WorldCat Identities

Arroyo Center

Overview
Works: 448 works in 857 publications in 1 language and 61,778 library holdings
Genres: History  Forecasts  Military history 
Roles: Editor
Classifications: UA25, 355.2232071173
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Arroyo Center Publications about Arroyo Center
Publications by Arroyo Center Publications by Arroyo Center
Most widely held works by Arroyo Center
The zapatista "social netwar" in Mexico by David F Ronfeldt ( )
4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1,738 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The information revolution is leading to the rise of network forms of organization in which small, previously isolated groups can communicate, link up, and conduct coordinated joint actions as never before. This in turn is leading to a new mode of conflict--"netwar"--In which the protagonists depend on using network forms of organization, doctrine, strategy, and technology. Many actors across the spectrum of conflict--from terrorists, guerrillas, and criminals who pose security threats, to social activists who may not--are developing netwar designs and capabilities. The Zapatista movement in Mexico is a seminal case of this. In January 1994, a guerrilla-like insurgency in Chiapas by the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN), and the Mexican government's response to it, aroused a multitude of civil-society activists associated with human-rights, indigenous-rights, and other types of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to "swarm"--electronically as well as physically--from the United States, Canada, and elsewhere into Mexico City and Chiapas. There, they linked with Mexican NGOs to voice solidarity with the EZLN's demands and to press for nonviolent change. Thus, what began as a violent insurgency in an isolated region mutated into a nonviolent though no less disruptive "social netwar" that engaged the attention of activists from far and wide and had nationwide and foreign repercussions for Mexico. This study examines the rise of this social netwar, the information-age behaviors that characterize it (e.g., extensive use of the Internet), its effects on the Mexican military, its implications for Mexico's stability, and its implications for the future occurrence of social netwars elsewhere around the world
Staffing Army ROTC at colleges and universities alternatives for reducing the use of active-duty soldiers ( )
5 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 1,533 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The increased tempo and range of military operations, coupled with reduced manning levels, are exerting pressure on the Army to use its active-duty soldiers optimally. Consequently, the Army is seeking opportunities to fill positions now occupied by active-duty soldiers with other personnel. Specifically, a recent Armywide Institutional I TDA Redesign Study called for the design and testing of staffing alternatives for the Senior Reserve Officer Training Corps (SROTC) program using a combination of Active Component, Reserve Component, or former military personnel. In support of this requirement, RAND was asked to develop staffing alternatives and design a test of their effectiveness. This report discusses such alternatives and describes a test design to assess their feasibility for implementation throughout SROTC
Allocating scholarships for Army ROTC by Charles A Goldman ( )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,529 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In the face of rising tuition costs and the increased importance of scholarships to meeting its commission mission, the Army designed a new scholarship program, known as the tiered scholarship program because it offered four different scholarship values (called tiers). Under the new program, enrollments at public colleges increased modestly and the Army controlled the total scholarship cost. But as feared, many fewer of the nation's most academically able students enrolled in ROTC, and the programs at the nation's most prestigious private colleges and universities were facing the prospect of closure. Based on these findings, the authors recommended and the Army implemented a high-value scholarship targeted to some prestigious private colleges. The study also analyzes several complete scholarship programs to replace the tiered scholarships. The analysis supports plans that continue to offer high-value scholarships at some prestigious private schools, while offering lower values at other schools. Although it would entail some significant tradeoffs, the authors have also presented a plan that would offer greater values to in-state students at public schools--a large potential market, especially if tuition increases in the private schools do not abate in the decade ahead. These offers would require congressional approval because the law currently prohibits the use of scholarships for room and board, which constitute the largest portion of these in-state students' expenses to attend college
Consolidating active and reserve component training infrastructure ( )
3 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 1,478 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
As part of a research project entitled "Evolution of the Total Army School System," this report examines ways to consolidate training infrastructure and augment capabilities across components to gain efficiency and achieve economies of scale in conducting individual training of Active Component (AC) and Reserve Component (RC) soldiers. Using an optimization model, the researchers examined three options in the area of maintenance-related training, focusing on RC Regional Training Sites-Maintenance (RTS-Ms) and the AC proponent schools offering maintenance courses. Results suggest that permitting AC and RC students to take courses at the nearest accredited school (AC school or RTS-M) has both economic and morale/cultural benefits. The former include reductions in travel, per-diem, and potential instructor costs. The latter include reductions in the time AC students spend away from their homes and units, lower training workloads for AC instructors, and more interaction, potentially building trust and confidence across components. Such interaction could also provide benefits in functional areas beyond maintenance, such as combat service support. Based on the analyses, the researchers recommend a pilot test to better understand the options and policy implications
