WorldCat Identities

ERIC/OSEP Special Project

Overview
Works: 36 works in 51 publications in 1 language and 2,930 library holdings
Genres: Directories  Life skills guides 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about ERIC/OSEP Special Project
 
Most widely held works by ERIC/OSEP Special Project
OSEP grants and funding resources( )

in English and held by 232 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This database contains a list of ED and OSEP grants and funding resources
Developing Social Competence for All Students by Claudia G Vincent( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 198 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest describes the challenges of social skills instruction and provides three strategies for improving the social competence of all students, including children with disabilities. It begins by emphasizing the importance of teaching individual social skills within the context of establishing a school-wide culture of social competence. To establish a school climate acceptable to all, schools are urged to form a team representing all members of the school community to define school-wide behavioral expectations. Expectations should address the most frequently observed problem behaviors across all school settings, be condensed into three to five short and easy to remember statements, be age appropriate, and be positively stated. The second strategy for improving social competence is to provide students with social skills lessons targeting key behaviors in specific situations. The role of the teacher in requiring appropriate classroom behavior is discussed. The third strategy for improving social competence of all children is to match the level and intensity of instruction to students' needs. Functional behavioral assessment is recommended for identifying events and conditions triggering specific behaviors and the functions maintaining the behavior. Teachers are urged to use this information in designing and implementing individual behavior support plans. (Contains 12 references.) (CR)
Critical behaviors and strategies for teaching culturally diverse students by Jane Burnette( )

3 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 196 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest reviews behaviors and instructional strategies that enable teachers to build stronger teaching/learning relationships with students from culturally diverse backgrounds. Strategies include: (1) appreciate and accommodate the similarities and differences among the students' cultures; (2) build relationships with students; (3) focus on the ways students learn, and observe students to identify their task orientations; (4) teach students to match their behaviors to the setting; (5) use a variety of instructional strategies and learning activities; (6) consider students' cultures and language skills when developing learning objectives and instructional activities; (7) incorporate objectives for affective and personal development; (8) communicate expectations; (9) provide rationales; (10) use advance- and post-organizers; (11) provide frequent reviews of the content learned; (12) facilitate independence in thinking and action; (13) promote student on-task behavior; (14) monitor students' academic progress during lessons and independent work; (15) provide frequent feedback; and (16) require students to master one task before going on to the next. (CR)
Teaching English-language learners with learning difficulties : guiding principles and examples from research-based practice by Russell Monroe Gersten( Book )

3 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 193 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This guide provides practical information for teachers and others working with students who have learning difficulties (such as learning or language disabilities) and for whom English is a second language. Emphasis is on productive instructional strategies and approaches. The book is based on results of focus groups comprised of practicing teachers as well as a review of the research literature on effective instructional practices with English-language learners. Following an introductory chapter, the underlying concepts of "comprehensible input" and "meaningful access to the general curriculum" are explained in the next two chapters. Chapter 4 addresses problems in trying to provide meaningful access through comprehensible input, whereas chapter 5 considers approaches to increasing meaningful access through comprehensible input. Chapter 6 focuses on the teaching of academic language and chapter 7 offers useful initial teaching strategies. The following chapter considers what teachers can do to provide meaningful access to the general curriculum. Chapter 9 offers specific strategies to build comprehension and other language abilities. The final chapter explains key instructional principles such as teacher "think alouds" and modeling, use of concrete examples to explain concepts, importance of consistent language, the need to balance cognitive and language demands, and the value of peers in language development. (Contains 54 references.) (Db)
Learning strategies by Daniel J Boudah( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 116 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest discusses what research says about learning strategies and how teachers can teach learning strategies. A learning strategy is defined as an individual's way of reorganizing and using a particular set of skills in order to learn content or accomplish other tasks more effectively and efficiently in school and nonacademic settings. Studies which have demonstrated that development of learning strategies can be effective in improving the performance of students with learning disabilities in inclusive settings are cited, as are studies demonstrating the effectiveness of specific learning strategies such as reciprocal teaching and mnemonics. A specific instructional sequence for teaching students a multiple-step learning strategy is explained. The learning strategies curriculum, which was developed at the University of Kansas, is described as organized into three strands: (1) information acquisition, (2) information storage, and (3) expression and demonstration of understanding. (Contains 12 references.) (DB)
Including students with disabilities in large-scale testing : emerging practices by Mary K Fitzsimmons( Book )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 110 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This brief identifies practices that include students with disabilities in large-scale assessments as required by the reauthorized and amended 1997 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. It notes relevant research by the National Center on Educational Outcomes and summarizes major findings of studies funded by the U.S. Office of Special Education Programs concerning appropriate accommodations, alternate assessments, and reporting of results. In the area of appropriate accommodations, the paper finds great variations across disability groups and from district to district and state to state. Efforts to embed curriculum-based measurement into the process, develop a classification of accommodations, and create standardized methods for determining accommodation validity are summarized. Addressing alternate assessments, the paper notes efforts in Kentucky to use portfolio assessments and in Maryland to measure outcomes that are life-skills oriented. Concerning the reporting of results, the paper describes an effort in Long Beach, California, to tie large-scale assessments to school effectiveness policies and include all special education students. (DB)
Addressing diversity in special education research by Cheryl Anita Rose Utley( Book )

