WorldCat Identities

Anbinder, Tyler

Overview
Works: 19 works in 90 publications in 2 languages and 4,258 library holdings
Genres: History  Biographies  Academic theses  Biographical television programs  Documentary films  Documentary television programs  Biographical films  Historical films  Historical television programs  Biography 
Roles: Author, Thesis advisor
Classifications: F128.9.A1, 974.71
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Tyler Anbinder
City of dreams : the 400-year epic history of immigrant New York by Tyler Anbinder( Book )

15 editions published between 2016 and 2018 in English and French and held by 1,368 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

With more than three million foreign-born residents today, New York has been America's defining port of entry for nearly four centuries, a magnet for transplants from all over the globe. These migrants have brought their hundreds of languages and distinct cultures to the city, and from there to the entire country. More immigrants have come to New York than all other entry points combined. City of Dreams is peopled with memorable characters both beloved and unfamiliar, whose lives unfold in rich detail: the young man from the Caribbean who passed through New York on his way to becoming a Founding Father; the ten-year-old Angelo Siciliano, from Calabria, who transformed into Charles Atlas, bodybuilder; Dominican-born Oscar de la Renta, whose couture designs have dressed first ladies from Jackie Kennedy to Michelle Obama. Tyler Anbinder's story is one of innovators and artists, revolutionaries and rioters, staggering deprivation and soaring triumphs, all playing out against the powerful backdrop of New York City, at once ever-changing and profoundly, permanently itself. City of Dreams provides a vivid sense of what New York looked like, sounded like, smelled like, and felt like over the centuries of its development and maturation into the city we know today
Nativism and slavery : the northern Know Nothings and the politics of the 1850's by Tyler Anbinder( Book )

23 editions published between 1992 and 2005 in English and held by 1,317 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Although the United States has always portrayed itself as a sanctuary for the world's victim's of poverty and oppression, anti-immigrant movements have enjoyed remarkable success throughout American history. None attained greater prominence than the Order of the Star Spangled Banner, a fraternal order referred to most commonly as the Know Nothing party. Vowing to reduce the political influence of immigrants and Catholics, the Know Nothings burst onto the American political scene in 1854, and by the end of the following year they had elected eight governors, more than one hundred congressmen, and thousands of other local officials including the mayors of Boston, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Chicago. After their initial successes, the Know Nothings attempted to increase their appeal by converting their network of lodges into a conventional political organization, which they christened the "American Party." Recently, historians have pointed to the Know Nothings' success as evidence that ethnic and religious issues mattered more to nineteenth-century voters than better-known national issues such as slavery. In this important book, however, Anbinder argues that the Know Nothings' phenomenal success was inextricably linked to the firm stance their northern members took against the extension of slavery. Most Know Nothings, he asserts, saw slavery and Catholicism as interconnected evils that should be fought in tandem. Although the Know Nothings certainly were bigots, their party provided an early outlet for the anti-slavery sentiment that eventually led to the Civil War. Anbinder's study presents the first comprehensive history of America's most successful anti-immigrant movement, as well as a major reinterpretation of the political crisis that led to the Civil War
Five Points : the 19th-century New York City neighborhood that invented tap dance, stole elections, and became the world's most notorious slum by Tyler Anbinder( Book )

16 editions published between 2001 and 2014 in English and held by 1,184 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Five Points (an intersection in lower Manhattan formed when Anthony Street was extended to meet Orange and Cross-today's Baxter and North Streets), was the most infamous neighborhood in nineteenth-century America. Visitors from Charles Dickens to Abraham Lincoln flocked to Five Points to witness the filthy streets, bordellos, gambling dens, and tenements that housed the lowest of the low. A close look at Five Points reveals a hidden world. As one of the most ethnically varied areas in the nation's most diverse city, The Five Points story is a classic American example of immigrant energy and ambition. From "Bowery Boy" culture to the invention of tap dance, to the most famous prize-fight of the century, to the timeless photographs of Jacob Riis, Five Points illuminates the colorful history of a fascinating community
City of dreams : the 400-year epic history of immigrant New York by Tyler Anbinder( Recording )

11 editions published between 2016 and 2017 in English and held by 258 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Anbinder offers an account of New York's both famous and forgotten immigrants, stories of innovators and artists, revolutionaries and rioters, staggering deprivation and soaring triumphs
Gone to Texas: Eastern-European Jewish and Italian Immigrants in Urban Texas, 1900-1924 by Stacy D. Ph. D Bondurant( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 43 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This dissertation offers a close examination of the East European Jewish and Italian immigrant populations of three Texas cities--Dallas, Galveston, and Houston--at the turn of the century. Using statistical data derived from the 1900 and 1920 United States federal manuscript censuses, as well as information gathered from a variety of sources including newspapers, census directories, and religious organization records, it weaves together a narrative of the immigrant experience of two populations that receive little scholarly attention in studies of Texas history
Five Points : the 19th century New York City neighborhood that invented tap dance, stole elections, and became the world's most notorious slum by Tyler Anbinder( )