The U.S. Army and the new national security strategy by Lynn E Davis ( )
4 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 1,448 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
How is the U.S. Army changing to fulfill its role in light of the new national security strategy? How must it change further to better accomplish its manifold and varied missions? How did the attacks of September 11, 2001, alter or accelerate the need for change? Is the Army's far-reaching program for change known as the Army Transformation on the right track? Fourteen RAND analysts with broad experience in strategic and Army planning have undertaken to answer these questions. In this book, the authors use nine chapters to examine the Army's role in the offensive war on terrorism; the Army's homeland security needs; the implications for the Army of the increase in emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region; the Army's role in coalition operations; the unfinished business of jointness-the lessons to be learned from recent Army operations and how the Army can better prepare for the future; the Army's deployability, logistical, and personnel challenges; and whether the Army can afford the Transformation as currently envisaged. These chapters are bracketed by a concise introduction, a description of the new national security strategy and the Army's place in it, and a succinct summary of the authors' conclusions. This book is nothing less than a call for the Army to change and a prescription for what needs to be done
Issues raised during the Army after next spring wargame by Walt L Perry ( )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,443 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Army After Next (AAN) project, led by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), was initiated by the Chief of Staff of the Army (CSA) in February 1996. The project's goals are to link Army XXI to a long-term vision of the Army extending well into the next century, and to ensure that this vision informs evolving Army research and development requirements. At the request of the TRADOC's Deputy Chief of Staff for Doctrine (DCSDOC), RAND Arroyo Center is supporting TRADOC in this effort. As part of the AAN project, TRADOC is conducting a series of high level wargames to explore issues affecting the development of the U.S. Army after about 2010. The 1998 Spring Wargame is the third game in the series. All of these games have been held at the Center for Strategic Leadership at the Army War College. The Arroyo Center's role in the 1998 Spring Wargame is to assist TRADOC by (1) participating with the TRADOC Analysis Center (TRAC) in the development of the wargame Analysis Plan; (2) identifying the issues, derived from the game objectives, that were explored in the game; (3) participating with TRAC in the development of the Emerging Impressions Report; and (4) assessing game results. This report documents the Arroyo Center's analysis of the data collected during the game, and information gathered from various sources since the completion of the game, including our Initial Impressions Report (PM-809-A) and TRAC's Emerging Impressions Report to TRADOC. This report analyzes major issues and insights arising from the game and offers recommendations to improve the AAN process
Improving the Army planning, programming, budgeting, and execution system (PPBES) the programming phase by Leslie Lewis ( )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,434 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
As part of a special assistance activity for the Director of the U.S. Army's Program Analysis and Evaluation Directorate (PA&E), the Arroyo Center participated in creating a new program development process and methodology. The principal objective in this work was to improve the Army's Program Objective Memorandum (POM) development process. The improvements were designed to (1) enhance the Army's ability to view the totality of its resources, (2) improve its resource decision process, and (3) justify those choices within the Army and to the external community, including the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Congress
Use of public-private partnerships to meet future Army needs ( )
4 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 1,406 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Arroyo Center was asked to assist Army Materiel Command by creating a strategy for managing the development of advanced technologies, with special attention to the changing future environment for research and development. In previous phases of this project, the authors showed that the Army has significant opportunities to do collaborative research with industry. Moreover, they documented new concepts the Army can use to implement a collaborative policy and showed how effective those concepts would be in attracting nontraditional suppliers. In this report, the authors expand on the notion of a collaborative research strategy and discuss the utility of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the management and development of Army infrastructure, intellectual property, and financial arrangements. They discuss how PPPs can benefit the Army through opportunities to leverage assets, reduce costs, create new assets or capabilities, be an alternative approach to Base Realignment and Closure Actions, and generate revenue. The federal government has begun to recognize the mutually beneficial returns of such partnerships. For the past two decades, legislative changes and actions by federal agencies have together created an environment more conducive to PPPs. Moreover, the continued growth of PPPs at the local government level will spur federal bodies such as the Army to engage in more PPPs in the future. As the use of PPPs grows, more innovation is also likely in order to accommodate the variety of situations in which PPPs will be applied. Some innovations will be extensions of existing programs, others will be borrowed from the academic or commercial worlds, and some will be completely new concepts. As PPP innovations emerge, the Army will have to evaluate new concepts with respect to feasibility and the benefits each concept is likely to bring. These evaluations can be combined to yield a strategic approach to expanding the Army's use of PPPs
