WorldCat Identities

Dollar, David

Overview
Works: 154 works in 558 publications in 1 language and 10,833 library holdings
Roles: Author, Editor, Other, Redactor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by David Dollar
Competitiveness, convergence, and international specialization by David Dollar( Book )

18 editions published between 1993 and 1995 in English and Undetermined and held by 643 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Globalization, growth, and poverty : building an inclusive world economy by Paul Collier( Book )

17 editions published between 2001 and 2002 in English and held by 637 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Globalization is a powerful force for poverty reduction as societies and economies around the world are becoming more integrated. Although this international integration presents tremendous opportunities for developing countries, it also has raised concerns about rising inequality, shifting power, and cultural uniformity. This report assesses the impact of globalization and addresses the ensuing anxieties. It proposes an agenda for action aimed at mitigating the risks that globalization potentially generates, while maximizing the opportunities for the poor.--Publisher description
Aid and reform in Africa : lessons from ten case studies( Book )

22 editions published between 2000 and 2002 in English and held by 537 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Finally, when the country enters the second generation of reforms, such as public sector institutional reform, short-term, conditionality-based aid can once again be harmful - by reducing ownership, participation, and sustainability of the reform process."--Jacket
The Role of the state in Taiwan's development by Joel D Aberbach( Book )

12 editions published between 1993 and 2015 in English and held by 415 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

These essays are a product of a co-operative research project between American and Taiwanese social scientists. Of particular interest is the chapter discussing a comparative study of industrial policy, productivity growth and structural change in manufacturing
Economic growth, poverty, and household welfare in Vietnam by Paul Glewwe( Book )

18 editions published between 2004 and 2013 in English and held by 242 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Household welfare and Vietnam's transition by David Dollar( Book )

14 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Aid, policies, and growth by Craig Burnside( )

27 editions published between 1997 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 134 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The authors revisit the relationship between aid and growth using a new data set focusing on the 1990s. The evidence supports the view that the impact of aid depends on the quality of state institutions and policies. The authors use an overall measure of institutions and policies popular in the empirical growth literature. The interaction of aid and institutional quality has a robust positive relationship with growth that is strongest in instrumental variable regressions. There is no support for the competing hypothesis that aid has the same positive effect everywhere. The authors also show that in the 1990s the allocation of aid to low-income countries favored those with better institutional quality. This "selectivity" is sensible if aid in fact is more productive in sound institutional and policy environments. The cross-country evidence on aid effectiveness is supported by other types of information as well: case studies, project-level evidence, and opinion polls support the view that corrupt institutions and weak policies limit the impact of financial assistance for development
The search for the key : aid, investment, and policies in Africa by David Dollar( Book )

12 editions published in 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 79 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

March 1999 Aid does not necessarily finance investment, and investment does not necessarily promote growth. But the combination of private investment, good policies, and foreign aid is quite powerful. When societies themselves take the lead in putting growth-enhancing policies in place, foreign aid can play a powerful supporting role, bringing ideas, technical assistance, and money. Dollar and Easterly's study of aid, investment, and policies in Africa leads them to four principal conclusions: * The traditional links between aid, investment, and growth are not robust. Aid does not necessarily finance investment and investment does not necessarily promote growth. * Differences in economic policies can explain much of the difference in growth performance. Poor quality of public services, closed trade regimes, financial repression, and macroeconomic mismanagement explain Africa's poor record. * Foreign aid cannot easily promote lasting policy reform in countries where there is no strong domestic movement in that direction. Country ownership of reform is more important than donor conditionality. * These three conclusions imply that societies themselves must take the lead in putting growth-enhancing policies in place. When this happens, foreign aid can play a powerful supporting role, bringing ideas, technical assistance, and money. The combination of private investment, good policies, and foreign aid is quite powerful. Where do we stand in the search for the key to growth in Africa? Because past keys to growth in Africa have failed, Dollar and Easterly are cautious about claims to a new key. But even if aid-cum-private-investment-cum-policy reform falls short of being the one and only key to growth, disbursing aid into good policy environments would be an improvement on current practices. This paper-a product of Macroeconomics and Growth, Development Research Group-is part of a larger effort in the group to examine aid effectiveness. The authors may be contacted at ddollar@worldbank.org or weasterly@worldbank.org
Who gives foreign aid to whom and why? by Alberto Alesina( Book )

