WorldCat Identities

Drug Policy Research Center (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 33 works in 56 publications in 1 language and 3,101 library holdings
Genres: Data tape catalogs 
Classifications: AS36, 338.433634509753
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Drug Policy Research Center (U.S.)
Reducing drug trafficking revenues and violence in Mexico : would legalizing marijuana in California help? by Beau Kilmer( )

8 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 2,025 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U.S. demand for illicit drugs creates markets for Mexican drug trafficking organizations (DTOs) and helps foster violence in Mexico. This paper examines how marijuana legalization in California might influence DTO revenues and the violence in Mexico. Key findings include: 1) Mexican DTOs' gross revenues from illegally exporting marijuana to wholesalers in the United States is likely less than $2 billion; 2) The claim that 60 percent of Mexican DTO gross drug export revenues come from marijuana should not be taken seriously; 3) If legalization only affects revenues from supplying marijuana to California, DTO drug export revenue losses would be very small, perhaps 2-4 percent; 4) The only way legalizing marijuana in California would significantly influence DTO revenues and the related violence is if California-produced marijuana is smuggled to other states at prices that outcompete current Mexican supplies. The extent of such smuggling will depend on a number of factors, including the response of the U.S. federal government. 5) If marijuana is smuggled from California to other states, it could undercut sales of Mexican marijuana in much of the U.S., cutting DTOs' marijuana export revenues by more than 65 percent and probably by 85 percent or more. In this scenario, the DTOs would lose approximately 20% of their total drug export revenues
Money from crime : a study of the economics of drug dealing in Washington, D.C. by Peter Reuter( Book )

2 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 196 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"June 1990.""R-3894-RF." Includes bibliographical references (p. 165-172)
The drug abuse treatment system : prospects for reform by John Haaga( Book )

3 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 176 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Among various issues for increasing the effectiveness of the drug abuse treatment system are matching clients with treatment programs and improving program accountability. From a practical perspective, no tool is currently available to assist agencies make better matches, and in many communities the number of alternatives (i.e., truly different program content and philosophy) is limited. Moreover, there is no conclusive scientific evidence to support any particular matching strategy. And it is unclear whether the policy goal should be to improve the probability of positive individual outcomes or to reduce aggregate drug use. Research is needed to inform the practical and theoretical issues. Although improved accountability is clearly needed, previous approaches have not been successful. New proposals for outcome monitoring are worth pursuing, although providers' responses could defeat the purpose of reforms. Finally, there is a need for studies that will help set reasonable performance standards
Private versus public sector insurance coverage for drug abuse by Jeannette A Rogowski( Book )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 173 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study examined financing mechanisms currently in place for treating drug abuse, focusing primarily on differences between private and public insurance mechanisms. Within the private sector, insurance coverage for drug abuse treatment is quite restrictive. Limitations typically exist on the type and amount of treatment that can be received per year or per lifetime, and benefits may quickly be exhausted. Limitations also exist with regard to public insurance funding. Eligibility requirements and the authorized settings in which care may be provided are extremely restrictive. It has been argued that public funding for drug abuse should be mainstreamed into Medicaid. However, this is not likely to occur due to significant institutional barriers, and in particular to the highly restrictive eligibility requirements for public programs
Substance abuse problems and programs in Newark : a needs assessment for Newark's Fighting Back Initiative by Patricia A Ebener( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 157 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes the nature and extent of substance abuse problems in Newark, their effects on the community, and the programs and resources currently addressing them. Because it focuses primarily on the city's problems, this report does not present a very flattering portrait. Indeed, some of the figures it contains are quite depressing. However, Newark is not alone in possessing these problems. Any city of significant size will have its own pockets of high-risk residents exhibiting many of the same problems of self-destructive behavior. What does set Newark apart is its determination to recognize these problems, and mobilize the resources to bring about change. The study was commissioned by the Boys' and Girls' Clubs of Newark, the lead agency in the Newark Fighting Back Initiative. The objective of this initiative is to develop intensive, community-wide activities that will help reduce local drug use and its attendant problems
On the consequences of toughness by Peter Reuter( Book )

