WorldCat Identities
Fri Mar 21 17:04:43 2014 UTClccn-n930291700.00Stetson Kennedy collection,0.291.00Negro education /137352669n 930291703345199Federal Writers' Project (Fla.)Florida Writers' ProjectUnited States. Work Projects Administration. Federal Writers' Project (Fla.)United States. Work Projects Administration. Florida Writers' ProjectWPA Florida Writers' Projectlccn-n79086453Hurston, Zora Nealelccn-n98063088Bordelon, Pamelalccn-n85826790Writers' Program (Fla.)lccn-n94087909Corse, Carita Doggett1892-np-miner, frances hMiner, Frances H.np-shepherd, roseShepherd, Rosenp-goebel, rubye kGoebel, Rubye K.np-simms, john aSimms, John A.np-huss, veronica eHuss, Veronica E.lccn-n79041716Catholic ChurchFederal Writers' Project of the Work Projects Administration for the State of FloridaLocal historyBibliographyGuidebooksHistoryInterviewsPersonal narrativesJuvenile worksFolkloreFloridaUnited StatesState flowersState songsNames, GeographicalSeals (Numismatics)FlagsCapitolsMottoesState birdsAfrican AmericansFederal Writers' Project of the Work Projects Administration for the State of FloridaHurston, Zora NealeArtTalesBirdsSlaverySlave narrativesMissionsIndians of North America--MissionsCatholic ChurchSlavesCooking (Fish)Sugar--Manufacture and refiningSugarTung oilCooking (Shellfish)Florida--Broward CountyTravelSeafoodCookingSoil conservationAgricultural conservationTung oil industryFlorida--PensacolaSugarcaneSlaves--Social conditionsFederal Writers' ProjectAfrican Americans--EducationRecreationAgriculture, CooperativeAfrican Americans--ReligionAfrican American churchesAutomobile travelAmerican literatureEmployeesFlorida--Hillsborough CountyFlorida--TampaCooking (Seafood)Authors, American19001908191119201924193019341935193619371938193919401941194419451946194719481949195019521955195619571973197619891990199119931997199920012004200520062008357211942003917.59F316114716ocn000485766book19390.28Federal Writers' Project of the Work Projects Administration for the State of FloridaFlorida; a guide to the southern-most stateHistoryGuidebooks291ocn027974460book19930.25The Spanish missions of FloridaHistory171ocn075956505file20060.63Federal Writers' ProjectFlorida narrativesInterviews169ocn041436699book19440.47FloridaFlorida seafood cookeryThis book deals with the purchasing, handling of fresh and frozen fish and seafood, it's preparation for cooking (and canning) and recipes+-+2111565696153ocn076050027book19360.28Miner, Frances HHistory of Broward CountyHistory102ocn015556664book19390.73Hadsell, Duane WTung oil industry in FloridaThe tung oil production in the past few years indicates a possible growth of this venture into a remunerative industry in localities best suited to tung tree culture. This publication explores the development of commercial tung oil production as a profitable industry in Florida96ocn015556863book19390.81Florida's sugar bowlRecently the commercial production of sugar in the State has developed to such an extent that Florida has become an important cane-sugar producing area of the nation. Practically, all sugar produced in the State is from cane grown in the region of the Everglades. This publication presents an overview of the process of manufacture and refining of sugar in Florida81ocn064696354book20050.25Florida narrativesInterviewsPersonal narratives71ocn275170572book20080.47Stories of Florida : prepared for use in public schools : a selection of original writings from 1935 - 1943HistoryJuvenile works75ocn015556845book19390.96Cooperative agricultureCooperative agriculture is an index of our times and seems an absolute necessity if the time-honored occupation of tilling the soil is to regain and maintain its status as a profitable endeavor. The significant point where cooperative agriculture departs from traditional methods, lies in the farmer's recognition that he must think in terms of national as well as individual production. For successful production, he must receive prices for his products commensurate with those the manufacturer charges for his products. Cooperative agriculture is today a practical formula by which the individual farmer, through marketing and purchasing, can turn his products into more profitable channels71ocn015556207book19410.94Pensacola recreation handbook714ocn034035635book19361.00Johnson, John MNegro education61ocn080381804book0.24Shankle, George EarlieState names, flags, seals, songs, birds, flowers, and other symbols; a study based on historical documents giving the origin and significance of the state names, nicknames, mottoes, seals, flags, flowers, birds, songs, and descriptive comments on the capitol buildings and on some of the leading state histories, with facsimiles of the state flags and sealsHistoryLocal historyBibliography"A study based on historical documents giving the origin and significance of the state names, nicknames, mottoes ... with facsimiles of the state flags and seals."613ocn034983244book19361.00Richardson, Martin DNegro ethnographyHistory612ocn034762076book19361.00Richardson, Martin DNegro churchesHistory510ocn035205463book19361.00Johnson, John MNegro historyHistory52ocn034724778book0.92Cochrane, HerndoneStories of Florida : Fort CarolineHistory42ocn006600752book0.73Federal Writers' Project of the Work Projects