13 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 77 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper studies the pattern of allocation of foreign aid from various donors to receiving countries. We find considerable evidence that the direction of foreign aid is dictated by political and strategic considerations, much more than by the economic needs and policy performance of the recipients. Colonial past and political alliances are the major determinants of foreign aid. At the margin, however, countries that democratize receive more aid, ceteris paribus. While foreign aid flows respond more to political variables, foreign direct investments are more sensitive to economic incentives, particularly property rights in the receiving countries. We also uncover significant differences in the behavior of different donors
Growth is good for the poor by David Dollar( )

14 editions published between 2000 and 2001 in English and held by 73 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When average incomes rise, the average incomes of the poorest fifth of society rise proportionately. This holds across regions, periods, income levels, and growth rates. But relatively little is known about the broad forces that account for the variations across countries and across time in the share of income accruing to the poorest fifth
What explains the success or failure of structural adjustment programs? by David Dollar( )

12 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 72 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

June 1998 A few political economy variables can successfully predict the outcome of an adjustment loan 75 percent of the time. To select promising candidates for adjustment, the World Bank must do a better job of understanding which environments are promising for reform and which are not. Being more selective may mean smaller volumes of lending. In the 1980s development assistance shifted largely from financing investments (such as roads and dams) to promoting policy reform. This change came because of a growing awareness that developing countries were held back more by poor policies than by a lack of finance for investment. After nearly 20 years' experience with policy-based or conditional lending, there have now been many studies of adjustment lending, most of which take a case-study approach. Many conclude that policy-based lending works if countries have decided on their own to reform. Dollar and Svensson examine a database of 220 World Bank-supported reform programs to identify why adjustment programs succeed or fail. They find that a few political economy variables can successfully predict the outcome of an adjustment loan 75 percent of the time. Variables under the World Bank's control-resources devoted to preparation and supervision or number of conditions-have no relationship with an adjustment program's success or failure. What development agencies must do, then, is select promising candidates for adjustment support. When the candidate is a poor selection, devoting more administrative resources or imposing more conditions will not increase the likelihood of successful reform. To improve its success rate with adjustment lending, the World Bank must become more selective and do a better job of understanding which environments are promising for reform and which are not. That is likely to lead to fewer adjustment loans, unless there is a significant change in the number of promising reformers. To become more effective at supporting policy reform, the agency must be willing to accept that this may lead to smaller volumes of lending. This paper-a product of the Macroeconomics and Growth, Development Research Group-is part of a larger effort in the group to examine aid effectiveness. The study was funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under the research project Economic Policies and the Effect of Foreign Aid (RPO 681-70). The authors may be contacted at ddollar@worldbank.org. or jsvensson@worldbank.org
Can the World Cut Poverty in Half? How Policy Reform and Effective Aid Can Meet International Development Goals by Paul Collier( )

15 editions published between 1999 and 2000 in English and Undetermined and held by 72 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effort in the group to study aid effectiveness. The authors may be contacted at pcollier@worldbank.org or ddollar@worldbank.org
Aid Allocation and Poverty Reduction by David Dollar( )

13 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Litically difficult, but it may be considerably less difficult than quadrupling aid budgets, which is what the authors estimate would be necessary to achieve the same impact on poverty reduction with existing aid allocations. This paper - a joint product of the Office of the Director, and Macroeconomics and Growth, Development Research Group - is part of a larger effort in the group to examine aid effectiveness. The authors may be contacted at pcollier@worldbank.org or ddollar@worldbank.org
Asian Century Or Multi-Polar Century ? by David Dollar( )

11 editions published between 2007 and 2012 in English and Undetermined and held by 69 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The "rise of Asia" is something of a myth. During 1990-2005 China accounted for 28 percent of global growth, measured at purchasing power parity (PPP). India accounted for 9 percent. The rest of developing Asia, with nearly a billion people, accounted for only 7 percent, the same as Latin America. Hence there is no general success of Asian developing economies. China has grown better than its developing neighbors because it started its reform with a better base of human capital, has been more open to foreign trade and investment, and created good investment climates in coastal cities. China's success changes the equation going forward: its wages are now two to three times higher than in the populous Asian countries (Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, and Vietnam), and China will become an ever-larger importer of natural resource and labor-intensive products. Developing countries need to become more open and improve their investment climates to benefit from these opportunities. China itself faces new challenges that could hamper its further development: unsustainable trade imbalance with the United States, energy and water scarcity and unsustainable use of natural resources, and growing inequality and social tension. To address the first two of these challenges, good cooperation between China and the United States is essential. The author concludes that we are more likely to be facing a "multi-polar century," than an Asian century
The increasing selectivity of foreign aid, 1984-2002 by David Dollar( )