Microworld simulations for command and control training of theater logistics and support staffs a curriculum strategy ( )
5 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 1,365 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report discusses changes in training structure, content, and methods, with the focus on developing training for CSS staffs operating as staffs, not for individual training. The focus is on large unit staffs: corps and echelons above corps headquarters and support commands. The document discusses shortcomings of the current approach to CSS staff training, and then proposes a process-oriented approach. It illustrates how microworld models can be used to train CSS processes. It then goes on to describe how pilot testing of prototype models indicates that this approach is feasible for large unit staffs. It concludes with a proposed training strategy that the authors believe is more appropriate and useful for meeting the challenges posed to the Army by personnel turbulence, split-based operations, increased reliance on information, and decreased training resources. The authors believe this approach has applications beyond the CSS training environment. They argue that the microworld models in a carefully designed training strategy are appropriate to any business that needs to train staff under distributed conditions in uncertain environments and to avoid time- and resource-intensive costs of bringing staff together for a large game in a central location
Meeting peace operations' requirements while maintaining MTW readiness by Jennifer M Taw ( )
2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 1,305 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Peace operations (POs) are arguably the military operations other than war most likely to stress the U.S. Army's ability to maintain combat readiness. POs require: a higher ratio of combat support/combat service support units and special operations forces relative to combat arms units than do major theater wars (MTWs); smaller, more tailored deployments; training for some new tasks and, more important, for a more restrictive and sensitive operational environment; and readier access to--and more of--some kinds of equipment (such as crowd and riot-control gear, nonlethal weapons, and vehicles). At a time when the Army is shrinking, changing its posture, and participating in a rising number of both exercises and operational deployments, its challenge is to both maintain MTW readiness (its primary mission) and meet the very different requirements of POs. As long as MTWs remain the national priority--and thus the Army's--the Army can make some marginal changes to force structure, training, and doctrine that will help improve PO performance while also mitigating the effects of PO deployments on MTW readiness. If POs become a higher priority, and resources remain constrained, the Army will have to trade off some MTW capabilities to better meet PO requirements. These challenges must also be viewed in light of existing Army problems (such as maintaining units at levels below normal strength and overestimating the readiness of the reserve component), which transcend POs but are severely exacerbated by PO deployments
Preparing the U.S. Army for homeland security concepts, issues, and options by Eric V Larson ( )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1,278 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Homeland security encompasses five distinct missions: domestic preparednessand civil support in case of attacks on civilians, continuity of government, continuity ofmilitary operations, border and coastal defense, and national missile defense. This reportextensively details four of those mission areas (national missile defense having beencovered in great detail elsewhere). The authors define homeland security and its missionareas, provide a methodology for assessing homeland security response options, and reviewrelevant trend data for each mission area. They also assess the adequacy of the doctrine,organizations, training, leadership, materiel, and soldier systems and provide illustrativescenarios to help clarify Army planning priorities. The report concludes with options andrecommendations for developing more cost-effective programs and recommends a planningframework that can facilitate planning to meet homeland security needs
Understanding commanders' information needs for influence operations by Eric V Larson ( )
5 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 1,247 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Documents a study whose goals were to develop an understanding of commanders' information requirements for cultural and other "soft" factors in order to improve the effectiveness of combined arms operations, and to develop practical ways for commanders to integrate information and influence operations activities into combined arms planning/assessment in order to increase the usefulness to ground commanders of such operations
Seeking nontraditional approaches to collaborating and partnering with industry ( )
