WorldCat Identities

Walsh, Jerome T. 1942-

Overview
Works: 25 works in 90 publications in 1 language and 4,294 library holdings
Genres: Commentaries  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: BS1335.3, 221.66
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Jerome T Walsh
2 Samuel by Craig E Morrison( )

5 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 1,021 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

King David ranks among the most intriguing persons in the Hebrew Bible. The Second Book of Samuel tells the story of David's kingship-his public successes and his private foibles. The narrator's rehearsal of this story, as questioning as it is vivid, glimpses the secrets of David's heart. In this commentary, Craig E. Morrison focuses on the aesthetics of the ""art of the telling"": how does the narrator succeed in breathing life into his portrait of David? How does he draw the reader into his story? This commentary is intended to accompany the reader's encounter with this ancient masterpiece s
1 Kings by Jerome T Walsh( Book )

8 editions published in 1996 in English and Undetermined and held by 413 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The narratives of Solomon and Jeroboam, of Elijah and Ahab, have fascinated readers for millennia. They are the principal foundation of our knowledge of the history of Israel during the early years of the divided monarchy, and their reliability and verifiability as historical sources have long been the subject of intense scholarly analysis and debate. But even apart from questions of historical authenticity, they are gripping stories of richly drawn characters caught up in the complex tale of Yahweh's dealings with Israel: Solomon the wise is the builder of Yahweh's Temple, yet he becomes an idolater; Jeroboam is chosen by Yahweh as king, yet he worships the golden calves; Elijah is a prophet second only to Moses, yet he tries to renounce his calling; and Ahab is the worst of Israel's kings, yet shows traces of greatness." "This study explores the narrative world created by the ancient Israelite author - the people who inhabit it, the lives they live and the deeds they do, and the face of God who is revealed in their stories."--Jacket
Ruth by Tod Linafelt( Book )

10 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 410 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In Ruth, Tod Linafelt offers an interpretation of the book which he calls "unsettling," in that he refuses to settle on a single meaning in a book so fraught with complexity and ambiguity. Ambiguity built into grammar, syntax, and vocabulary carrie over into the larger issues of characterization, theology, and the book's purpose. He also argues that Ruth is intended to read as an interlude between Judges and Samuel. Esther, by Timothy Beal, focuses on a story of anti-Judaism in an ancient world that raises contemporary questions about sexism, ethnocentrism, and natioinal identity. Beal questions the text without assuming that there will be univocal answers, allowing for complexity, perplexity, and the importance of accidents. Beal emphasizes the general and the tenative over the continuous. Using rhetorical criticism as a way into the text, Beal also focuses on its narrative structure
The twelve prophets by Marvin A Sweeney( Book )

3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 408 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This two-volume set is a literary commentary of the book of the Twelve Prophets. Building upon the author's previous work on the structure and literary coherence of the book of Isaiah, it attempts to read the book of the Twelve as a distinctive literary work with its own structure, themes and theological or ideological perspective. In addition, it treats each of the twelve minor prophets as a literary entity unto itself as well as a component unity of the larger book of the Twelve
2 Kings by Robert L Cohn( Book )

4 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 388 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Opening with the prophet Elijah's ascent into heaven and closing with the people of Judah's descent to Babylonia, 2 Kings charts the story of the two Israelite kingdoms until their destruction. This commentary unfolds the literary dimensions of 2 Kings, analyzes the strategies through which its words create a world of meaning, and examines the book's tales of prophets, political intrigue, royal apostasy, and religious reform as components of larger patterns." "2 Kings is divided into four parts including Part One "The Story of Elisha: 2 Kings 1:1-8:6"; Part Two "Revolutions in Aram, Israel, and Judah: 2 Kings 8:7-13:25": Part Three "Turmoil and Tragedy for Israel: 2 Kings 14-17"; and Part Four "Renewal and Catastrophe for Judah: 2 King 18-25.""--Jacket
The Song of songs by Dianne Bergant( Book )

