WorldCat Identities

Idaho Department of Fish and Game

Overview
Works: 1,977 works in 3,055 publications in 1 language and 8,118 library holdings
Genres: Bathymetric maps  Maps  Periodicals  Observations 
Roles: Researcher
Classifications: SH222.I2, 599.74446
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Idaho
 
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Most widely held works by Idaho
Bathymetry, morphology, and lakebed geologic characteristics of potential Kokanee salmon spawning habitat in Lake Pend Oreille, Bayview, and Lakeview quadrangles, Idaho by Gary J Barton( )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 217 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A shadow in the forest : Idaho's black bear by John Beecham( Book )

3 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 195 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Did you know that Idaho's black bear are more active during the day than at night, that the bears diet is less than 2 percent meat and that the number of cubs born in the spring is related to the size of the fall berry crop? These are just a few of the facts the authors present about the black bear, a shy adaptable species whose secretive habits and preference for forested habitats has made it a difficult animal to observe. The authors have been collecting biological data since 1972 in order to develop a comprehensive management program for the state's black bear population, and this volume summarizes much of their research. As the black bear's range shrinks with man's encroachment into isolated areas, studies such as this one offer scientists and naturalists the necessary data to make informed decisions about successfully managing this unique and irreplaceable species of American wildlife. This volume will provide naturalists and general readers with information on and a greater understanding of the rare and elusive Idaho black bear
Spatial distribution of stream velocities for the Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, Idaho, June 1997 by Stephen W Lipscomb( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 147 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Snake River birds of prey by United States( Book )

4 editions published between 1985 and 1986 in English and held by 137 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Idaho wildlife( )

in English and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regional fisheries management investigations by Dale B Allen( Book )

13 editions published between 1983 and 2004 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regional fisheries management investigations by Paul J Janssen( Book )

10 editions published between 1988 and 2003 in English and held by 31 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Snake River sockeye salmon captive broodstock program, hatchery element : project progress report : 1999 annual report by Paul A Kline( Book )

15 editions published between 2003 and 2016 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Numbers of Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka have declined dramatically in recent years. In Idaho, only the lakes of the upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Valley) remain as potential sources of production (Figure 1). Historically, five Sawtooth Valley lakes (Redfish, Alturas, Pettit, Stanley, and Yellowbelly) supported sockeye salmon (Bjornn et al. 1968; Chapman et al. 1990). Currently, only Redfish Lake receives a remnant anadromous run. On April 2, 1990, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service (NOAA - formerly National Marine Fisheries Service) received a petition from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) to list Snake River sockeye salmon as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. On November 20, 1991, NOAA declared Snake River sockeye salmon endangered. In 1991, the SBT, along with the Idaho Department of Fish & Game (IDFG), initiated the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project (Sawtooth Valley Project) with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The goal of this program is to conserve genetic resources and to rebuild Snake River sockeye salmon populations in Idaho. Coordination of this effort is carried out under the guidance of the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee (SBSTOC), a team of biologists representing the agencies involved in the recovery and management of Snake River sockeye salmon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries Service ESA Permit Nos. 1120, 1124, and 1481 authorize IDFG to conduct scientific research on listed Snake River sockeye salmon. Initial steps to recover the species involved the establishment of captive broodstocks at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in Idaho and at NOAA facilities in Washington State (for a review, see Flagg 1993; Johnson 1993; Flagg and McAuley 1994; Kline 1994; Johnson and Pravecek 1995; Kline and Younk 1995; Flagg et al. 1996; Johnson and Pravecek 1996; Kline and Lamansky 1997; Pravecek and Johnson 1997; Pravecek and Kline 1998; Kline and Heindel 1999; Hebdon et al. 2000; Flagg et al. 2001; Kline and Willard 2001; Frost et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2002; Hebdon et al. 2003; Kline et al. 2003a; Kline et al. 2003b; Willard et al. 2003a; Willard et al. 2003b; Baker et al. 2004; Baker et al. 2005; Willard et al. 2005; Baker et al. 2006; Plaster et al. 2006; Baker et al. 2007). The immediate goal of the program is to utilize captive broodstock technology to conserve the population's unique genetics. Long-term goals include increasing the number of individuals in the population to address delisting criteria and to provide sport and treaty harvest opportunity. (1) Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake sockeye salmon, culture broodstocks and produce progeny for reintroduction. (2) Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward avoiding population extinction and increasing population abundance. (3) Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Sawtooth Valley lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program reintroduction efforts. (4) Utilize genetic analysis to discern the origin of wild and broodstock sockeye salmon to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. (5) Transfer technology through participation in the technical oversight committee process, provide written activity reports, and participate in essential program management and planning activities. Idaho Department of Fish and Game's participation in the Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program includes two areas of effort: (1) sockeye salmon captive broodstock culture, and (2) sockeye salmon research and evaluations. Although objectives and tasks from both components overlap and contribute to achieving the same goals, work directly related to sockeye salmon captive broodstock research and enhancement will appear under a separate cover. Research and enhancement activities associated with Snake River sockeye salmon are permitted under NOAA permit numbers 1120, 1124, and 1481. This report details fish culture information collected between January 1 and December 31, 2007
Regional fisheries management investigations : [McCall subregion] by Scott A Grunder( Book )

