John B. Morris about 1912. The St. Bartholomew's Church was founded two years prior to the school in about 1910. The school was operated by the Society of the Divine Word. The high school department of St. Bartholomew's closed by 1972. St. Bartholomew's School completely closed in the spring of 1976
Murph kids from around Prescott, Ark., ca. 1925( Visual )

1 edition published in 1925 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Negative taken of Murph children sitting in and on automobile near Prescott, Nevada County, Arkansas
Masonic Temple, Arkansas Grand Lodge Prince Hall Masons, Pine Bluff, Ark., organized in 1873( Visual )

and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Copy negative of photograph of Masonic temple with cars on the streets beside it. The building was built during the tenure of Grand Master Moses A. Clark, an ex-slave, and was, in 1909, the tallest building in Pine Bluff. The Temple at 4th and State Streets in Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas, was begun in 1902 and completed in 1912. The building was damaged by fire in May, 1954. Remodeling began in the Fall of 1954 and was completed in 1955, with the installation of a self-service elevator
Polk and Bullock children at school, Muddy Fork, Ark., 1908( Visual )

1 edition published in 1908 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Negative of Polk and Bullock children at school in Muddy Fork, Howard County, Arkansas. Front row (left to right): Minnie Thompson, Pelly Dee Bullock (b. 1904 - ), Wesley (John Wesley) Bullock (Arthur Polk's future brother-in-law, b. July 1896- ) and Mattie Ann Bullock (September 1898), who married Arthur Polk. Second row is Annie Mae Polk (Johnson) (May 1886-1968), Pearl Polk (Murphy) (b. 1895), Lillian Polk (Shelton)(December 1896-1982) and Mamie Thompson. The third row is Arthur (Chester Alan Arthur) Polk (March 1883-October 1964), Jimmy Polk (March 1889-1910) and Oliver Thompson. Fourth row is Hardy Sumpter Murphy, teacher (b. July 10, 1885). Students stand barefooted in front of unpainted wooden frame building. According to Ruth Polk Patterson in her book "The Seed of Sally Good'n: A Black Family of Arkansas, 1833-1953, "the Thompson children were the offspring of Eliza Willis Thompson and allegedly, Allen Polk
Workers in Union Company Mill, Huttig, Ark., ca. 1953( Visual )

1 edition published in 1953 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Negative of unidentified African American men working at Union Company Mill, a lumber yard in Huttig, Union County, Arkansas
Honor Students to meet at Mann, 1964( Visual )

1 edition published in 1964 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Newspaper clipping: "Honor Student to Meet at Mann. About 200 delegates and sponsors of the Arkansas Negro chapter of the National Honor Society will meet at 9 a.m. today at Horace Mann High School for a series of general assemblies, meetings and a dinner meeting at 5:30 p.m. Officers will be elected during the day and will be installed at 8:00 p.m. Among the speakers wil be Dr. Raymond Miller, a physician at the Veterans Administration Hospital; Herman C. Ewing, executive director of the urban League of Greater Little Rock, School Superintendent Floyd W. Parsons and Mayor Borchert. Membership is restricted to students with a B average or higher." Horace Mann High School was located in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas
Branch Normal Faculty, 1903-4( Visual )

1 edition published in 1903 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Negative taken of Branch Normal Faculty, 1903-4. Back row (left to right): Joseph H. Michael, William B. Crittenden. Front row (left to right): Mattie I. Benson, Irene V. Coleman, Isaac Fisher, Julia O. Wright, Sadie M. Peebles. Issac Fisher (1877-1957?) was the second principal of Branch Normal College (now University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff) in Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas from 1902-1911. A 1898 graduate of Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Jefferson County, Arkansas, Fisher believed in vocational education and formed the agriculture department. After leaving AM & N, he taught at Fisk University and Hampton Institute
J.C. Corbin, third grand master, Arkansas Grand Lodge Prince Hall Masons, Pine Bluff, Ark, organized in 1873( Visual )

and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Copy negative of an engraving of J.C. (Joseph Carter) Corbin, who was the founder of Branch Normal College, created in 1873 as a branch of the Arkansas Industrial University (now the University of Arkansas) by an act of the Arkansas Legislature. The school later became the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff in Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas
Wiley Jones street railway stables at Main and Harding in 1892 in Pine Bluff, Ark( Visual )