1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 102 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest reviews scientific and methodological problems in special education research related to race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. The first section of the digest discusses the various definitions of race, ethnicity, culture, and socioeconomic status. The problems with current race classification and the difficulties in determining the true economic status of families are highlighted. The second section of the digest examines epistemological issues that special education researchers should consider. Presumptions related to the use of racial categorization and inferences made to explain differences in group data are discussed. The paper emphasizes the critical need to use value-neutral methods of data collection and interpretation to ensure that research findings promote an accurate, not stereotypical, view of racial and ethnic groups. The use of cultural standards of data generalizations typically based upon universal statements reflecting Eurocentric normative and scientific principles in race and ethnicity research is explored. The last portion of the digest provides guidelines for developing unbiased research procedures in sampling, instrumentation, and measurement. Special education researchers are urged to take a proactive approach to ensuring unbiased, valid, and reliable research results by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic level in their research design, methodology, and reporting practices. (Contains 10 references.) (CR)
Connecting performance assessment to instruction by Lynn Fuchs( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 98 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest summarizes principles of performance assessment, which connects classroom assessment to learning. Specific ways that assessment can enhance instruction are outlined, as are criteria that assessments should meet in order to inform instructional decisions. Performance assessment is compared to behavioral assessment, mastery learning, and curriculum-based management. Three key features of performance assessment are distinguished: (1) students construct, rather than select, responses; (2) assessment formats allow teachers to observe student behavior on tasks reflecting real-world requirements; and (3) scoring reveals patterns in students' learning and thinking. An example of a performance assessment task is provided. Performance assessment is evaluated in terms of seven general criteria for assessment, such as the measurement of important learning outcomes; compatibility with a variety of instructional models; and ease of administration, scoring, and interpretation by teachers. (DB)
Creating meaningful performance assessments : fundamental concepts by Stephen N Elliott( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This booklet examines fundamental technical and implementation issues involved with large-scale, on-demand performance assessments and teacher-constructed, classroom-based performance assessments, especially for use with students who have disabilities. It discusses definitions and core concepts, outlines theoretical matters, reviews research on performance assessment, examines sources of validity evidence, addresses technical challenges such as alignment of task content with curriculum and "linking" assessments to compare results over time, and analyzes steps in the development and interpretation of an assessment task. The booklet concludes that: (1) apparently, all students can benefit from the classroom use of performance assessments; (2) many of the technical concerns are minimized at the classroom level, given the lower stakes associated with classroom-based decisions; and (3) with regard to the use of performance assessments in statewide assessment programs, where stakes are presumed to be high, more data are needed to temper dogma and ensure quality. (Contains 55 references.) (JDD)
Innovation and development in special education : directory of current projects by Council for Exceptional Children( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 86 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This directory provides abstracts of 236 current research projects funded by the Division of Innovation and Development, Office of Special Education Programs, U.S. Department of Education. Abstracts are grouped into the following 10 topical sections: (1) assessment and evaluation; (2) cultural differences; (3) infants, young children, and families; (4) instructional effectiveness, models, and learning; (5) policy, restructuring, and service delivery issues; (6) secondary education and postsecondary outcomes; (7) serious emotional disturbance and behavioral disorders; (8) severe disabilities; (9) teacher training, retention, and supply and demand; and (10) technology and software. The information for each project includes: title; the principal investigator's name, address, and telephone number; grant number; beginning and ending dates; and a summary covering the project's purpose, method, and anticipated products. Appendixes provide indexes to principal investigators, institutions, subjects, states, and grant competitions. (DB)
Homework practices that support students with disabilities by Arlington, Va. Eric/Osep Special Project Eric Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 85 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This issue discusses homework issues related to students with disabilities and how to ensure that students with disabilities benefit from homework. It addresses communication problems teachers face in assigning homework to students with disabilities and recommendations for overcoming these communication barriers. Strategies are provided for implementing cooperative homework, making homework work at home, providing after school program support for homework, and encouraging parental involvement in homework success. Preferred homework adaptations and tips for assigning homework are listed and include: (1) provide additional one-on-one assistance to students; (2) monitor students' homework more closely; (3) allow alternative response formats; (4) adjust the length of the assignment, ; (5) provide a peer tutor; (6) provide learning tools; (7) adjust evaluation standards; (8) give fewer assignments; (9) write the assignment on the chalkboard; (10) explain the assignment clearly; (11) remind students of due date periodically; (12) assign homework in small units; (13) coordinate with other teachers to prevent homework overload; and (14) make sure students and parents have information on policies on missed and late assignments, extra credit, and available adaptations. (Contains 10 references.) (Cr)
Universal design : ensuring access to the general education curriculum by Reston, VA. ERIC/OSEP Special Project on Interagency Information Dissemination ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 84 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This issue describes promising research and development in the use of universal design principles to ensure curriculum access. It defines universal design and describes the differences between universal design and assistive technology. The activities of the Center for Applied Special Technology, the National Center to Improve the Tools of Educators, and the University of Kentucky in applying the concept of universal design to cognitive issues are highlighted. Universal access principles for designing curriculum, which include focusing on big ideas, using conspicuous strategies, implementing mediated scaffolding, integrating strategies, providing judicious review, and providing primed background knowledge are listed. Tips for designing web sites for universal access, which include: (1) use high contrast backgrounds and text; (2) use Sans Serif fonts for text; (3) make liberal use of chunking; (4) avoid using italics; (5) make use of alt tags when using graphics; (6) avoid the use of frames; and (7) include scripts when using audio files, are also discussed. In sections titled "Views from the Field" and "State and Regional Perspectives," school districts and states share their experiences in providing universal access. (CR)
Beginning reading by Mary K Fitzsimmons( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 83 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This digest summarizes what is known about teaching the processes of phonological awareness and word recognition. It finds unequivocal research evidence that students who enter first grade with phonological awareness skills are more successful readers and urges explicit instruction in these skills. Examples of phonological awareness activities and teaching tips on developing phonological awareness and alphabetic understanding are provided. Research evidence on word recognition is reported which clearly shows that reading comprehension and other higher-order reading activities depend on strong word recognition skills, including phonological decoding skills. Several teaching tips for helping students learn to read words are presented, such as the importance of explicit instruction in the connection between sounds and letters and sounds and words. (DB)
Positive Behavioral Support by Reston, Va. Eric/Osep Special Project on Interagency Information Dissemination Eric Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 83 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper presents a synthesis of the research on positive behavioral support (pbs) for students with challenging behaviors. Pbs is a long-term approach to reducing the inappropriate behavior, teaching a more appropriate behavior, and providing the contextual supports necessary for successful outcomes. It notes that the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act require both a functional behavioral assessment and consideration of pbs to address challenging behavior. Overall, research is reported that shows that when pbs strategies are implemented schoolwide, children with and without disabilities benefit. Specific research reports are summarized and their key recommendations outlined. These studies support the implementation of pbs goals with guidelines such as alter the student's environment; provide schoolwide support; develop post-behavioral expectations in every classroom; use a cognitive-behavioral time-out strategy; implement specific positive supports for individual students; conduct functional assessments; understand cultural influences on behavior; work with families; and use technology to disseminate information. A contact list for authors of the summarized reports is attached. (Db)
Performance assessment and students with disabilities : usage in outcomes-based accountability systems by Margaret J McLaughlin( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 83 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