4 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 94 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The American discussion of society's drug policy alternatives focuses on the extent of drug use. That is, when comparing alternative policies, emphasis seems to be given to which policy will result in the lower prevalence of drug use. This Note adopts instead a "harms minimization" criterion, asking what choices minimize the harms resulting from drug use and drug control. This approach takes account of the fact that many, though not all, of the adverse consequences of drug use are a function of the policies used to restrain that behavior. The evidence suggests that (1) general user sanctions have little deterrent effect; (2) vigorous enforcement against high-level dealers, smugglers, and refiners does little to raise the retail price, but may engender instability in producer countries, corruption in transit nations, and may select out the more suspicious distribution organizations in the United States; and (3) saturated enforcement against dealers in street markets increases the level of violence associated with such trafficking. The author concludes that policymakers should consider moving enforcement to the fringes of drug policy, aiming at getting dependent users into treatment and making drug dealing less conspicuous, and thus drugs less available to novice users
Improving data for Federal drug policy decisions by Rand Corporation( Book )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 92 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At the request of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP), RAND convened a conference of nongovernmental experts to develop a set of recommendations for federal data collection and analysis activities. This Note is the final report of that conference. The conference recommended that the federal government's planned expansion of data collection on the extent and consequences of illicit drug use be carried out in a way to ensure that policymakers have consistent and comparable data about different aspects of the problem. The conference also stressed the need to improve the quality of data analysis and dissemination. Finally, the report recommends a few new data collection activities
Drug use in the Detroit metropolitan area : problems, programs, and policy options by John Haaga( Book )

