WorldCat Identities

Wraga, William G. 1957-

Overview
Works: 14 works in 36 publications in 1 language and 970 library holdings
Genres: History  Biographies  Academic theses  Abstracts  Periodicals 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: LA222, 373.73
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by William G Wraga
Research review for school leaders by William G Wraga( )

12 editions published between 2000 and 2016 in English and held by 662 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This volume offers the educational leader reviews of research on five timely educational issues: citizenship education, multicultural education, gifted and talented education, classroom assessment, and scheduling. The chapters treating citizenship education review both the research about and practice of citizenship education in k-12 schooling. Closely related to the civic mission of public schooling is the task of fostering a sense of social cohesion among the diverse individuals and groups that compose this multicultural society. Issues of research and practice of multicultural education are reviewed in part ii. The education of another recognized subgroup in the student population, gifted and talented youth, is examined in part iii. Among the pressures placed on the public schools during the past 20 years, none, perhaps, has been greater than the demand to raise standardized test scores. Part iv presents in-depth reviews of research about various dimensions of classroom assessment. Finally, as assessment generally affects nearly all aspects of a local educational program, so does scheduling. With the sudden emergence of renewed interest in block scheduling, a review of research on block scheduling and of other scheduling options is handled in part V. (Contains 60 pages of references.) (dfr)
Democracy's high school : the comprehensive high school and educational reform in the United States by William G Wraga( Book )

5 editions published between 1993 and 1994 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Progressive pioneer : Alexander James Inglis (1879-1924) and American secondary education by William G Wraga( Book )