1 edition published in 1892 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Negative taken of Wiley Jones street railway stabled at Main and Harding Streets in Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas from "Pine Bluff and Jefferson County: A Pictorial History" by James W. Leslie (Norfolk, VA: The Donning Company Publishers, 1981). Wiley Jones was born in Madison County, Georgia on July 14, 1848. He moved to Jefferson County in 1853, with his white planter father (George Jones), his slave mother (Ann) and 40 slaves, including five siblings. He was given to a Texas family, but returned to Pine Bluff after the Civil War, where he became a businessman and philanthropist. Initially he was a barber and part-time waiter, but soon bought a saloon, operated the first streetcar in Pine Bluff, and purchased stables and Jones Park in the late 1880s. Jones Park, a 55-acre park named after Wiley Jones, included a racetrack. He was an active Republican, a founding member of the Board of Directors of the Colored Industrial Institute, and gave a large donation for the construction of the Saint James A.M.E Church at Popular and West Fourth Street in Pine Bluff. Jones died on December 7, 1904
Eight of the ten Polk children at Muddy Fork, Ark., ca. 1936( Visual )

1 edition published in 1936 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Arthur (Chester Alan Arthur) Polk and his wife, Mattie Ann Bullock Polk had nine children. The youngest, Arthur Polk, Jr. (b. 1936) died in infancy. The eight surviving children are shown in this photograph: left to right: Cindy Lee Polk (b. 1932), Ruth Polk Patterson (August 10, 1930-July 1988), Marjorie Helen Polk (b. 1929), Herbert Hoover Hadley Polk (1927-1983), Julia Ann Polk (b. 1926), Raymond Clay (Ray) Polk (1925-1983), Jack Dempsey (Dempsey) Polk (b. 1923) and William Henry Polk (1922-1967)
Girl Scouts at Camp Ouachita, late 1950's( Visual )

and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Mrs. W.C.?, troop leader, sits on porch as Ruth and Joann White and a friend look out the screen door of the rock cabin, Camp Ouacita in Perry County, Arkansas
Florence Pledger Gunnels, Olie Good Pledger, Lydia Pledger English, Earlie Pledger Rall and Zennettie Pledger Gunnels, late 1940's( Visual )

and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Left to right standing in front of bushes on the right and a lumber company in the left background are Florence Pledger Gunnels (02/02/1907-03/23/1981), Olie Good Pledger, Lydia Pledger English (02/14/1886-10/11/1978), Earlie Pledger Rall (1901-1982) and Zennettie Pledger Gunnels (1905-1980) in Morrilton, Conway County, Arkansas, in the late 1940's
Blanche and James Neal( Visual )

and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Negative taken of Blanche and James Neal in military uniforms, from near Bigelow, Perry County, Arkansas. Blanche and James Neal were brothers whose parents were Cordelia Neal (b. ca. 1868 in Arkansas) and J.W. Neal (b. ca. 1864 in Arkansas), a farmer. Blanche Neal was born September 24, 1896. James Neal was born February 9, 1888
Lois Logan Natt, Christmas, 1960( Visual )

1 edition published in 1960 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Lois Logan Natt, seated in a chair beside a television, lived in Hot Springs, Garland County, Arkansas
Lencola Sullivan, first black Miss Arkansas, 1980( Visual )

1 edition published in 1980 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Miss Arkansas Lencola Sullivan of Morrilton, Conway County, Arkansas, showing three different hairstyles. Sullivan was crowned Miss Arkansas in August, 1980; she was first African American Miss Arkansas. She was a runner up to Miss America. As of 2001, she was living in New York City, where she does motivational speaking on self-esteem and personal empowerment for women
M.L. King (left) and Lawrence Davis Sr. (right), 1958 Homecoming at Pine Bluff, Ark by Ark.) Grice Studio (Pine Bluff( Visual )

1 edition published in 1958 and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Negative taken of Civil Rights activit Martin Luther King, Jr. and Lawrence Davis Sr. at the 1958 Homcoming at Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas. The Homecoming is probably for the Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal (A.M. & N.) College (now called University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. Born in McCrory, Woodruff County, Arkansas in 1914, Lawrence A. Davis graduated from Merrill High School in Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas in 1933. He received an A.B. Degree in English from the Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical, and Normal College in Pine Bluff (later called Univ. of Arkansas at Pine Bluff) in 1937, and a M.A. degree from the University of Kansas in 1941. Davis was president of the Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical, and Normal College in Pine Bluff from 1943-1972 and became the first Chancellor of the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. Dr. Davis became the President of Laney College in Oakland, Alameda County, California in 1975
Aunt Mariah Lane( Visual )

and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Negative taken of Mariah Lane in Perry County, Arkansas
 
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