As part of the educational reform movement, states and local districts have implemented outcomes-based accountability for student outcomes. Outcomes-based accountability systems are using results of both traditional assessments, such as norm-referenced tests, and authentic performance assessments in an effort to measure broad domains of student knowledge. Issues in using performance assessments in large-scale on-demand assessment programs include the costs associated with administration and reliability in scoring. The level of rigor applied to assessment of outcomes for nondisabled students compared to students who are receiving special education services is being considered. Issues in using performance assessments for students with disabilities include defining the outcomes to be assessed, developing performance standards, developing assessment accommodations, and scoring. Five performance assessment programs that have taken various approaches to the inclusion of students with disabilities are described; these include Kentucky; Maryland; Vermont; Littleton, Colorado; and Arlington Heights, Illinois. Interviews with representatives of these programs indicated that students with disabilities could be exempted from participation in the assessment program (except in Kentucky) and that decisions to exempt were typically made by Individualized Education Program teams. (Contains 29 references.) (Jdd)
Innovation and development in special education : directory of current projects by Council for Exceptional Children( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 82 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This 1994 directory of project abstracts provides an overview of the ongoing efforts of researchers supported by the Division of Innovation and Development of the U.S. Office of Special Education Programs. Abstracts of 236 projects are separated into 10 sections according to the primary focus of the study. The 10 sections are: (1) assessment and evaluation; (2) cultural differences; (3) infants, young children, and families; (4) instructional effectiveness, models, and learning; (5) policy, restructuring, and service delivery issues; (6) secondary education and postsecondary outcomes; (7) serious emotional disturbance and behavioral disorders; (8) severe disabilities; (9) teacher training, retention, and supply/demand; and (10) technology and software. The information for each project includes principal investigator name and address, grant number, beginning and ending date, purpose, method, and anticipated products. Access to the abstracts is provided by indices for principal investigator, institution, subject, state, and competition. (JDD)
Creating meaningful performance assessments : fundamental concepts by Stephen N Elliott( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 82 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