11 editions published between 2004 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 67 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The authors examine the allocation of foreign aid by 41 donor agencies, bilateral and multilateral. Their policy selectivity index measures the extent to which a donor's assistance is targeted to countries with sound institutions and policies, controlling for per capita income and population. The poverty selectivity index analogously looks at how well a donor's assistance is targeted to poor countries, controlling for institutional and policy environment as measured by a World Bank index. The authors' main finding is that the same group of multilateral and bilateral aid agencies that are very policy focused are also very poverty focused. The donors that appear high up in both rankings are the World Bank's International Development Association, the International Monetary Fund's Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility, Denmark, the United Kingdom, Norway, Ireland, and the Netherlands. As a robustness check the authors alternatively use institutional quality measures independent of the World Bank and find the same pattern of selectivity. They also find that policy selectivity is a new phenomenon: in the 1984-89 period, aid overall was allocated indiscriminately without any consideration to the quality of governance, whereas in the 1990s there was a clear relationship between aid and governance (institutions and policies). This increasing selectivity of aid is good news for aid effectiveness. The bad news is that the aid agencies that the authors survey vary greatly in size. Some donors that are largest in absolute size, such as France and the United States, are not particularly selective. Japan comes in high on the policy selectivity index but far down on the poverty selectivity index, reflecting its pattern of giving large amounts of aid in Asia to countries that are well governed but in many cases not poor
Aid, the incentive regime, and poverty reduction by Craig Burnside( )

11 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 66 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

June 1998 Aid spurs growth and poverty reduction only in a good policy environment so it should be targeted to countries that have improved their economic policy. That aid tends to be allocated relatively indiscriminately is one factor that undermines its potential impact. Spurring growth in the developing world is one stated objective of foreign aid. Another, more commonly cited, objective is reducing poverty. Generally poverty reduction and growth go hand in hand, but could aid mitigate poverty without measurably affecting growth? Burnside and Dollar examine how foreign aid affects infant mortality-an important social indicator that provides indirect evidence that the benefits of development are reaching people everywhere. They conclude that in developing countries with weak economic management-evidenced by poor property rights, high levels of corruption, closed trade regimes, and macroeconomic instability-there is no relationship between aid and the change in infant mortality. In distorted environments, development projects promoted by donors tend to fail. And aid resources are typically fungible, so the aid does not in fact finance these projects. Aid finances the whole public sector at the margin, which is why the quality of management is the key to effective assistance. A government that cannot put effective development policies in place is unlikely to oversee the effective use of foreign aid. On the other hand, there is a relationship between aid and a change in infant mortality when the recipient country has relatively good management. When management is good, additional aid worth 1 percent of GDP has a powerful effect, reducing infant mortality by 0.9 percent. In other words, aid spurs growth and improvements in social indicators only in a good policy environment. These findings strengthen the case for targeting foreign aid to countries that have improved their economic policy. But after controlling for per capita income and population, there has been almost no relationship between countries' economic policies and the amount of aid they get. The relatively indiscriminate allocation of assistance is one factor undermining the potential impact of aid. This paper-a product of Macroeconomics and Growth, Development Research Group-is part of a larger effort in the group to examine aid effectiveness. The study was funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under the research project Economic Policies and the Effectiveness of Foreign Aid (RPO 681-70). The authors may be contacted at cburnside@worldbank.org or ddollar@worldbank.org
Investment climate and international integration by Taye Mengistae( )

9 editions published between 2004 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 64 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Drawing on recently completed firm-level surveys in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Honduras, India, Nicaragua, Pakistan, and Peru, this paper investigates the relationship between investment climate and international integration. These standardized surveys of large, random samples of firms in common sectors reveal how firms experience bottlenecks and delays in hard infrastructure such as power and telecom as well as in soft infrastructure such as customs administration. The authors focus primarily on measures of the time or monetary cost of different bottlenecks (e.g., days to clear goods through customs, days to get a telephone line, sales lost to power outages). For many of these costs, the obstacles are lower in China than in the South Asian or Latin American countries. There is also systematic variation across cities within countries. The authors estimate a probit function for the probability that a randomly chosen firm is foreign-invested and a separate probit for the probability that a randomly chosen firm is an exporter. These measures of international integration are higher where investment climate is better. For locations to take advantage of opportunities in the international market, they need good infrastructure and a sound regulatory environment. The interaction of openness and sound investment climate creates a good environment for investment and production. This paper helps explain why China has been so successful over the past decade, both in terms of integration and of rapid growth, while other countries have had varied success
Reform, growth, and poverty in Vietnam by David Dollar( )

