WorldCat Identities

United States Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology

Overview
Works: 117 works in 177 publications in 1 language and 7,475 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals 
Classifications: U393, 355.7
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by United States
Joint warfighting science and technology plan( )

in English and held by 448 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Guidance on land use control agreements with environmental regulatory agencies by United States( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 246 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Policy on land use controls associated with environmental restoration activities by United States( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 245 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Acquiring Defense Software Commercially by United States( )

3 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 233 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Defense Science Board Task Force on Acquiring Defense Software Commercially recognizes that DoD systems are becoming increasingly dependent on the use of software as the mechanism for implementing operational capabilities. To adapt to changing military and national security situations, DoD is more dependent than ever on its ability to modify mission software rapidly, often in near real-time. However, software remains the schedule and cost driver for the development and maintenance of many important defense systems
Report of the Defense Science Board Summer Study Task Force on Information Architecture for the Battlefield by United States( )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 233 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Task Force addressed four aspects of information architecture for the battlefield: the use of information in warfare; the use of information warfare, both offensive and defensive; the business practices of the DoD in acquiring and using battlefield information systems; and the underlying technology required to develop and implement these systems. This report emphasizes the importance of the warfighter as the principal customer for battlefield information systems. In today's complex world, the warfighter requires flexible information systems that can be readily and rapidly adapted to accomplish different missions. Further, the Task Force is quite concerned that DoD information systems are highly vulnerable to information warfare. However, the Task Force also found that the information systems of potential adversaries are also quite vulnerable. The Task Force believes that management structure changes can provide an effective approach to integration of disparate systems. The group reinforces that notion that DoD can greatly enhance the effectiveness of limited DoD resources by leveraging available commercial products and technology
Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Military Operations in Built-Up Areas (MOBA) by United States( )

3 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 232 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The 1994 Defense Science Board (DSB) Summer Study on Military Operations in Built-up Areas (MOBA) was asked to assess DoD's current capabilities to conduct military operations (including peacemaking and peacekeeping) in urban terrain. The Board focused on operations other than war (OOTW) in an urban environment OOTW can include periods of intense, localized combat. Many of the requirements and proposed solutions for OOTW are relevant to war in cities. The solutions are also relevant in low intensity conflict and in operations that provide humanitarian aid, where minimization of casualties is especially important. The guidance in the Terms of Reference (TOR, see Appendix A) requested that the Board examine: * The potential for U.S. involvement in MOBA * The characteristics of urban operations * Shortcomings in current capability and operational needs (especially regarding survivability, sensors, platforms, navigation, and communication) * Innovative solutions leading to a recommended focus for future efforts. Addressed, were operations that might involve combat, not solely deterrence, psychological operations (PSYOPS), or other noncombat forms of conflict resolution. The study examined: improvements to sensors; weapons (lethal and nonlethal); command, control, communications, and intelligence (C3I) systems; and doctrine. It also focused on solutions to issues that could be accomplished in a relatively short time, and that do not require beginning major new programs
Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Tactical Air Warfare by United States( )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 232 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Readiness : [final report] by United States( )

3 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 231 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document contains the final report of the DSB Task Force on Readiness. The report focuses on the Department's readiness management and oversight processes, especially key indicators for measuring readiness and candidate methodologies for providing early warning of potential readiness problem and on other matters affecting individual and collective readiness. The Task Force did not look in detail into acquisition, technology, or industrial base issues related to readiness; the adequacy of forces to carry out the Bottom-Up Review; or nuclear forces strategy and requirements. The Task Force concluded that although there are some downward indicators, the general readiness posture of today's conventional and unconventional forces is acceptable in most measurable areas. However, the Task Force reported that is observed enough concerns that they were convinced that unless the Department of Defense and the Congress focus on readiness, the armed forces could slip into a 'hollow' status. For analytical purposes, the Task Force divided readiness into three levels: unit, joint (and combined) force, and national. The Task Force found that there currently exists a well-defined reporting system to evaluate the current readiness of combat and support units. It found the Department's systems for predicting future unit readiness significantly less mature and less comprehensive. The Task Force determined that the Department has neither a clear definition of joint readiness nor of a system to measure it. At the highest level, national readiness is important to ensure that our forces have sufficient readiness to carry out our National Military Strategy. The Task Force deferred judgment on this level of readiness
Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Persian Gulf War health effects by United States( )

3 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 230 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Task force was established to review information regarding the possible exposure of personnel to chemical and biological weapons agents and other hazardous material during the Gulf War and its aftermath
Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on C-17 Review by United States( )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 229 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on joint precision interdiction by United States( )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 229 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document contains the final report of the DSB Task Force on Joint Precision Interdiction (JPI). The work of the Task Force drew on several years effort of the DSB Task Force on Follow-On Force Attack (FOFA) in which emphasis was placed on evaluation of the risk associated with developmental sensor and weapons technologies. EUCOM did pioneering work in developing operational concepts and mission definitions relating to the application of new systems under the name jOint Precision Interdiction. The Task Force found that planning for the acquisition of the sensors and weapons were well structured through resulting in a slower introduction into the Services than one might prefer. However, major difficulties were identified relating to the information systems and command and control intelligence systems required to implement the JOINT application of JSTARS, Battlefield Intelligence Systems, Precision Guided Weapons and Smart Munitions
Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Joint Advanced Strike Technology (JAST) Program by United States( )