3 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 67 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report analyzes recent trends in drug use and drug-related problems in the Detroit metropolitan area (Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb counties), assesses the school and community-based programs currently dealing with drug use problems, discusses public and private treatment systems, and describes trends in drug law enforcement. Finally, it discusses the need to (1) devote more resources to prevention, (2) build coalitions across geographic and administrative boundaries, and (3) experiment, giving efforts a realistic amount of time to succeed. An appendix provides details on the sources of drug-use data
Drug use and drug policy futures : insights from a colloquium( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 33 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A system description of the marijuana trade by Michael T Childress( )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes and discusses applications for a computer spreadsheet-based, comprehensive "systems description" of the quantity and flow of marijuana from initial cultivation and processing, through international transportation, to domestic distribution. To examine the potential utility of this tool, this report details three distinct but related applications: improving the estimation processes, conducting sensitivity analyses, and guiding planning and assessment. In improving the estimation process, an analyst can use the framework to evaluate assumptions or data in terms of their downstream effects on other indicators (e.g., the likely downstream effects of an increase in the marijuana crop yields). Sensitivity analysis can be used to understand the impact of certain parameters versus others, which may be helpful in allocating intelligence resources, and to evaluate first-order effects of a change in the system, such as an eradication program. As a tool for more effective planning and assessment, the model can help planners think in terms of a strategic framework, for example, of linking assumptions on production in Southeast Asia to marijuana flows in the United States
The benefits and costs of drug use prevention : clarifying a cloudy issue( Book )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A system description of the heroin trade by Michael T Childress( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report describes and discusses applications for a computer spreadsheet-based, comprehensive "systems description" of the quantity and flow of heroin from initial cultivation and processing, through international transportation, to domestic distribution. To examine the potential utility of this tool, this report details three distinct but related applications: improving the estimation processes, conducting sensitivity analyses, and guiding planning and assessment. In improving the estimation process, an analyst can use the framework to evaluate assumptions or data in terms of their downstream effects on other indicators (e.g., the likely downstream effects of an increase in the opium crop yields). Sensitivity analysis can be used to understand the impact of certain parameters versus others, which may be helpful in allocating intelligence resources, and to evaluate first-order effects of a change in the system, such as an eradication program. As a tool for more effective planning and assessment, the model can help planners think in terms of a strategic framework, for example, of linking assumptions on production in Southeast Asia to heroin flows in the United States
Health care system response to prenatal substance use : an exploratory analysis( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Despite considerable public and media concern, little attention has been devoted to prevention or early detection of substance use during pregnancy. A limited literature suggests that this lack of attention stems from a lack of policies or procedures for systematically identifying substance-using pregnant women and substance-exposed neonates in health care institutions. This study was designed to generate exploratory data about health care provider response to prenatal substance exposure and to examine current substance detection policies and practices in health care institutions. Based on interviews in local hospitals, study data reveal many disincentives to detecting substance exposure. For the most part, detection policies are not being developed or implemented, although hospitals serving poor communities are more likely to have such policies. Policy implications are discussed, including the appropriateness of mandated detection policies and whether such policies should be developed at the state or federal level
Federal databases for use in drug policy research : a catalogue for data users by Patricia A Ebener( )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Data Catalogue includes descriptions of federally funded national or multiple-site studies that have collected drug-related data over a series of years. It contains surveys specifically targeting drug use and its consequences; health surveys that include items about drug use; law enforcement surveys that offer information on drug offenses, drug offense sentencing, and drug use among offenders; surveys of youth behavior that contain data on drug use; and substance abuse treatment surveys that include data on treatment providers and their clients. The authors gathered available documentation and talked with the sponsors of these data sets, the organizations that collect and process the data, and as many users as possible to become familiar with the series' design, sampling, and data collection approaches. The researchers also investigated computer file construction, availability of the data for secondary analysis, and publications. The Catalogue is "user friendly" and includes a number of helpful tables that categorize elements across databases (e.g., populations studied, time periods covered by the databases, and specific drugs monitored)
The U.S. drug policy landscape : insights and opportunities for improving the view by Rand Corporation( )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Discussions about reducing the harms associated with drug use and antidrug policies are often politicized, infused with questionable data, and unproductive. This paper provides a nonpartisan primer that should be of interest to those who are new to the field of drug policy, as well as those who have been working in the trenches. It begins with an overview of problems and policies related to illegal drugs in the United States, including the nonmedical use of prescription drugs. It then discusses the efficacy of U.S. drug policies and programs, including long-standing issues that deserve additional attention. Next, the paper lists the major funders of research and analysis in the area and describes their priorities. By highlighting the issues that receive most of the funding, this discussion identifies where gaps remain. Comparing these needs, old and new, to the current funding patterns suggests eight opportunities to improve understanding of drug problems and drug policies in the United States: (1) sponsor young scholars and strengthen the infrastructure of the field, (2) accelerate the diffusion of good ideas and reliable information to decision-makers, (3) replicate and evaluate cutting-edge programs in an expedited fashion, (4) support nonpartisan research on marijuana policy, (5) investigate ways to reduce drug-related violence in Mexico and Central America, (6) improve understanding of the markets for diverted pharmaceuticals, (7) help build and sustain comprehensive community prevention efforts, and (8) develop more sensible sentencing policies that reduce the excessive levels of incarceration for drug offenses and address the extreme racial disparities. The document offers some specific suggestions for researchers and potential research funders in each of the eight areas
Developing price series for cocaine by Jonathan P Caulkins( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How state medical marijuana laws vary : a comprehensive view( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prenatal cocaine exposure : scientific considerations and policy implications by Suzanne Wenzel( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New research has shown that children exposed to cocaine before birth are at risk of learning and behavioral problems. Such problems have broad implications for education, social welfare, and criminal justice in the United States. However, there are numerous opportunities to minimize prenatal cocaine exposure and its impacts and thus to enhance the well-being of women and their children. This report, a collaborative effort of the RAND Drug Policy Research Center and the New York Academy of Sciences, presents an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of cocaine on the developing brain and offers policy considerations for addressing the issues that arise from cocaine use by pregnant women. The report discusses three prevention strategies: primary prevention (preventing substance use before and during pregnancy); secondary prevention (identifying pregnant women who use drugs and minimizing their drug use); and tertiary prevention (reducing the adverse consequences of substance exposure in children who were exposed in utero). In addition, the report presents a number of areas where more research is needed and offers a rationale for making more resources available for women and children affected by cocaine
Testimony on drug treatment alternatives to incarceration by M. Y Iguchi( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Over the past several decades, lawmakers in the United States have responded to the drug epidemic with tougher laws and longer sentences in an attempt to deter drug use. The resulting increase in drug cases has seriously overloaded judicial dockets creating a need for reasoned alternatives. In 1992, the Drug Policy Research Center conducted a drug policy seminar game involving Florida public officials that anticipated this increase in cases as well as the need to provide drug abuse treatment within the criminal justice system. Players in that policy game focused, as we are doing today, on the need to provide criminal offenders with drug abuse treatment as an alternative to incarceration. This emphasis was consistent with our drug policy modeling work that indicated treatment may well be a more cost-effective way to spend additional funds intended to reduce cocaine use than other options, such as domestic enforcement, interdiction, or source country control
Controlling cocaine : supply versus demand programs by C. Peter Rydell( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This analysis examines only cocaine-control programs. That is a sufficiently ambitious undertaking, given the current state of the art of cost- effectiveness analyses of drug-control policies. However, the analytical methods used here are relevant to analyses of control programs for other illicit drugs, such as heroin and marijuana. Moreover, the programmatic conclusions of this study are likely to have analogues in those other drug-control efforts
 
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Private versus public sector insurance coverage for drug abuse
Covers
Private versus public sector insurance coverage for drug abuseSubstance abuse problems and programs in Newark : a needs assessment for Newark's Fighting Back InitiativeA system description of the marijuana tradePrenatal cocaine exposure : scientific considerations and policy implicationsControlling cocaine : supply versus demand programs
Alternative Names

controlled identityRAND Drug Policy Research Center

D.P.R.C. (Drug Policy Research Center)

DPRC

DPRC (Drug Policy Research Center)

Rand Corporation Drug Policy Research Center

Languages
English (43)