3 editions published between 2003 and 2018 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The very letters of the two words seem, as they are written, to redden with the blood-stains of unavenged crime. There is Murder in every syllable, and Want, Misery and Pestilence take startling form and crowd upon the imagination as the pen traces the words." So wrote a reporter about Five Points, the most infamous neighborhood in nineteenth-century America, the place where "slumming" was invented. All but forgotten today, Five Points was once renowned the world over. Its handful of streets in lower Manhattan featured America's most wretched poverty, shared by Irish, Jewish, German, Italian, Chinese, and African Americans. It was the scene of more riots, scams, saloons, brothels, and drunkenness than any other neighborhood in the new world. Yet it was also a font of creative energy, crammed full of cheap theaters and dance halls, prizefighters and machine politicians, and meeting halls for the political clubs that would come to dominate not just the city but an entire era in American politics. From Jacob Riis to Abraham Lincoln, Davy Crockett to Charles Dickens, Five Points both horrified and inspired everyone who saw it. The story that Anbinder tells is the classic tale of America's immigrant past, as successive waves of new arrivals fought for survival in a land that was as exciting as it was dangerous, as riotous as it was culturally rich. Tyler Anbinder offers the first-ever history of this now forgotten neighborhood, drawing on a wealth of research among letters and diaries, newspapers and bank records, police reports and archaeological digs. Beginning with the Irish potato-famine influx in the 1840s, and ending with the rise of Chinatown in the early twentieth century, he weaves unforgettable individual stories into a tapestry of tenements, work crews, leisure pursuits both licit and otherwise, and riots and political brawls that never seemed to let up. Although the intimate stories that fill Anbinder's narrative are heart-wrenching, they are perhaps not so shocking as they first appear. Almost all of us trace our roots to once humble stock. Five Points is, in short, a microcosm of America
Boss Tweed( Visual )

3 editions published between 2004 and 2005 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Explore the rise and fall of the notorious party boss who controlled New York's Tammany Hall
Five Points : the Nineteenth-Century New York City Neighborhood by Tyler Anbinder( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nativism and Slavery by Tyler Anbinder( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Political protest against immigrants has come to a head several times in American history. The most famous and influential such protest was exemplified by the Know-Nothing Party, founded in 1854 and directed especially against Catholic immigrants. By the end of 1855 the party had elected eight governors, over one hundred Congressmen, and thousands of local officials. Prominent politicians of every persuasion joined the party, which then changed its name to the American Party. It; became a major element in the new Republican Party, which first produced a presidential candidate in 1856. The party and its influence has not attracted much attention from historians, because the events involved in the coming of the Civil War eclipsed interest in a movement that was only; peripherally involved with Civil War issues.; The Know-Nothings had a precipitous decline, starting with the 1856 election, at which their presidential candidate Millard Fillmore carried only one state. The Republican Party soon eclipsed it, too. Tyler Anbinder has written the first comprehensive history of the Know-Nothings, and his book represents a major revision of historiography in the years leading up to the Civil War
Immigrants and savers : a rich new database on the Irish in 1850s New York by Simone A Wegge( Book )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Retrieving the American past : a customized U.S. history reader( Book )

4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Which Irish men and women immigrated to the United States during the Great Famine migration of 1846-54?( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Despite the extensive scholarly literature on both the Great Famine in Ireland and the Famine immigration to the United States, little is known about precisely which Irish men and women emigrated from Ireland in the Famine era. This article makes use of a new dataset comprised of 18, 000 Famine-era emigrants (2 per cent of the total) who landed at the port of New York from 1846 to 1854 and whose ship manifests list their Irish county of origin. The data is used to estimate the number of emigrants from each county in Ireland who arrived in New York during the Famine era. Because three-quarters of all Irish immigrants intending to settle in the United States took ships to New York, this dataset provides the best means available for estimating the origins of the United States's Famine immigrants. The authors find that while the largest number of Irish immigrants came from some of Ireland's most populous counties, such as Cork, Galway, and Tipperary, surprisingly large numbers also originated in Counties Cavan, Meath, Dublin, and Queen's County, places not usually associated with the highest levels of emigration. The data also indicates that the overall level of emigration in the Famine years was significantly higher than scholars have previously understood
On Lord Palmerston and the Irish famine emigration( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Nativism and slavery: the northern Know Nothings and the politics of the 1850's by Tyler Anbinder( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Permission must be received for any subsequent distribution in print or electronically. Please contact info@hebook.org for more information
William Penn Clarke and the Know Nothing movement : a document by Tyler Anbinder( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

President Garfield profile( Visual )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In the second of an eight part series on the Ohio presidents, the life of James Abram Garfield, the 20th president who served from March to July 1881, was profiled. Historians, scholars and descendants discussed the public and private lives of President Garfield. Viewers also participated in the discussion by telephone. President Garfield was a compromise candidate for the Republicans in 1880. He was shot on July 2, 1881, by Charles Guiteau, a disaffected office-seeker, and died a few months later. His home, which he lived in for five years before becoming President, contains a memorial library created by his wife after his death. James R. Garfield, II, is President Garfield's great-grandson
Forum on the legacy of Oscar Handlin : special issue by Tyler Anbinder( Book )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Nativism and slavery : the northern Know Nothings and the politics of the 1850's Tyler Anbinder by Tyler Anbinder( )

1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

American Party
Nativism and politics : the Know Nothing Party in the northern United States by Tyler Anbinder( )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Nativism and slavery : the northern Know Nothings and the politics of the 1850's
Covers
Five Points : the 19th-century New York City neighborhood that invented tap dance, stole elections, and became the world's most notorious slumNativism and Slavery
Alternative Names
Anbinder, Tyler G.

Tyler Anbinder historian

Tyler Anbinder Historiker

Languages
English (84)

French (3)