9 editions published between 2002 and 2013 in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Vietnam grew rapidly in the 1990s, and yet by many measures it has poor economic institutions. Dollar seeks to explain this apparent anomaly. Between the 1980s and 1990s Vietnam carried out significant economic reforms, notably stabilization, the introduction of positive real interest rates, trade liberalization, and initial property rights reform in agriculture. Relating these changes to the empirical growth literature, the author finds that Vietnam's growth acceleration is about what would be predicted. Conditional convergence also suggests that the country's high growth rate will decelerate unless further reforms are taken. The author then looks at the level of institutional and policy development in Vietnam compared with other emerging market economies. While Vietnam's policies have improved, they did so starting from a very low base. So, it can be simultaneously true that Vietnam's policies have improved a lot and yet are rather poor in comparative perspective. A comparison of governance indicators, financial sector issues, and the infrastructure of international integration reveals serious institutional weaknesses in Vietnam that need to be addressed if a high growth rate is to be sustained
Globalization, poverty, and inequality since 1980 by David Dollar( )

10 editions published between 2001 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 60 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

One of the most contentious issues of globalization is the effect of global economic integration on inequality and poverty. This paper documents five trends in the modern era of globalization, starting around 1980. Trend #1: Poor country growth rates have accelerated and are higher than rich country growth rates - for the first time in modern history. The developing world economy grew at more than 3.5 percent per capita in the 1990s. Trend #2: The number of poor people in the world has declined significantly - by 375 million people since 1981 -- the first such decline in history. The share of the developing world population living on less than $1 per day was cut in half since 1981. Trend #3: Global inequality (among citizens of the world) has declined - modestly -- reversing a 200-year-old trend toward higher inequality. Trend #4: There is no general trend toward higher inequality within countries. Trend #5: Wage inequality is rising worldwide (which may seem to contradict trend #4, but it does not because wages are a small part of household income in developing countries, which make up the bulk of the world in terms of countries and population). Furthermore, the trends toward faster growth and poverty reduction are strongest in the developing countries in which there has been the most rapid integration with the global economy, supporting the view that integration has been a positive force for improving peoples lives in the developing world
Das (wasted) kapital : firm ownership and investment efficiency in China by David Dollar( Book )

22 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 45 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Based on a survey that we designed and that covers a stratified random sample of 12,400 firms in 120 cities in China with firm-level accounting information for 2002-2004, this paper examines the presence of systematic distortions in capital allocation that result in uneven marginal returns to capital across firm ownership, regions, and sectors. It provides a systematic comparison of investment efficiency among wholly and partially state-owned, wholly and partially foreign-owned, and domestic privately owned firms, conditioning on their sector, location, and size characteristics. It finds that even after a quarter-of-century of reforms, state-owned firms still have significantly lower returns to capital, on average, than domestic private or foreign-owned firms. Similarly, certain regions and sectors have consistently lower returns to capital than other regions and sectors. By our calculation, if China succeeds in allocating its capital more efficiently, it could reduce its capital stock by 8 percent without sacrificing its economic growth (and hence could raise its household consumption and deliver a faster improvement to its citizens' living standard)
 
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WorldCat IdentitiesRelated Identities
Competitiveness, convergence, and international specialization
Alternative Names
David Dollar economist (Brookings Institution)

David Dollar Wirtschaftswissenschaftler (Amerikan. Wirtschaftswissenschaftler und Sinologe / Tätig an der Weltbank seit 1989, zuletzt als Country director für China und die Mongolei (2004))

Dollar, David

Dollar, David R.

ديفيد دولار، 1954-

달러, 데이빗 1954-

Languages
English (281)

Covers
Globalization, growth, and poverty : building an inclusive world economyAid and reform in Africa : lessons from ten case studiesThe Role of the state in Taiwan's developmentEconomic growth, poverty, and household welfare in VietnamHousehold welfare and Vietnam's transition