3 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 228 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Joint Advanced Strike Technology (JAST) resulted from the decisions of the Secretary of Defense' Bottom Up Review (BUR). Each service has a demonstrated need for advanced technology aircraft to meet future contingencies, but it was determined that costs for development and production of these several different aircraft could not be met due to budgetary constraints. The BUR found that there were not enough resources available to support all these programs in future years. The decision was made to continue with the Air Force F-22 fighter aircraft, and the F/A-18E/F aircraft for the Navy, but to cancel the A/F-X and the MRF. The decision on ASTOL was to continue that research, but to secure specific commitment of resources by at least two of the three Services before building a flying prototype.The BUR also confirmed the continuing needs that were to be met by the A/F-X and MRF programs. This led to the establishment of the Joint Advanced Strike Technology Program in July 1993
Report of the Defense Science Board Summer Study Task Force on defense manufacturing enterprise strategy by United States( )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 227 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Over the past decade, dozens of studies, reports, directives, and commissions have recommended specific changes in the approach the Department of Defense (DoD) uses to acquire products (primarily major weapon systems). This Defense Science Board (DSB) Summer Study Task Force reviewed these prior studies and concluded that, by and large, the recommendations have ben implemented. Rather than adding to the list of 'what to do' recommendations, this Task Force concentrated on recommending 'how-to-implement' change. This is a departure from the typical technical recommendations, but the Task Force believes this 'how to' focus is urgently needed at this juncture
Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Defense Acquisition Reform (Phase II) by United States( )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 226 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document contains the final report of the DSB study on Defense Acquisition Reform (Phase II). The Phase I report firmly acknowledged the need to adopt commercial practices as a way of doing business, and developed a set of reform initiatives designed to accelerate the required changes. The thrust of the Phase II effort was to further define these areas by examining specific industry segments, identifying specific combatant commands for increase responsibility in the requirements process, and further identification of the barriers to the adoption of commercial practices. The Task Force concludes that: mature jet engines, microelectronics, software, and space systems can and should be procured and supported in a fully commercial environment; USACOM and CENTCOM should be given increased technical cadres to further their capability to participate in the requirements process; and it is feasible to eliminate may of the barriers to adoption of commercial practices without sacrificing the public trust in spending public funds
Appendix D to the report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Defense Acquisition Reform (phase II) : Jet Engine Commercial Practices Panel final report by United States( )

2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 226 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Final report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Globalization and Security by United States( )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 222 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Globalization-the integration of the political, economic and cultural activities of geographically and/or nationally separated peoples-is not a discernible event or challenge, is not new, but it is accelerating. More importantly, globalization is largely irresistible. Thus, globalization is not a policy option, but a fact to which policymakers must adapt. Globalization has accelerated as a result of many positive factors, the most notable of which include: the collapse of communism and the end of the Cold War; the spread of capitalism and free trade; more rapid and global capital flows and more liberal financial markets; the liberalization of communications; international academic and scientific collaboration; and faster and more efficient forms of transportation. At the core of accelerated global integration-at once its principal cause and consequence-is the information revolution, which is knocking down once-formidable barriers of physical distance, blurring national boundaries and creating cross-border communities of all types
Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on outsourcing and privatization by United States( )

3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 221 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Outsourcing is expanding rapidly in the private sector, and a robust new industry has developed to provide a wide range outsourcing services to U. S. companies (revenues are estimated at $100 billion per year). While cost savings are a factor in the growth of outsourcing, access to better technology and better qualified people is the primary reason. Moreover, many companies have turned to outsourcing to free up the time and energies of management to focus on the companies' core competencies. Public sector entities at the state and local level as well as at the Federal level have demonstrated the value of outsourcing in terms saving money (30% plus savings) and providing better, more responsive service. The Task Force believes that all DoD support functions should be contracted out to private vendors except those functions which are inherently governmental, are directly involved in warfighting, or for which no adequate private sector capability exists or can be expected to be established. Most defense agencies are prime outsourcing candidates. Specifically, the Task Force recommends that DoD consider outsourcing major portions of the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA), the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), and the Defense Finance and Accounting Agency (DFAS) as initial steps toward streamlining DoD's support infrastructure. Many support functions performed primarily by military personnel (e.g., individual training and support services in military hospitals) are also ripe for outsourcing
Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on DoD warfighting transformation by United States( )

2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 219 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Defense Science Board (DSB) Warfighting Transformation Task Force was charged with reviewing the transformation activities underway in the Department of Defense (DoD) to: * provide an independent, comprehensive picture of transformation efforts that encompasses processes, organizational responsibilities, and anticipated products; * identify opportunities to enhance, as well as the obstacles to, transformation progress; and * recommend Criteria to gauge progress over the next several years. Transformation efforts within DoD today involve an inevitable tension between dealing with today's problems and preparing for tomorrow's. But an even more formidable tension exists between alternative views of tomorrow's challenges and between competing approaches to address them. Transformation is about defining and implementing a vision of the future different from the one embedded, if only implicitly, in DoD's current plans and programs. Such a transformation requires powerful, high-level support to survive in today's resource-competitive environment
The Defense Science Board 1998 Summer Study Task Force on Dod Logistics Trnsformation by United States( )

4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 218 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Submarine of the Future by United States( )

3 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 216 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report examines how nuclear attack submarines (SSNs) best serve the nation's future defense needs. The Terms of Reference directed that emphasis be placed on operational utility of future generations of submarines (beyond the New Attack Submarine (NSSN)) and the impact of the littoral environment on submarine design and operation in the context of joint operations
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityUnited States. Office of the Under Secretary of Defense, Acquisition

controlled identityUnited States. Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics

OUSD (A & T)

United States. Office of the Under Secretary of Defense, Acquisition and Technology

United States. Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology, Office of the

Languages
English (47)