4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 387 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This commentary views the Song of Songs as a collection of love poems that pays tribute to mutual love, and it carefully examines features of Hebrew poetry in order to uncover the delicacy of their expression. It is unique in the attention that it gives to the obvious feminine perspective of the poems and to their ecosensitive character. Whether it is the woman in awe of the strength and splendor of her lover or the man praising her physical charms, the descriptions all call on elements from the natural world to characterize the feature being described
Ezra and Nehemiah by Gordon F Davies( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 365 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Though Ezra and Nehemiah have been somewhat neglected in biblical studies, they are important as one of the few windows into the Persian period of Israel's history, the setting for so much of the final shape of the Hebrew Bible. To know this period is to know what influenced these redactors
Style and structure in Biblical Hebrew narrative by Jerome T Walsh( Book )

9 editions published between 2001 and 2017 in English and held by 325 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Style matters! The pages of the Hebrew Bible are filled with stories -- short or long, amusing or sad, histories, fables, and morality tales. The ancient narrators use a variety of stylistic devices to structure, to connect, and to separate their tales -- and thus to establish contexts within which meaning comes to light. What are these devices, and how do they guide our reading and our understanding of the text? This book explores some of the answers and shows that it's a matter of style. Fr. Jerome T. Walsh, Ph. D., is also author of 1 Kings in the literary commentary series Berit Olam: Studies in Hebrew Narrative & Poetry (The Liturgical Press, 1996) of which he is also an associate editor. He has contributed to such reference works as The New Jerome Biblical Commentary and The Anchor Bible Dictionary and frequently publishes articles and reviews in professional journals of biblical studies. He is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature and of the Catholic Biblical Association of America, with which he has collaborated on the second edition of the New American Bible translation of the Old Testament. He is head of the department of theology and religious studies at the University of Botswana
Old Testament narrative : a guide to interpretation by Jerome T Walsh( Book )

5 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 248 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Old Testament's stories are intriguing, mesmerizing, and provocative not only due to their ancient literary craft but also because of their ongoing relevance. In this volume, well suited to college and seminary use, Walsh explains how to interpret these narrative passages of Scripture based on standard literary elements such as plot, characterization, setting, pace, point of view, and patterns of repetition. This book ... [contains] an appendix that offers practical examples of narrative interpretation--something no other book on Old Testament interpretation offers. These examples are coordinated with guided exercises that enable students to get hands-on experience. -- from PUBLISHER DESCRIPTION
Ahab : the construction of a king by Jerome T Walsh( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 137 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In this book Walsh sheds new, if not always more positive, light on Ahab, king of Israel during the ninth century BCE."--BOOK JACKET
The twelve prophets by Marvin A Sweeney( )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 49 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The twelve prophets by Marvin A Sweeney( )

3 editions published between 2000 and 2016 in English and held by 39 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

There is generally no common material that binds together the works of the individual prophets that comprise the Twelve, but through Sweeney's commentary they stand together as a single, clearly defined book among the other prophetic books of the Bible. The Book of the Twelve Prophets is a multifaceted literary composition that functions simultaneously in al Jewish and Christian versions of the Bible as a single prophetic book and as a collection of twelve individual prophetic books. Each of the twelve individual books - Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi - begins with its own narrative introduction that identifies the prophet and provides details concerning the historical setting and literary characteristics. In this manner each book is clearly distinguished from the others within the overall framework of the Twelve. By employing a combination of literary methodologies, such as reader response criticism, canonical criticism, and structural form criticism, Sweeney establishes the literary structure of the Book of the Twelve as a whole, and of each book with their respective ideological or theological perspectives. An introductory chapter orients readers to questions posed by reading the Book of the Twelve as a coherent piece of literature and to a literary overview of the Twelve. Sweeney then treats each of the twelve individual prophetic books in the order of the Masoretic canon, providing a discussion of each one's structure, theme, and outlook. This is followed by a detailed literary discussion of the textual units that comprise the book
The Elijah cycle : a synchronic approach by Jerome T Walsh( )