3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 1,150 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The US Army has a growing need to collaborate and partner with industry. This text describes three non-traditional approaches to that goal: forming real-estate, public-private partnerships; using Army venture capital mechanisms; and spinning of Army activities into federal government corporations
Protecting the homeland insights from Army wargames by Richard Brennan ( )
1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1,134 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
RAND Arroyo Center has analyzed US Army Training and Doctrine Command's programme of homeland security games, seminars, and workshops. The issues raised here highlight emerging threats and vulnerabilities to the physical security of the USA
Leader development in Army units views from the field by Peter Schirmer ( )
2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,100 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Summarizes discussions with over 450 Army officers (lieutenants through colonels) about leader development in Army units. These discussions revealed that the type and extent of leader development activities vary greatly across units, but that they are generally informal and most heavily influenced by the unit commander. The authors conclude with suggestions on how the Army school system can improve leader development
Army biometric applications identifying and addressing sociocultural concerns by John D Woodward ( )
5 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 1,097 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Every human possesses virtually infallible forms of identification. Known as biometrics, examples include fingerprints. The US Army has undertaken an assessment of how it can use biometrics to improve security, efficiency and convenience. This report examines the sociocultural concerns that arise
Urban battle command in the twenty-first century by Russell W Glenn ( )
5 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 1,087 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Urban areas are notorious for complicating operational planning, command, control, and the communications that facilitate the three. Frequent interruptions of line of sight due to the prolificacy of man-made structures interfere with radio and global positioning system signals. They often combine with extreme noise, dust, smoke, and light conditions to impede leader control at all echelons. The density of noncombatants and their potentially crucial influence on friendly force success further demand effective employment and synchronization of psychological operations, civil affairs, public affairs, and other resources. Savvy use of existent systems, employing decentralized control procedures, and innovation all have their place in overcoming these inherent limitations in the service of achieving objectives across the spectrum of conflict
Green warriors Army environmental considerations for contingency operations from planning through post-conflict by David E Mosher ( )
3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,082 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Recent experiences in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Balkans have highlighted the importance of environmental considerations. These range from protecting soldier health and disposing of hazardous waste to building water supply systems and other activities that help achieve national goals in the post-conflict phase of contingency operations. The Army has become increasingly involved with environmental issues in every contingency operation and must be better prepared to deal with them. This study assesses whether existing policy, doctrine, and guidance adequately address environmental activities in
Integrating civilian agencies in stability operations ( )
3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 1,039 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
RAND Arroyo Center examined the question of how the Army can help make key civilian agencies more capable partners in the planning and execution of stability, security, transition, and reconstruction (SSTR) operations. The authors identify the primary and secondary civilian agencies that should be involved in strategic-level planning and implementation of SSTR operations. Then, relying on available information on Provincial Reconstruction Teams and using a variety of federal databases, the authors identify the skill sets needed for the envisioned Field Advance Civilian Teams and where these skills reside in the federal government. The authors then assess the capacity of the main civilian agencies to participate in SSTR operations and analyze the recurring structural problems that have plagued their attempts to do so. The authors suggest a series of options that are worth considering in order to improve the current situation. Even without much action at the national level, the Army can still improve the situation by improving Army Civil Affairs and by executing a well-thought-out strategy of liaison officers assigned to the civilian agencies most important for SSTR operations
Human resource management and Army recruiting analyses of policy options by James N Dertouzos ( )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 863 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
U.S. Army Recruiting Command is faced with the challenge of ensuring that the flow of qualified volunteers is adequate to meet future active-duty accession requirements. This report documents research methods, findings, and policy conclusions from a project analyzing human resource management options for improving recruiting production. It details research designed to develop new insights to help guide future recruiter management policies
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.41 (from 0.10 for A campaign ... to 0.81 for Arroyo Cen ...)
Alternative Names
Rand corporation. Arroyo center
Languages
English (67)
Covers