National and state perspectives on performance assessment and students with disabilities by Martha L Thurlow( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 82 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A curriculum every student can use : design principles for student access by Raymond Orkwis( Book )

2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 81 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This publication addresses issues involved in universal design for learning as they relate to full access to the general education curriculum for students with disabilities. It begins by discussing curriculum access and student engagement according to the federal mandates, which require students with disabilities to be given the opportunity to participate in the general education curriculum. Universal design for learning is described as providing flexible curricula materials and activities that offer alternatives for students with disparities in abilities and backgrounds. Charts illustrate how universal design for products and environments differs from universal design for learning, with its three essential curriculum qualities (representation, expression, and engagement). The publication closes with suggested first steps in implementing universal design for learning. An appendix provides a framework that summarizes the salient principles of universal design in a practical context to help teachers and other interested individuals consider how the tools employed in the classroom can realistically provide broader access to the curriculum for all students. It describes alternatives that reduce perceptual barriers, cognitive barriers, motor and cognitive barriers to expression, and describes alternative ways of encouraging engagement in the learning environment. (CR)
Connecting performance assessment to instruction by Lynn Fuchs( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 81 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Teaching English-language learners with learning difficulties : guiding principles and examples from research-based practice
Covers
Connecting performance assessment to instruction
Alternative Names
ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education. Special Project

Special Education Programs (U.S.). Special Project

Languages
English (30)