11 editions published between 1982 and 1989 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The text consists of a stylistic analysis based on the Massoretic Text with no significant emendations. The analysis was done in virtually exclusive dialogue with the narratives themselves and can be read as a self-contained unit with no reference to secondary literature
Berit Olam by Tod Linafelt( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Some ancient works of literature survive in fragments that appear so simple and complete that it's hard to imagine them as being part of a larger narrative. Such is the case with Ruth and Esther. On first reading they appear so simple, so whole, and their meanings so completely self-evident. Yet the closer you look, the more perplexing they become. Ruth and Esther offers that close look, enabling readers to discover the uncertainties of the texts and demonstrating how these uncertainties are not problems to be solved, but rather are integral to the narrative art of these texts. In Ruth, the first part of this volume, Tod Linafelt highlights the most unresolved and perplexing aspects of Ruth. In doing so he offers an interpretation he calls "unsettling." Linafelt states that it is unsettling in the sense that he often refuses to settle on a single, unequivocal meaning of a particular word, phrase, or theme. Rather he prefers to underscore the dual or even multiple meanings that the narrative so often has. Another way Ruth differs from other interpretations is that Linafelt entertains the possibility that there might be complexity or ambiguity with regard to the various characters motivations, the presentation of God, or the books purpose. In this commentary, Linafelt explores the ambiguities of meaning built into the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the story to discover how these ambiguities carry over to the larger interpretive issues of characterization, theology, and purpose. He also lays forth an argument that the book of Ruth is intended to be read as an interlude between Judges and Samuel. The second part of this volume focuses on Esther, a story of anti-Judaism that raises strikingly contemporary questions concerning relations between sexism, ethnocentrism, and national identity. In Esther, Timothy Beal guides readers into the meaning of the story using rhetorical criticism. He asks questions without assuming that there must be answers and allows for complexity, perplexity, and the importance of accidents in the text. In essence, Beal emphasizes the particular over the general and the tentative over the continuous; however, he does not altogether dismiss the importance of broader interpretations of Esther, especially those focusing on narrative structure. Chapters in Ruth are The Bond between Ruth and Naomi, Finding Favor in Boaz's Field, An Ambiguous Encounter in the Night, and Making It All Legal. Chapters in Esther are Beginning with the End of Vashti: Esther 1:1-22, Remembering to Forget: Esther 2:1-4, New Family Dynamics: Esther 2:5-18, Coup: Esther 2:19-23, Politics of Anti-Judaism: Esther 3:1-15, Another Quarter: Esther 4:1-17, Face to Face: Esther 5:1-8, Fifty Cubits for Mordecai: Esther 5:9-14, Sleep Deserts: Esther 6:1-14, Coming Out Party: Esther 7:1- 10, Overwriting: Esther 8:1-17, and Aftermath: Esther 9:1-10:3
Reading and understanding the Bible from an African perspective : proceedings of the BOLESWA Conference held at the University of Botswana, 24-25 February, 1997 by BOLESWA Conference( Book )

2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

1 Samuel by David Jobling( Book )

4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

While drawing on the resources of the new biblical "narratology," this reading of 1 Samuel diverges from the mainstream in fundamental ways. It pretends to no ideological neutrality, but espouses a "critical narratology" informed by such cultural practices as feminism and psychoanalysis. It follows a structuralist tradition which finds meaning more in the text's large-scale mythic patterns than in close reading of particular passages. It seeks methods specific to 1 Samuel rather than ones applicable to biblical narrative in general. Organizing the text through the three interlocking thematic fields of class, race, and gender, the author asks how such a canonical book may function in a modern context where these themes continue to be of crucial importance
The twelve prophets by Marvin A Sweeney( Book )

in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This two-volume set is a literary commentary of the book of the Twelve Prophets. Building upon the author's previous work on the structure and literary coherence of the book of Isaiah, it attempts to read the book of the Twelve as a distinctive literary work with its own structure, themes and theological or ideological perspective. In addition, it treats each of the twelve minor prophets as a literary entity unto itself as well as a component unity of the larger book of the Twelve
Ezra and Nehemiah by Gordon F Davies( Book )