12 editions published between 1987 and 1995 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regional fisheries management investigations : Magic Valley Region (subprojects I-E, II-E, III-E, IV-E) by Charles D Warren( Book )

9 editions published between 1993 and 2004 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regional fishery management investigations : [region 6] by Melvin Reingold( Book )

11 editions published between 1977 and 1995 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Smolt monitoring at the head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam : annual report for 1990 operations by Edwin W Buettner( Book )

27 editions published between 1990 and 2012 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Mountain goat : study I, job 5 : July 1, 2004 to June 30, 2005( Book )

21 editions published between 1982 and 2009 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bighorn sheep : July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003( Book )

21 editions published between 1983 and 2003 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regional fisheries management investigations Panhandle Region (subprojects I-A, II-A, III-A, IV-A) by Lance E Nelson( Book )

10 editions published between 1993 and 2004 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regional fisheries management investigations : Clearwater Region (Subprojects I-B, II-B) by Ed Schriever( Book )

8 editions published between 1996 and 2003 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Regional fishery management investigations by Robert J Bell( Book )

7 editions published between 1977 and 1984 in English and held by 23 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kootenai River white sturgeon investigation : annual progress report, period covered: January 1, 1994 to December 31, 1994 by Vaughn L Paragamian( Book )

7 editions published between 1995 and 2001 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Flows in the Kootenai River for white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus spawning in 1998 were expected to be at a minimum because the snow pack in the basin was only about 79% normal, and local inflow was expected to be very low, <142 m³/s (5,000 cfs). Flows in the Kootenai River at Bonners Ferry from late April through early May were at about 425 m³/s (15,000 cfs) while water temperature ranged from about 8 to 10 C (45 to 50 F). Spawning and incubation flows from Libby Dam began on May 18 when flow at the dam was brought up to 765 m³/s (27,000 cfs). Unusually frequent rains and several enormous storms brought peak flows at Bonners Ferry to over 1,175 m³/s (41,500 cfs) on May 27, temperature ranged between 8 and 10.6 C (45 to 51 F). Flow gradually subsided at Bonners Ferry during June and was steady at 708 to 765 m³/s (25,000 to 27,000 cfs) while temperature gradually rose to 14.4 C (58 F). Forty-seven adult white sturgeon were captured with 4,220 hours of angling and setlining effort between March 1 and April 15, 1998 by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Sonic and radio tags were attached to four female and five male sturgeon during this effort. From April 1 through July 31, 1998, a total of 17 fish were monitored specifically for pre-spawn and spawning activities. White sturgeon spawning location, timing, frequency, and habitat were evaluated by sampling for eggs with artificial substrate mats. Four hundred and eighty-four eggs were collected, 393 eggs (81%) were collected on 60 standard mats, and 91 eggs (19%) were collected on seven experimental mats with drift nets. Ten eggs collected with experimental mats were found mixed with sand, suggesting eggs are moving in the lower water column with sand. The middle Shorty's Island reach (rkm 229.6-231.5) produced the most eggs (173) while the Deep Creek section (rkm 237.6-240.5) produced 112 eggs. No eggs were collected above the Deep Creek section (>rkm 240.5). Four hundred and twenty (87%) of the 484 white sturgeon eggs collected in 1998 were viable. Development ranged from stage 12 to 28 (1 h to 12 d old), with 95% of the viable eggs at stage 21 (about 2.4 days) or earlier. The oldest egg was estimated at 293 hours old or about 12 days. Based on ages of viable eggs and the dates of egg collection, we estimated that white sturgeon spawned during at least 20 days in 1998. The first spawning episode was estimated to have occurred on May 6. The next episode was estimated to have occurred May 7 with a gap in spawning until May 10. Thereafter, spawning occurred for the next three days with a second break. From May 22, spawning occurred nearly every day through June 6. Peak spawning appeared to occur between from May 23 through May 28. Juvenile sampling yielded 163 individual fish (several fish were recaptured) of which 160 were hatchery and three wild sturgeon recruited from flow test years. Food habit studies of hatchery age-3 sturgeon indicated Chironomids comprised about 36% of the total food items by number while the Ephemeropterans Ephemerellidae and Baetidae contributed 22%. Continuous seismic profiling of a 12-km (7.45 mi) reach of the Kootenai River (rkm 228-240) indicated the riverbed was comprised primarily of fine and coarse sand. There was no evidence to suggest pre-dam gravels were overlain with sand. Recommendations for the 1999 spawning season include coordinating the flow test with sturgeon behavior and river temperatures of 8-10 C (46-50 F), and discharge should be in increments of 57 m³/s (2,000 cfs) per day to a minimum of 1,130 m³/s (40,000 cfs) at Bonners Ferry. We also recommend no load following
Simulation of hydraulic characteristics in the white sturgeon spawning habitat of the Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, Idaho by Charles Berenbrock( )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Surveying cross sections of the Kootenai River between Libby Dam, Montana, and Kootenay Lake, British Columbia, Canada by Gary J Barton( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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A shadow in the forest : Idaho's black bear
Alternative Names

controlled identityIdaho. Fish and Game Department

Idaho. Dept. of Fish and Game

Idaho Fish & Game

Idaho Fish and Game

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English (210)

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