Administration for the State of FloridaThe Negro in Florida, 1528-1940HistoryFolklore41ocn008705271book19360.27History of Hillsborough CountyHistory42ocn044576385book19480.79Agricultural conservationAgricultural conservation has become synonymous with soil conservation to the American farmer of today. Such problems as crop rotation, crop control, and irrigation are still part of his daily occupation in tilling the land, but they have now been absorbed in the one factor which has become the most important in all agricultural programs10323ocn039523099book19990.25Hurston, Zora NealeGo gator and muddy the water : writingsFolkloreStories on the manners and mores of African-Americans in 1930s Florida. They were written when the author was employed by the federal government to transcribe the oral history and to collect data on the customs of black people. At the time, few of her stories made it into print+-+886368848551ocn024435890book19900.28Powell-Brant, Evanell KWPA Federal Writers' Project : with emphasis on the Florida writers and Carita Doggett CorseCriticism, interpretation, etc11ocn041422980rcrd19990.47[A Titanic woman Pamela Bordelon on Zora Neale Hurston ; Women's progress, 1989-1999]HistoryFolkloreInterviewsPart 2. Writer Zora Neale Hurston is largely responsible for preserving African American folklore from the 1930's and 40's South. Beth Engeler talks with an historian about Hurston's remarkable work for the Federal Writer's Project. (7:37)11ocn044763727visu19970.47Kennedy, StetsonPioneering in oral historyStetson Kennedy discusses the origins and methods of oral history and its role in historiography, and his own work in the field for the Florida Writers' Project in the 1930s. Followed by a question and answer period11ocn028540797book19910.47Bordelon, Pamela GThe Federal Writers' Project's mirror to America : the Florida reflectionHistoryBiographyFolkloreSources11ocn061355186mix0.47Corse, Carita DoggettPapersRecords and correspondenceThe Carita Doggett Corse papers consist of 15 linear feet of material relating to the Federal Writers' project in Florida which is comprised primarily of typescript copies of articles and research. Also included are papers related to the personal research of Dr. Corse into Dr. Andrew Turnbull as well as personal correspondence, photographs and papers related to the Jacksonville Historical Society11ocn026320028mix1.00Kennedy, StetsonStetson Kennedy papersBiographyRecords and correspondenceCorrespondence, 1938-1939, and other papers relating to the Florida office of the Federal Writers' Project, including letters exchanged by staff members Roland Phillips and Maxwell Hunter in Washington, D.C., and director Carita Doggett Corse, while the former were editing the state guide, specifically downplaying some of the more controversial aspects of race relations. The letters give insight into the operation of the Project and into the relationship between the state and national offices. Also included are thirty-three life histories and narratives generated by the project, all pertaining to Florida, four of which concern Mulberry Grove Plantation. In addition, there is scattered material (correspondence and writings), 1938-1945, relating to Stetson Kennedy's work for the Project and his later career; and a folder of miscellaneous material, 1938-1978, relating to African American folklorist Zora Neale Hurston11ocn062458428mix0.47Yonge, Julien ChandlerCorrespondenceRecords and correspondence11ocn070945673book1.00Tillotson, RoyChiefly descriptions of some newspapers and editors in Miami, Tampa, and Broward County written for the Florida Writers' Project11ocn011204688book19761.00Corse, Carita DoggettAn interview with the state Director of the Federal Writers' Project in Florida, Dr. Carita Doggett CorseInterviews11ocn044757080visu19970.47Kennedy, StetsonHolding a mirror to Florida my years with the WPA and the Florida Writers ProjectStetson Kennedy describes his work for the Federal Writers' Project of the Work Projects Administration for Florida in the early 1930s, collecting oral histories from people in Florida. Followed by a question and answer period01ocn076817787mixStetson Kennedy oral historyInterviewsStetson Kennedy was interviewed by Peggy A. Bulger, Director of the American Folklife Center, at an oral history workshop during the conference. Kennedy discusses the WPA Federal Writers' Project in Florida where he worked with Zora Neale Hurston and others in the 1930s; his infiltration of the Ku Klux Klan in Georgia during World War II; his books on the Ku Klux Klan and race relations in the South; his friendships with Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger; protest literature and political activism; and his travels in Europe in the 1950s. Kennedy mentions Alan Lomax, Benjamin Botkin, W.E.B. DuBois, Sterling Brown, and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, among others01ocn050657934mixKennedy, StetsonStetson Kennedy collectionCorrespondence, documents relating to the Ku Klux Klan, photographs, ephemera, articles, manuscripts of published and unpublished works, audio cassettes and VHS tapes. The collection is dedicated to Kennedy's wife, Joyce Ann+-+2111565696+-+2111565696Fri Mar 21 15:38:05 EDT 2014batch45169