5 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 117 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Research review for school leaders( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Who Wrote the Cardinal Principles Report? The Commission on the Reorganization of Secondary Education Revisited by William G Wraga( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This study refutes Edward A. Krug's view of the primary authorship of the document created by the Commission on the Reorganization of Secondary Education in 1918. In general, the commission endorsed cardinal principles that emphasized the practical over the intellectual as well as the importance of social control and social efficiency. The document was well received and highly influential until it began to be criticized by education scholars in the 1950s. In addition to concerns about the content of the document, Krug offered evidence that the document was primarily influenced by one member, rather than representing the ideas of the whole commission. He pointed out that one member, Clarence Kingsley, was a follower of David Snedden, whose ideas resemble those propounded by the commission. Krug's evidence is examined point by point and disputed. Similar ideas are found in sources other than Snedden, and documentation is offered to show that other members made substantive contributions to the final report. (Contains 96 references.) (RKJ)
What Makes Educational Leadership "Educational"? by William G Wraga( Book )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The processes of educational leadership are educative when they both educate constituents and are informed by feedback from constituents; when they are conducted as an ongoing exercise of participatory problem solving. In short, educational leadership is educational when both its ends and its means are educative. John Dewey provided a theoretical rationale for this condition of educational leadership, and recent research provides evidence to suggest that when school leaders employ participative forms of decision making, schools are more likely to achieve their educational purposes. Recently, the educational leadership field has begun to give increasing credence to the central importance of educational dimensions of the school administrator's work. For example, during the last two decades, commitment to a managerial focus on the administration of school has begun to yield to a new conception of educational leadership, which abandons top-down decision making in favor of collaborative approaches to problem solving which recognize the central importance of curriculum and instruction in the life of the school. The paper recommends that educational leadership preparation programs revise their curricula and redirect resources to equip prospective leaders with the capacities to lead in this manner. (Contains 24 references.) (Sm)
Democratic Leadership in the Classroom Theory into Practice by William G Wraga( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper suggests that for students to become accustomed to democratic habits of thought and conduct, they must continually practice them throughout the course of their school career. The daily interaction between the teacher and the pupil can influence the formation of attitudes and habits essential to democratic citizenship. For teachers, the challenge lies in conducting the classroom as democratically as possible within the parameters of the authority that the state exercises over students to meet this challenge, the teacher must practice democratic leadership in the classroom. For example, the teacher can involve students in devising classroom rules, perhaps in the form of writing and signing a classroom constitution and can provide students some choice in assignments related to particular purposes or subject matter. In a problem-or-issues-focused unit the teacher can allow for student discretion in the matter of selecting problems to study. If relations among students or between teachers and students are not going well, the teacher can solicit student suggestions about the source and possible solution to the problem. The democratic classroom provides structured conditions for students to develop habits of reflective thinking that enable them to make informed decisions about pending personal and social actions. In a democratic classroom, all students are entitled to equal and fair treatment and to equal opportunity to contribute to group decisions and class discussions. Commitment to the principle of individualism requires that the democratic classroom experience dignifies the integrity of the individual learner. The teacher cultivates self control and self discipline in students by providing them structured opportunities to exercise these habits. Contains 11 references. (BT)
Historical Perspectives on the ' Reconceptualization' of Curriculum Studies by William G Wraga( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A particular historical account of the "reconceptualization" of the curriculum field has prevailed since advocates of this movement began promoting it in the late 1970s. The standard account is that two developments have led to the demise of the curriculum field and education reform. First, leaders of national reform excluded curriculum specialists in favor of cognate field specialists under the auspices of the National Science Foundation (nsf) in the 1960s. In the next decade, economic recession, leading to cutbacks, further marginalized the traditional curriculum field. Moreover, "reconceptualists" insist that traditional curriculum was designed to maintain the existing social order. Alternative historical perspectives indicate a commitment to democratic forms of educational leadership and that scientific management practices associated with social control were more influential in the field of education administration. Curriculum history written during the 1960s and 1970s may reflect the prevailing disillusionment with traditional institutions in America at that time. Curriculum histories of this period often tied their critique of the curriculum past to events of the curriculum present, drawing direct connections between the 1920s and 1970s while effectively ignoring the intervening decades. Until reconceptualized curriculum theorists confront the historically problematic assumptions of their theory, the events of the 1970s will be better understood not as a true paradigm shift but as a movement resonating in the prevailing sociopolitical milieu. Contains 93 notes. (Lh)
Annual review of research for school leaders, 1998( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The comprehensive high school in the United States since midcentury by William G Wraga( )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Comprehensive High School in the United States A Historical Perspective by William G Wraga( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The key to understanding the history of the comprehensive high school in the United States necessitates understanding that the comprehensive model has not been implemented as its inventors intended. Moreover, since the mid-20th century most scholarship on the comprehensive high school model has effectively dismissed the model as an antidemocratic and anti-intellectual survival from a less sophisticated, misguided educational policy. This paper provides a lengthy synopsis of the history of the comprehensive high school in the United States, together with a summary of prevailing historical interpretations of the comprehensive high school. It also details five misrepresentations of the historic record engendered by a confusion of consequences and intentions: (1) authorship of the Cardinal Principles Report; (2) social efficiency slant; (3) tracking; (4) anti-subject matter and anti-intellectualism; and (5) the forgotten elaboration of the comprehensive model. An appendix illustrates a proposal for a dual system of secondary education sponsored by the National Association of Manufacturers. (Contains 75 references.) (DFR)
What's the Problem with a "Rigorous Academic Curriculum"? by William G Wraga( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This analysis identifies six problems with the the popular terms "rigorous academic curriculum" and "academic rigor": they bear multiple meanings, they contain negative connotations, they are survivals from the discredited learning theory called mental discipline, they have more to do with status than substance, they refer to an over-narrow conception of curriculum, and they are imprecise--that is, by definition, the term "rigorous academic curriculum" is not an academically rigorous term. The paper concludes with a proposal to set new terms for students' school experiences, namely, a call for a "vigorous educative curriculum."
Annual review of research for school leaders by Peter S Hlebowitsh( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Research review for school leaders( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Research review for school leaders
Covers
Progressive pioneer : Alexander James Inglis (1879-1924) and American secondary educationResearch review for school leadersAnnual review of research for school leaders, 1998Research review for school leaders
Languages
English (36)