4 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ezra-Nehemiah has been neglected in biblical studies, but it is important as one of the few windows into the Persian period of Israel's history, the setting for so much of the final shape of the Hebrew Bible. To know this period is to know what influenced these redactors. In Ezra and Nehemiah Gordon Davies provides that knowledge using rhetorical criticism, a methodology that reveals the full range and progress of the book's ideas without hiding its rough seams and untidy edges. The purpose of rhetorical criticism is to explain not the source but the power of the text as a unitary message. This approach does not look at plot development, characterization, or other elements whose roughness makes Ezra-Nehemiah frustrating to read. Instead, it examines the three parts of the relationship - the strategies, the situations, and the effects - between the speaker and the audience. Rhetorical criticism's scrutiny of the audience in context favors the search for the ideas and structures that are indigenous to the culture of the text. Rhetorical criticism is interested in figures of speech as means of persuasion. Therefore, to apply it to Ezra-Nehemiah, Davies concentrates on the public discourse - the orations, letters, and prayers - throughout its text. In each chapter he follows a procedure that: (1) where it is unclear, identifies the rhetorical unit in which the discourse is set; (2) identifies the audiences of the discourse and the rhetorical situation; (3) studies the arrangement of the material; (4) studies the effect on the various audiences; (5) reviews the passage as a whole and judges its success. In the conclusion, Davies explains that Ezra-Nehemiah makes theological sense on its own terms, by forming a single work in which a range of ideas is argued. Biblical scholars as well as those interested in literary criticism, communication studies, rhetorical studies, ecclesiology, and homiletics will find Ezra and Nehemiah enlightening
Ruth and Esther by Tod Linafelt( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy by Stephen K Sherwood( Book )

2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Many good intentions to read the entire Bible have foundered on the rocks of Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Do these books have literary qualities? How does the storyteller tell the story? InLeviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Stephen Sherwood, C.M.F., applies the tools of narrative criticism to look for the literary qualities of these three biblical books. Sherwood identifies the narrative art of Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy not only in such colorful stories as the Sabbath breaker, the threat from Sihon and Og, the deaths of Nadab and Abihu, the story of Balaam, the bronze serpent, Aaron's rod, Miriam's leprosy, and the water from the rock, but also through the extended discourses made by characters in the story. Sherwood studies the voices of several of these characters: the narrator, the Lord, Moses, Aaron, the Israelites, Balaam and Barak, and others, to see how each is characterized" by their words and actions. In Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Sherwood also shows how each of the three books has its own characteristics as part of a larger story. Leviticus deals mainly with divine speech. Numbers also contains divine speech but the voices of Moses and the narrator are more recurrent. Deuteronomy is presented in the form of a farewell speech of Moses before his death. The story is then retold from Moses' point of view, with different emphases and even some changes. Chapters are *General Introduction, - *Leviticus, - *Numbers, - and *Deuteronomy. - Each chapter contains a general introduction to a biblical book which is followed by notes which make observations on the literary qualities of smaller units of each book
 
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1 Kings
Covers
RuthThe twelve prophets2 KingsThe Song of songsEzra and NehemiahStyle and structure in Biblical Hebrew narrativeOld Testament narrative : a guide to interpretationAhab : the construction of a king
Alternative Names
J.T. Walsh acteur américain

J.T. Walsh aktor amerykański

J.T. Walsh Amerikaans filmacteur

J. T. Walsh attore statunitense

J. T. Walsh US-amerikanischer Schauspieler

J. T. Walsh yhdysvaltalainen näyttelijä

J. T. 월시

J・T・ウォルシュ

Walsh, Jerome Thomas 1942-

Джей Ти Уолш

Джей Ті Волш

ג'יי טי וולש

جی تی والش بازیگر آمریکایی

Languages
English (80)